DistrictCampusDirectory
CAMPUS

Bill Nobles

Welcome to my online classroom.

8-14-17 to 8-18-17 Lesson Plans

World History  Neolithic Revolution Lesson 1 – Questions and Predictions

 

Objectives:

 

  • Students will work independently and collaboratively to generate questions about the topic
  • Students will work independently and collaboratively to generate predictions about the topic
  • Students will practice listening and note-taking skills

 

Common Core Standards:

 

Writing (9-10)

  1. Persuasive Texts: Write arguments to support claims, using analysis and evidence.
  2. Explanatory Texts: Write informative/explanatory texts.
  3. Narratives: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.
  4. Clarity: Produce clear/coherent writing appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  5. Revision Process: Develop/strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, rewriting.
  6. Technology: Use technology/Internet, to produce, publish, and update writing products.
  7. Research: Short/sustained research to answer a question or solve a problem
  8. Sources: Gather information from and assess multiple print and digital sources
  9. Sources: Use evidence from literary/informational texts for analysis, reflection, research.
  10. Writing: Routinely over short and extended time frames for tasks, purposes, audiences.

 

Reading (9-10)

  1.   Evidence: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of the text and your inferences.
  2.   Thesis: Determine and summarize a central idea of a text and analyze its development
  3.   Development:

I: Analyze how (order, introduction, connection) the author unfolds analysis.

L: Analyze how complex characters develop, interact, and advance plot in a text.

  1.   Word Usage: Determine figurative, connotative, and technical meaning of words/phrases
  2.   Development of Thesis:
  1. Analyze how an author’s ideas/claims are developed and refined

L. Analyze how authors create mystery, tension, or surprise using structure, order of events, and manipulation of time.

  1. Author’s Point of View:
  1. Determine author’s POV/purpose and how rhetoric advances it

L. Analyze a POV/cultural experience in a work from outside the USA

  1. Various points of view: Analyze and compare accounts of a subject in different mediums including what is present or absent in each
  2. Evaluating the author: Delineate/evaluate reasoning of arguments/claims and if the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
  3. Historical Texts:         
  1. Analyze related themes and concepts in historical/literary documents.

L. Analyze how an author draws on/transforms source material in a work 

 

Speaking - Listening (9-10)

  1.   Types of Discussions: Collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
    1. Preparation for Discussions: Read and research material under study; refer to evidence from texts and other research to stimulate well-reasoned discussion.
    2. Rules for discussions: Set rules for discussions, decision-making, goals, deadlines, and roles with peers.
    3. Discussions: Pose and respond to questions, incorporate other people, and clarify, verify, and challenge ideas to propel discussions.
    4. Responses: Respond to perspectives, summarize agreement and disagreement, and qualify or justify your own views to make new connections using evidence and reasoning.
  2.   Sources used in presentations: Use and evaluate the credibility/accuracy of multiple sources in diverse media or formats.
  3.   Point of View of the Speaker: Evaluate a speaker’s POV/reasoning/evidence/rhetoric; identify fallacious reasoning or exaggerated/distorted evidence.
  4.   Coherence of Presentation: Present clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and it is appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  5.   Use of multi-media: Make strategic use of digital media in presentations.
  6. Adaptation: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks

 

Language (Grades 9-10)

 

  1. Grammar: Demonstrate conventions of grammar and usage when writing/speaking using parallel structure, various phrases and clauses
  2. Conventions: Command of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing
  3. Language Function: Make effective choices for meaning or style.
  4. Style Guidelines: Write and edit work to a style manual appropriate for the discipline and writing type.
  5. Meaning of words: Use context clues to determine/clarify word meanings.
  6. Word Changes: Identify and use word changes/morphs that indicate different meanings.
  7. Pronunciation: Research word pronunciation and meaning/part of speech/etymology
  8. Checking word meaning predictions: Verify word meaning with other sources
  9. Figurative Language: Understand figurative language, word relationships, word nuances, and figures of speech while analyzing their role in the text.
  10. Academic and domain-specific language: Acquire/use general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

 

----------------------------------

Aim: How can we brainstorm questions and predictions about the Neolithic Revolution?

 

Do Now: What does the term “revolution” mean? Explain it 2 different ways on paper. (ways can mean two different sentences/explanations, or one using text/language and another using picture or image). (5 minutes)

 

On Board: First 3 students to finish come to the board and write/draw their best explanation

 

Have class turn to the people next to them and explain what they wrote by either having the person read it, or by explaining it a third way (out loud, saying something different from what you wrote/drew). (5 minutes)

 

Go over the term with students. Use what is written on the board and what people chime in by hand-raising to construct a working definition – that can be many sentences long – of a “revolution”. (5 minutes)

 

Ask the class – does anyone know what the word “Neolithic” might mean?

 

Someone might say something about “new”. If so, tell them they are right and it meant the New Stone Age.

 

On Board: Neolithic

                      ||      ||

                 new    stone

 

So thinking about what we know about revolution and what we now know about Neolithic, let’s make a list of questions we have about the Neolithic Revolution. (5 minutes)

 

Questions: Have students take out the list of “Questions Historians Ask about Events” and use it to brainstorm Neolithic Revolution specific questions into their Questions/Predictions Sheet. They are allowed to steal questions from others, but they need to have 1:2 ratio of questions they write to questions others write. (15 minutes)

 

Predictions: As a whole class, we can brainstorm some predictions based on our questions. We should fill this in as a class, with students taking credit for their words by allowing us all to cite them as the source of the prediction. We get 10 of them into the sheet. (10 minutes)

 

 

 

Neolithic Revolution Lesson Plan 2: Claims and Counterclaims

 

Objectives:

  • Students will practice logical reasoning to deduce what it takes to make a cell phone
  • Students will read a diagram showing cause and effect
  • Students will practice reading using the SCUBA method
  • Students will practice annotating for claims, arguments, and evidence
  • Students will practice multiple choice questions
  • Students will speak and listen to each other’s explanations

 

Common Core Standards Addressed:

 

Writing (9-10)

  1. Persuasive Texts: Write arguments to support claims, using analysis and evidence.
  2. Explanatory Texts: Write informative/explanatory texts.
  3. Narratives: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.
  4. Clarity: Produce clear/coherent writing appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  5. Revision Process: Develop/strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, rewriting.
  6. Technology: Use technology/Internet, to produce, publish, and update writing products.
  7. Research: Short/sustained research to answer a question or solve a problem
  8. Sources: Gather information from and assess multiple print and digital sources
  9. Sources: Use evidence from literary/informational texts for analysis, reflection, research.
  10. Writing: Routinely over short and extended time frames for tasks, purposes, audiences.

 

Reading (9-10)

  1.   Evidence: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of the text and your inferences.
  2.   Thesis: Determine and summarize a central idea of a text and analyze its development
  3.   Development:

I: Analyze how (order, introduction, connection) the author unfolds analysis.

L: Analyze how complex characters develop, interact, and advance plot in a text.

  1.   Word Usage: Determine figurative, connotative, and technical meaning of words/phrases
  2.   Development of Thesis:
  1. Analyze how an author’s ideas/claims are developed and refined

L. Analyze how authors create mystery, tension, or surprise using structure, order of events, and manipulation of time.

  1. Author’s Point of View:
  1. Determine author’s POV/purpose and how rhetoric advances it

L. Analyze a POV/cultural experience in a work from outside the USA

  1. Various points of view: Analyze and compare accounts of a subject in different mediums including what is present or absent in each
  2. Evaluating the author: Delineate/evaluate reasoning of arguments/claims and if the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
  3. Historical Texts:
  1. Analyze related themes and concepts in historical/literary documents.

L. Analyze how an author draws on/transforms source material in a work 

 

Speaking - Listening (9-10)

  1.   Types of Discussions: Collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
    1. Preparation for Discussions: Read and research material under study; refer to evidence from texts and other research to stimulate well-reasoned discussion.
    2. Rules for discussions: Set rules for discussions, decision-making, goals, deadlines, and roles with peers.
    3. Discussions: Pose and respond to questions, incorporate other people, and clarify, verify, and challenge ideas to propel discussions.
    4. Responses: Respond to perspectives, summarize agreement and disagreement, and qualify or justify your own views to make new connections using evidence and reasoning.
  2.   Sources used in presentations: Use and evaluate the credibility/accuracy of multiple sources in diverse media or formats.
  3.   Point of View of the Speaker: Evaluate a speaker’s POV/reasoning/evidence/rhetoric; identify fallacious reasoning or exaggerated/distorted evidence.
  4.   Coherence of Presentation: Present clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and it is appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  5.   Use of multi-media: Make strategic use of digital media in presentations.
  6. Adaptation: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks

 

Language (Grades 9-10)

 

  1. Grammar: Demonstrate conventions of grammar and usage when writing/speaking using parallel structure, various phrases and clauses
  2. Conventions: Command of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing
  3. Language Function: Make effective choices for meaning or style.
  4. Style Guidelines: Write and edit work to a style manual appropriate for the discipline and writing type.
  5. Meaning of words: Use context clues to determine/clarify word meanings.
  6. Word Changes: Identify and use word changes/morphs that indicate different meanings.
  7. Pronunciation: Research word pronunciation and meaning/part of speech/etymology
  8. Checking word meaning predictions: Verify word meaning with other sources
  9. Figurative Language: Understand figurative language, word relationships, word nuances, and figures of speech while analyzing their role in the text.
  10. Academic and domain-specific language: Acquire/use general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------

Aim: How did the Neolithic Revolution cause the development of civilization?

 

Do Now: What do you need to make a cell phone?

(2-5 minutes)

 

  • Teacher holds up their cell phone and poses this question to students.
  • They must first brainstorm on their own, writing a list of things one would need to create a cell phone.

 

Share out: After thinking and writing on their own, teacher leads students in a share out. Each student contributes one thing to the list.

 

  • What the students don’t realize is that their lists are very incomplete
  • Teacher should ask them probing questions to get them to add more to the list. If they say “you need metal” the teacher would ask “ok, so what do people need to get the metal?” looking for students to say “workers”, or “machines” or “shovels” and then the teacher can ask “ok, so who makes the shovels/machines?” or “how do the workers GET TO the mine?”
  • The teacher is leading students to realize that to make a cell phone, it requires the materials, but also money, government, education, laws, infrastructure, medicine, and at its core, food and water.

 

(5-15 minutes)

 

Mini-Lesson: Teacher explains that having enough, in fact, more than enough, a surplus, of food and water is a necessary first step before any civilization anywhere invents anything. So when did humans first have enough food and water to start inventing? The Neolithic Revolution - in 11,000 BCE, humans began farming for the first time. A more technical term for farming is “domestication” – when you choose which seeds you want to plant and which animals you want to breed. They had to live next to really big rivers where the soil was wet enough to farm too.

 

Handout: Diagram of Neolithic Revolution  - read through with students so they can see how one geographic feature (rivers) leads to complex civilization. Check for understanding along the way using the thumbs up = I understand, thumb horizontal = kind of understand, and down = I don’t know why. Encourage students to ask/write questions and then write the answers. (5-10 minutes)

 

Explain To Class: So let’s call this our claim:

 

“The Neolithic Revolution was positive because humans had food for large populations to invent goods”.

 

Poll the class – who would agree with this? (presumably, most raise their hands, if not, it’s a good transition into the next segment). But is there a counterclaim to this? Can we view the Neolithic Revolution in a negative way too? Ask students to predict (out loud) why the Neolithic Revolution could be negative.

(3-5 minutes)

 

Handout: Excerpt from Jared Diamond. Students will read through as a class and SCUBA, annotating for Diamonds claims, arguments, and evidence. (5-10 minutes)

 

Handout: Regents Multiple Choice Questions with River Valley Civilizations on them.

(5 minutes)

 

Going over Multiple Choice Questions: As teacher goes from questions to question, ask students to hold up their fingers to correspond with the answer they chose, if there are disagreements, get students to explain to each other why they chose certain answers, and then ask students with different answers if they want to respond to what was said or change their answer. (5 minutes)

 

Time Permitting or as Do Now for the next day

Independent Writing: Have students return to their Questions and Predictions chart from yesterday and write any answers they now have to their questions, and write if any of their predictions were incorrect. (10 minutes)Neolithic Revolution Lesson Plan 2: Claims and Counterclaims

 

 

Objectives:

  • Students will practice logical reasoning to deduce what it takes to make a cell phone
  • Students will read a diagram showing cause and effect
  • Students will practice reading using the SCUBA method
  • Students will practice annotating for claims, arguments, and evidence
  • Students will practice multiple choice questions
  • Students will speak and listen to each other’s explanations

 

Common Core Standards Addressed:

 

Writing (9-10)

  1. Persuasive Texts: Write arguments to support claims, using analysis and evidence.
  2. Explanatory Texts: Write informative/explanatory texts.
  3. Narratives: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.
  4. Clarity: Produce clear/coherent writing appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  5. Revision Process: Develop/strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, rewriting.
  6. Technology: Use technology/Internet, to produce, publish, and update writing products.
  7. Research: Short/sustained research to answer a question or solve a problem
  8. Sources: Gather information from and assess multiple print and digital sources
  9. Sources: Use evidence from literary/informational texts for analysis, reflection, research.
  10. Writing: Routinely over short and extended time frames for tasks, purposes, audiences.

 

Reading (9-10)

  1.   Evidence: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of the text and your inferences.
  2.   Thesis: Determine and summarize a central idea of a text and analyze its development
  3.   Development:

I: Analyze how (order, introduction, connection) the author unfolds analysis.

L: Analyze how complex characters develop, interact, and advance plot in a text.

  1.   Word Usage: Determine figurative, connotative, and technical meaning of words/phrases
  2.   Development of Thesis:
  1. Analyze how an author’s ideas/claims are developed and refined

L. Analyze how authors create mystery, tension, or surprise using structure, order of events, and manipulation of time.

  1. Author’s Point of View:
  1. Determine author’s POV/purpose and how rhetoric advances it

L. Analyze a POV/cultural experience in a work from outside the USA

  1. Various points of view: Analyze and compare accounts of a subject in different mediums including what is present or absent in each
  2. Evaluating the author: Delineate/evaluate reasoning of arguments/claims and if the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
  3. Historical Texts:
  1. Analyze related themes and concepts in historical/literary documents.

L. Analyze how an author draws on/transforms source material in a work 

 

Speaking - Listening (9-10)

  1.   Types of Discussions: Collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
    1. Preparation for Discussions: Read and research material under study; refer to evidence from texts and other research to stimulate well-reasoned discussion.
    2. Rules for discussions: Set rules for discussions, decision-making, goals, deadlines, and roles with peers.
    3. Discussions: Pose and respond to questions, incorporate other people, and clarify, verify, and challenge ideas to propel discussions.
    4. Responses: Respond to perspectives, summarize agreement and disagreement, and qualify or justify your own views to make new connections using evidence and reasoning.
  2.   Sources used in presentations: Use and evaluate the credibility/accuracy of multiple sources in diverse media or formats.
  3.   Point of View of the Speaker: Evaluate a speaker’s POV/reasoning/evidence/rhetoric; identify fallacious reasoning or exaggerated/distorted evidence.
  4.   Coherence of Presentation: Present clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and it is appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  5.   Use of multi-media: Make strategic use of digital media in presentations.
  6. Adaptation: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks

 

Language (Grades 9-10)

 

  1. Grammar: Demonstrate conventions of grammar and usage when writing/speaking using parallel structure, various phrases and clauses
  2. Conventions: Command of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing
  3. Language Function: Make effective choices for meaning or style.
  4. Style Guidelines: Write and edit work to a style manual appropriate for the discipline and writing type.
  5. Meaning of words: Use context clues to determine/clarify word meanings.
  6. Word Changes: Identify and use word changes/morphs that indicate different meanings.
  7. Pronunciation: Research word pronunciation and meaning/part of speech/etymology
  8. Checking word meaning predictions: Verify word meaning with other sources
  9. Figurative Language: Understand figurative language, word relationships, word nuances, and figures of speech while analyzing their role in the text.
  10. Academic and domain-specific language: Acquire/use general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------

Aim: How did the Neolithic Revolution cause the development of civilization?

 

Do Now: What do you need to make a cell phone?

(2-5 minutes)

 

  • Teacher holds up their cell phone and poses this question to students.
  • They must first brainstorm on their own, writing a list of things one would need to create a cell phone.

 

Share out: After thinking and writing on their own, teacher leads students in a share out. Each student contributes one thing to the list.

 

  • What the students don’t realize is that their lists are very incomplete
  • Teacher should ask them probing questions to get them to add more to the list. If they say “you need metal” the teacher would ask “ok, so what do people need to get the metal?” looking for students to say “workers”, or “machines” or “shovels” and then the teacher can ask “ok, so who makes the shovels/machines?” or “how do the workers GET TO the mine?”
  • The teacher is leading students to realize that to make a cell phone, it requires the materials, but also money, government, education, laws, infrastructure, medicine, and at its core, food and water.

 

(5-15 minutes)

 

Mini-Lesson: Teacher explains that having enough, in fact, more than enough, a surplus, of food and water is a necessary first step before any civilization anywhere invents anything. So when did humans first have enough food and water to start inventing? The Neolithic Revolution - in 11,000 BCE, humans began farming for the first time. A more technical term for farming is “domestication” – when you choose which seeds you want to plant and which animals you want to breed. They had to live next to really big rivers where the soil was wet enough to farm too.

 

Handout: Diagram of Neolithic Revolution  - read through with students so they can see how one geographic feature (rivers) leads to complex civilization. Check for understanding along the way using the thumbs up = I understand, thumb horizontal = kind of understand, and down = I don’t know why. Encourage students to ask/write questions and then write the answers. (5-10 minutes)

 

Explain To Class: So let’s call this our claim:

 

“The Neolithic Revolution was positive because humans had food for large populations to invent goods”.

 

Poll the class – who would agree with this? (presumably, most raise their hands, if not, it’s a good transition into the next segment). But is there a counterclaim to this? Can we view the Neolithic Revolution in a negative way too? Ask students to predict (out loud) why the Neolithic Revolution could be negative.

(3-5 minutes)

 

Handout: Excerpt from Jared Diamond. Students will read through as a class and SCUBA, annotating for Diamonds claims, arguments, and evidence. (5-10 minutes)

 

Handout: Regents Multiple Choice Questions with River Valley Civilizations on them.

(5 minutes)

 

Going over Multiple Choice Questions: As teacher goes from questions to question, ask students to hold up their fingers to correspond with the answer they chose, if there are disagreements, get students to explain to each other why they chose certain answers, and then ask students with different answers if they want to respond to what was said or change their answer. (5 minutes)

 

Time Permitting or as Do Now for the next day

Independent Writing: Have students return to their Questions and Predictions chart from yesterday and write any answers they now have to their questions, and write if any of their predictions were incorrect. (10 minutes)Neolithic Revolution Lesson Plan 2: Claims and Counterclaims

 

 

Objectives:

  • Students will practice logical reasoning to deduce what it takes to make a cell phone
  • Students will read a diagram showing cause and effect
  • Students will practice reading using the SCUBA method
  • Students will practice annotating for claims, arguments, and evidence
  • Students will practice multiple choice questions
  • Students will speak and listen to each other’s explanations

 

Common Core Standards Addressed:

 

Writing (9-10)

  1. Persuasive Texts: Write arguments to support claims, using analysis and evidence.
  2. Explanatory Texts: Write informative/explanatory texts.
  3. Narratives: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.
  4. Clarity: Produce clear/coherent writing appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  5. Revision Process: Develop/strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, rewriting.
  6. Technology: Use technology/Internet, to produce, publish, and update writing products.
  7. Research: Short/sustained research to answer a question or solve a problem
  8. Sources: Gather information from and assess multiple print and digital sources
  9. Sources: Use evidence from literary/informational texts for analysis, reflection, research.
  10. Writing: Routinely over short and extended time frames for tasks, purposes, audiences.

 

Reading (9-10)

  1.   Evidence: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of the text and your inferences.
  2.   Thesis: Determine and summarize a central idea of a text and analyze its development
  3.   Development:

I: Analyze how (order, introduction, connection) the author unfolds analysis.

L: Analyze how complex characters develop, interact, and advance plot in a text.

  1.   Word Usage: Determine figurative, connotative, and technical meaning of words/phrases
  2.   Development of Thesis:
  1. Analyze how an author’s ideas/claims are developed and refined

L. Analyze how authors create mystery, tension, or surprise using structure, order of events, and manipulation of time.

  1. Author’s Point of View:
  1. Determine author’s POV/purpose and how rhetoric advances it

L. Analyze a POV/cultural experience in a work from outside the USA

  1. Various points of view: Analyze and compare accounts of a subject in different mediums including what is present or absent in each
  2. Evaluating the author: Delineate/evaluate reasoning of arguments/claims and if the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
  3. Historical Texts:
  1. Analyze related themes and concepts in historical/literary documents.

L. Analyze how an author draws on/transforms source material in a work 

 

Speaking - Listening (9-10)

  1.   Types of Discussions: Collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
    1. Preparation for Discussions: Read and research material under study; refer to evidence from texts and other research to stimulate well-reasoned discussion.
    2. Rules for discussions: Set rules for discussions, decision-making, goals, deadlines, and roles with peers.
    3. Discussions: Pose and respond to questions, incorporate other people, and clarify, verify, and challenge ideas to propel discussions.
    4. Responses: Respond to perspectives, summarize agreement and disagreement, and qualify or justify your own views to make new connections using evidence and reasoning.
  2.   Sources used in presentations: Use and evaluate the credibility/accuracy of multiple sources in diverse media or formats.
  3.   Point of View of the Speaker: Evaluate a speaker’s POV/reasoning/evidence/rhetoric; identify fallacious reasoning or exaggerated/distorted evidence.
  4.   Coherence of Presentation: Present clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and it is appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  5.   Use of multi-media: Make strategic use of digital media in presentations.
  6. Adaptation: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks

 

Language (Grades 9-10)

 

  1. Grammar: Demonstrate conventions of grammar and usage when writing/speaking using parallel structure, various phrases and clauses
  2. Conventions: Command of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing
  3. Language Function: Make effective choices for meaning or style.
  4. Style Guidelines: Write and edit work to a style manual appropriate for the discipline and writing type.
  5. Meaning of words: Use context clues to determine/clarify word meanings.
  6. Word Changes: Identify and use word changes/morphs that indicate different meanings.
  7. Pronunciation: Research word pronunciation and meaning/part of speech/etymology
  8. Checking word meaning predictions: Verify word meaning with other sources
  9. Figurative Language: Understand figurative language, word relationships, word nuances, and figures of speech while analyzing their role in the text.
  10. Academic and domain-specific language: Acquire/use general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------

Aim: How did the Neolithic Revolution cause the development of civilization?

 

Do Now: What do you need to make a cell phone?

(2-5 minutes)

 

  • Teacher holds up their cell phone and poses this question to students.
  • They must first brainstorm on their own, writing a list of things one would need to create a cell phone.

 

Share out: After thinking and writing on their own, teacher leads students in a share out. Each student contributes one thing to the list.

 

  • What the students don’t realize is that their lists are very incomplete
  • Teacher should ask them probing questions to get them to add more to the list. If they say “you need metal” the teacher would ask “ok, so what do people need to get the metal?” looking for students to say “workers”, or “machines” or “shovels” and then the teacher can ask “ok, so who makes the shovels/machines?” or “how do the workers GET TO the mine?”
  • The teacher is leading students to realize that to make a cell phone, it requires the materials, but also money, government, education, laws, infrastructure, medicine, and at its core, food and water.

 

(5-15 minutes)

 

Mini-Lesson: Teacher explains that having enough, in fact, more than enough, a surplus, of food and water is a necessary first step before any civilization anywhere invents anything. So when did humans first have enough food and water to start inventing? The Neolithic Revolution - in 11,000 BCE, humans began farming for the first time. A more technical term for farming is “domestication” – when you choose which seeds you want to plant and which animals you want to breed. They had to live next to really big rivers where the soil was wet enough to farm too.

 

Handout: Diagram of Neolithic Revolution  - read through with students so they can see how one geographic feature (rivers) leads to complex civilization. Check for understanding along the way using the thumbs up = I understand, thumb horizontal = kind of understand, and down = I don’t know why. Encourage students to ask/write questions and then write the answers. (5-10 minutes)

 

Explain To Class: So let’s call this our claim:

 

“The Neolithic Revolution was positive because humans had food for large populations to invent goods”.

 

Poll the class – who would agree with this? (presumably, most raise their hands, if not, it’s a good transition into the next segment). But is there a counterclaim to this? Can we view the Neolithic Revolution in a negative way too? Ask students to predict (out loud) why the Neolithic Revolution could be negative.

(3-5 minutes)

 

Handout: Excerpt from Jared Diamond. Students will read through as a class and SCUBA, annotating for Diamonds claims, arguments, and evidence. (5-10 minutes)

 

Handout: Regents Multiple Choice Questions with River Valley Civilizations on them.

(5 minutes)

 

Going over Multiple Choice Questions: As teacher goes from questions to question, ask students to hold up their fingers to correspond with the answer they chose, if there are disagreements, get students to explain to each other why they chose certain answers, and then ask students with different answers if they want to respond to what was said or change their answer. (5 minutes)

 

Time Permitting or as Do Now for the next day

Independent Writing: Have students return to their Questions and Predictions chart from yesterday and write any answers they now have to their questions, and write if any of their predictions were incorrect. (10 minutes)

 

Wednesday Lesson Plan

 

Name___________________________                                      Date_____________________

 

Hammurabi’s Code and Character Goals

 

Historical Context: King Hammurabi ruled over the Babylonian Empire located along the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers in the 1700s BC. He created the Hammurabi Code - one of the oldest, written set of laws. These laws show us what King Hammurabi of Babylon valued and how he intended to control his kingdom.

 

Directions: After reading these laws, you will analyze the Code through one of the 4 lenses below. Each lens is some of the character and consciousness goals listed below. Choose one and apply it to Hammurabi’s Code in the way described.

 

  1. Empathy – Imagine you are a citizen of Ancient Babylon. You live under the laws of King Hammurabi. Choose the 15 laws that would have impacted people most often in their daily lives. For each law you choose, explain why it was so important to Babylonians and explain why it makes sense the way it is written.

 

Example: In Ancient Babylon, Law ____ of Hammurabi’s Code had a good purpose. It applied to most people because _____________, and it makes sense the way it was written because _________________.

 

  1. Researching – Hammurabi’s Code has many laws that are outdated and would not work today. But some of them are still seen in many modern societies. First, choose the laws that you think might still be used in today’s society. Then do some research about if any laws like them exist in modern-day countries. You must find at least 10 of his laws that show up in today’s societies – a city, country, or region - wherever you can find them. You must cite the sources for your information and explain if they might be biased.

 

Example: Law ____ of Hammurabi’s Code states that ____________. This law can be seen in the country called ______________. Their law states that ______________ and this is similar to Hammurabi’s Law number _____ because ______________.

 

  1. Logical reasoning and Synthesizing – Laws are usually consequences for people’s bad actions.  They are usually logical – they are based on causes and effects. If a person does X, then Y will happen. But sometimes we can ask about exceptions, or situations that aren’t exactly what the law says. Many of the laws in Hammurabi’s Code are kind of short – they don’t consider other situations that aren’t written down. Choose 10 laws that you think are flawed (have logical problems), explain how each one is flawed (situations where it isn’t clear enough), and then explain extra details you could synthesize with each law to make it work in all situations.

 

Example: Law ______ of Hammurabi’s Code has a flaw. The problem is that it doesn’t consider if ___________ happened. If _________ happened, the law doesn’t explain what would happen to you. A way to make it more complete would be adding the words or phrase ______________. If you added that, it would fix the problem because ______________________.

 

  1. Confidence and Presentation – imagine you are King Hammurabi. You finished deciding on 282 new laws for Babylon. Your scribes have made a 7-foot high stone tablet with the 282 laws written on it. You are planning to unveil this tablet in the center of Babylon. Write a speech explaining the general purpose of the laws (why we need a written set of laws for Babylon), how they will help Babylon be a better society (again, in general, why laws will help us improve Babylon), and explain the 15 most important laws as examples. For each of the laws you choose, you must explain how it will help make Babylon a better society. 

Bill Nobles

Upcoming Events

8-14-17 to 8-18-17 Lesson Plans

World History  Neolithic Revolution Lesson 1 – Questions and Predictions

 

Objectives:

 

  • Students will work independently and collaboratively to generate questions about the topic
  • Students will work independently and collaboratively to generate predictions about the topic
  • Students will practice listening and note-taking skills

 

Common Core Standards:

 

Writing (9-10)

  1. Persuasive Texts: Write arguments to support claims, using analysis and evidence.
  2. Explanatory Texts: Write informative/explanatory texts.
  3. Narratives: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.
  4. Clarity: Produce clear/coherent writing appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  5. Revision Process: Develop/strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, rewriting.
  6. Technology: Use technology/Internet, to produce, publish, and update writing products.
  7. Research: Short/sustained research to answer a question or solve a problem
  8. Sources: Gather information from and assess multiple print and digital sources
  9. Sources: Use evidence from literary/informational texts for analysis, reflection, research.
  10. Writing: Routinely over short and extended time frames for tasks, purposes, audiences.

 

Reading (9-10)

  1.   Evidence: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of the text and your inferences.
  2.   Thesis: Determine and summarize a central idea of a text and analyze its development
  3.   Development:

I: Analyze how (order, introduction, connection) the author unfolds analysis.

L: Analyze how complex characters develop, interact, and advance plot in a text.

  1.   Word Usage: Determine figurative, connotative, and technical meaning of words/phrases
  2.   Development of Thesis:
  1. Analyze how an author’s ideas/claims are developed and refined

L. Analyze how authors create mystery, tension, or surprise using structure, order of events, and manipulation of time.

  1. Author’s Point of View:
  1. Determine author’s POV/purpose and how rhetoric advances it

L. Analyze a POV/cultural experience in a work from outside the USA

  1. Various points of view: Analyze and compare accounts of a subject in different mediums including what is present or absent in each
  2. Evaluating the author: Delineate/evaluate reasoning of arguments/claims and if the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
  3. Historical Texts:         
  1. Analyze related themes and concepts in historical/literary documents.

L. Analyze how an author draws on/transforms source material in a work 

 

Speaking - Listening (9-10)

  1.   Types of Discussions: Collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
    1. Preparation for Discussions: Read and research material under study; refer to evidence from texts and other research to stimulate well-reasoned discussion.
    2. Rules for discussions: Set rules for discussions, decision-making, goals, deadlines, and roles with peers.
    3. Discussions: Pose and respond to questions, incorporate other people, and clarify, verify, and challenge ideas to propel discussions.
    4. Responses: Respond to perspectives, summarize agreement and disagreement, and qualify or justify your own views to make new connections using evidence and reasoning.
  2.   Sources used in presentations: Use and evaluate the credibility/accuracy of multiple sources in diverse media or formats.
  3.   Point of View of the Speaker: Evaluate a speaker’s POV/reasoning/evidence/rhetoric; identify fallacious reasoning or exaggerated/distorted evidence.
  4.   Coherence of Presentation: Present clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and it is appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  5.   Use of multi-media: Make strategic use of digital media in presentations.
  6. Adaptation: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks

 

Language (Grades 9-10)

 

  1. Grammar: Demonstrate conventions of grammar and usage when writing/speaking using parallel structure, various phrases and clauses
  2. Conventions: Command of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing
  3. Language Function: Make effective choices for meaning or style.
  4. Style Guidelines: Write and edit work to a style manual appropriate for the discipline and writing type.
  5. Meaning of words: Use context clues to determine/clarify word meanings.
  6. Word Changes: Identify and use word changes/morphs that indicate different meanings.
  7. Pronunciation: Research word pronunciation and meaning/part of speech/etymology
  8. Checking word meaning predictions: Verify word meaning with other sources
  9. Figurative Language: Understand figurative language, word relationships, word nuances, and figures of speech while analyzing their role in the text.
  10. Academic and domain-specific language: Acquire/use general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

 

----------------------------------

Aim: How can we brainstorm questions and predictions about the Neolithic Revolution?

 

Do Now: What does the term “revolution” mean? Explain it 2 different ways on paper. (ways can mean two different sentences/explanations, or one using text/language and another using picture or image). (5 minutes)

 

On Board: First 3 students to finish come to the board and write/draw their best explanation

 

Have class turn to the people next to them and explain what they wrote by either having the person read it, or by explaining it a third way (out loud, saying something different from what you wrote/drew). (5 minutes)

 

Go over the term with students. Use what is written on the board and what people chime in by hand-raising to construct a working definition – that can be many sentences long – of a “revolution”. (5 minutes)

 

Ask the class – does anyone know what the word “Neolithic” might mean?

 

Someone might say something about “new”. If so, tell them they are right and it meant the New Stone Age.

 

On Board: Neolithic

                      ||      ||

                 new    stone

 

So thinking about what we know about revolution and what we now know about Neolithic, let’s make a list of questions we have about the Neolithic Revolution. (5 minutes)

 

Questions: Have students take out the list of “Questions Historians Ask about Events” and use it to brainstorm Neolithic Revolution specific questions into their Questions/Predictions Sheet. They are allowed to steal questions from others, but they need to have 1:2 ratio of questions they write to questions others write. (15 minutes)

 

Predictions: As a whole class, we can brainstorm some predictions based on our questions. We should fill this in as a class, with students taking credit for their words by allowing us all to cite them as the source of the prediction. We get 10 of them into the sheet. (10 minutes)

 

 

 

Neolithic Revolution Lesson Plan 2: Claims and Counterclaims

 

Objectives:

  • Students will practice logical reasoning to deduce what it takes to make a cell phone
  • Students will read a diagram showing cause and effect
  • Students will practice reading using the SCUBA method
  • Students will practice annotating for claims, arguments, and evidence
  • Students will practice multiple choice questions
  • Students will speak and listen to each other’s explanations

 

Common Core Standards Addressed:

 

Writing (9-10)

  1. Persuasive Texts: Write arguments to support claims, using analysis and evidence.
  2. Explanatory Texts: Write informative/explanatory texts.
  3. Narratives: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.
  4. Clarity: Produce clear/coherent writing appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  5. Revision Process: Develop/strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, rewriting.
  6. Technology: Use technology/Internet, to produce, publish, and update writing products.
  7. Research: Short/sustained research to answer a question or solve a problem
  8. Sources: Gather information from and assess multiple print and digital sources
  9. Sources: Use evidence from literary/informational texts for analysis, reflection, research.
  10. Writing: Routinely over short and extended time frames for tasks, purposes, audiences.

 

Reading (9-10)

  1.   Evidence: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of the text and your inferences.
  2.   Thesis: Determine and summarize a central idea of a text and analyze its development
  3.   Development:

I: Analyze how (order, introduction, connection) the author unfolds analysis.

L: Analyze how complex characters develop, interact, and advance plot in a text.

  1.   Word Usage: Determine figurative, connotative, and technical meaning of words/phrases
  2.   Development of Thesis:
  1. Analyze how an author’s ideas/claims are developed and refined

L. Analyze how authors create mystery, tension, or surprise using structure, order of events, and manipulation of time.

  1. Author’s Point of View:
  1. Determine author’s POV/purpose and how rhetoric advances it

L. Analyze a POV/cultural experience in a work from outside the USA

  1. Various points of view: Analyze and compare accounts of a subject in different mediums including what is present or absent in each
  2. Evaluating the author: Delineate/evaluate reasoning of arguments/claims and if the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
  3. Historical Texts:
  1. Analyze related themes and concepts in historical/literary documents.

L. Analyze how an author draws on/transforms source material in a work 

 

Speaking - Listening (9-10)

  1.   Types of Discussions: Collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
    1. Preparation for Discussions: Read and research material under study; refer to evidence from texts and other research to stimulate well-reasoned discussion.
    2. Rules for discussions: Set rules for discussions, decision-making, goals, deadlines, and roles with peers.
    3. Discussions: Pose and respond to questions, incorporate other people, and clarify, verify, and challenge ideas to propel discussions.
    4. Responses: Respond to perspectives, summarize agreement and disagreement, and qualify or justify your own views to make new connections using evidence and reasoning.
  2.   Sources used in presentations: Use and evaluate the credibility/accuracy of multiple sources in diverse media or formats.
  3.   Point of View of the Speaker: Evaluate a speaker’s POV/reasoning/evidence/rhetoric; identify fallacious reasoning or exaggerated/distorted evidence.
  4.   Coherence of Presentation: Present clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and it is appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  5.   Use of multi-media: Make strategic use of digital media in presentations.
  6. Adaptation: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks

 

Language (Grades 9-10)

 

  1. Grammar: Demonstrate conventions of grammar and usage when writing/speaking using parallel structure, various phrases and clauses
  2. Conventions: Command of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing
  3. Language Function: Make effective choices for meaning or style.
  4. Style Guidelines: Write and edit work to a style manual appropriate for the discipline and writing type.
  5. Meaning of words: Use context clues to determine/clarify word meanings.
  6. Word Changes: Identify and use word changes/morphs that indicate different meanings.
  7. Pronunciation: Research word pronunciation and meaning/part of speech/etymology
  8. Checking word meaning predictions: Verify word meaning with other sources
  9. Figurative Language: Understand figurative language, word relationships, word nuances, and figures of speech while analyzing their role in the text.
  10. Academic and domain-specific language: Acquire/use general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------

Aim: How did the Neolithic Revolution cause the development of civilization?

 

Do Now: What do you need to make a cell phone?

(2-5 minutes)

 

  • Teacher holds up their cell phone and poses this question to students.
  • They must first brainstorm on their own, writing a list of things one would need to create a cell phone.

 

Share out: After thinking and writing on their own, teacher leads students in a share out. Each student contributes one thing to the list.

 

  • What the students don’t realize is that their lists are very incomplete
  • Teacher should ask them probing questions to get them to add more to the list. If they say “you need metal” the teacher would ask “ok, so what do people need to get the metal?” looking for students to say “workers”, or “machines” or “shovels” and then the teacher can ask “ok, so who makes the shovels/machines?” or “how do the workers GET TO the mine?”
  • The teacher is leading students to realize that to make a cell phone, it requires the materials, but also money, government, education, laws, infrastructure, medicine, and at its core, food and water.

 

(5-15 minutes)

 

Mini-Lesson: Teacher explains that having enough, in fact, more than enough, a surplus, of food and water is a necessary first step before any civilization anywhere invents anything. So when did humans first have enough food and water to start inventing? The Neolithic Revolution - in 11,000 BCE, humans began farming for the first time. A more technical term for farming is “domestication” – when you choose which seeds you want to plant and which animals you want to breed. They had to live next to really big rivers where the soil was wet enough to farm too.

 

Handout: Diagram of Neolithic Revolution  - read through with students so they can see how one geographic feature (rivers) leads to complex civilization. Check for understanding along the way using the thumbs up = I understand, thumb horizontal = kind of understand, and down = I don’t know why. Encourage students to ask/write questions and then write the answers. (5-10 minutes)

 

Explain To Class: So let’s call this our claim:

 

“The Neolithic Revolution was positive because humans had food for large populations to invent goods”.

 

Poll the class – who would agree with this? (presumably, most raise their hands, if not, it’s a good transition into the next segment). But is there a counterclaim to this? Can we view the Neolithic Revolution in a negative way too? Ask students to predict (out loud) why the Neolithic Revolution could be negative.

(3-5 minutes)

 

Handout: Excerpt from Jared Diamond. Students will read through as a class and SCUBA, annotating for Diamonds claims, arguments, and evidence. (5-10 minutes)

 

Handout: Regents Multiple Choice Questions with River Valley Civilizations on them.

(5 minutes)

 

Going over Multiple Choice Questions: As teacher goes from questions to question, ask students to hold up their fingers to correspond with the answer they chose, if there are disagreements, get students to explain to each other why they chose certain answers, and then ask students with different answers if they want to respond to what was said or change their answer. (5 minutes)

 

Time Permitting or as Do Now for the next day

Independent Writing: Have students return to their Questions and Predictions chart from yesterday and write any answers they now have to their questions, and write if any of their predictions were incorrect. (10 minutes)Neolithic Revolution Lesson Plan 2: Claims and Counterclaims

 

 

Objectives:

  • Students will practice logical reasoning to deduce what it takes to make a cell phone
  • Students will read a diagram showing cause and effect
  • Students will practice reading using the SCUBA method
  • Students will practice annotating for claims, arguments, and evidence
  • Students will practice multiple choice questions
  • Students will speak and listen to each other’s explanations

 

Common Core Standards Addressed:

 

Writing (9-10)

  1. Persuasive Texts: Write arguments to support claims, using analysis and evidence.
  2. Explanatory Texts: Write informative/explanatory texts.
  3. Narratives: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.
  4. Clarity: Produce clear/coherent writing appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  5. Revision Process: Develop/strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, rewriting.
  6. Technology: Use technology/Internet, to produce, publish, and update writing products.
  7. Research: Short/sustained research to answer a question or solve a problem
  8. Sources: Gather information from and assess multiple print and digital sources
  9. Sources: Use evidence from literary/informational texts for analysis, reflection, research.
  10. Writing: Routinely over short and extended time frames for tasks, purposes, audiences.

 

Reading (9-10)

  1.   Evidence: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of the text and your inferences.
  2.   Thesis: Determine and summarize a central idea of a text and analyze its development
  3.   Development:

I: Analyze how (order, introduction, connection) the author unfolds analysis.

L: Analyze how complex characters develop, interact, and advance plot in a text.

  1.   Word Usage: Determine figurative, connotative, and technical meaning of words/phrases
  2.   Development of Thesis:
  1. Analyze how an author’s ideas/claims are developed and refined

L. Analyze how authors create mystery, tension, or surprise using structure, order of events, and manipulation of time.

  1. Author’s Point of View:
  1. Determine author’s POV/purpose and how rhetoric advances it

L. Analyze a POV/cultural experience in a work from outside the USA

  1. Various points of view: Analyze and compare accounts of a subject in different mediums including what is present or absent in each
  2. Evaluating the author: Delineate/evaluate reasoning of arguments/claims and if the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
  3. Historical Texts:
  1. Analyze related themes and concepts in historical/literary documents.

L. Analyze how an author draws on/transforms source material in a work 

 

Speaking - Listening (9-10)

  1.   Types of Discussions: Collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
    1. Preparation for Discussions: Read and research material under study; refer to evidence from texts and other research to stimulate well-reasoned discussion.
    2. Rules for discussions: Set rules for discussions, decision-making, goals, deadlines, and roles with peers.
    3. Discussions: Pose and respond to questions, incorporate other people, and clarify, verify, and challenge ideas to propel discussions.
    4. Responses: Respond to perspectives, summarize agreement and disagreement, and qualify or justify your own views to make new connections using evidence and reasoning.
  2.   Sources used in presentations: Use and evaluate the credibility/accuracy of multiple sources in diverse media or formats.
  3.   Point of View of the Speaker: Evaluate a speaker’s POV/reasoning/evidence/rhetoric; identify fallacious reasoning or exaggerated/distorted evidence.
  4.   Coherence of Presentation: Present clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and it is appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  5.   Use of multi-media: Make strategic use of digital media in presentations.
  6. Adaptation: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks

 

Language (Grades 9-10)

 

  1. Grammar: Demonstrate conventions of grammar and usage when writing/speaking using parallel structure, various phrases and clauses
  2. Conventions: Command of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing
  3. Language Function: Make effective choices for meaning or style.
  4. Style Guidelines: Write and edit work to a style manual appropriate for the discipline and writing type.
  5. Meaning of words: Use context clues to determine/clarify word meanings.
  6. Word Changes: Identify and use word changes/morphs that indicate different meanings.
  7. Pronunciation: Research word pronunciation and meaning/part of speech/etymology
  8. Checking word meaning predictions: Verify word meaning with other sources
  9. Figurative Language: Understand figurative language, word relationships, word nuances, and figures of speech while analyzing their role in the text.
  10. Academic and domain-specific language: Acquire/use general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------

Aim: How did the Neolithic Revolution cause the development of civilization?

 

Do Now: What do you need to make a cell phone?

(2-5 minutes)

 

  • Teacher holds up their cell phone and poses this question to students.
  • They must first brainstorm on their own, writing a list of things one would need to create a cell phone.

 

Share out: After thinking and writing on their own, teacher leads students in a share out. Each student contributes one thing to the list.

 

  • What the students don’t realize is that their lists are very incomplete
  • Teacher should ask them probing questions to get them to add more to the list. If they say “you need metal” the teacher would ask “ok, so what do people need to get the metal?” looking for students to say “workers”, or “machines” or “shovels” and then the teacher can ask “ok, so who makes the shovels/machines?” or “how do the workers GET TO the mine?”
  • The teacher is leading students to realize that to make a cell phone, it requires the materials, but also money, government, education, laws, infrastructure, medicine, and at its core, food and water.

 

(5-15 minutes)

 

Mini-Lesson: Teacher explains that having enough, in fact, more than enough, a surplus, of food and water is a necessary first step before any civilization anywhere invents anything. So when did humans first have enough food and water to start inventing? The Neolithic Revolution - in 11,000 BCE, humans began farming for the first time. A more technical term for farming is “domestication” – when you choose which seeds you want to plant and which animals you want to breed. They had to live next to really big rivers where the soil was wet enough to farm too.

 

Handout: Diagram of Neolithic Revolution  - read through with students so they can see how one geographic feature (rivers) leads to complex civilization. Check for understanding along the way using the thumbs up = I understand, thumb horizontal = kind of understand, and down = I don’t know why. Encourage students to ask/write questions and then write the answers. (5-10 minutes)

 

Explain To Class: So let’s call this our claim:

 

“The Neolithic Revolution was positive because humans had food for large populations to invent goods”.

 

Poll the class – who would agree with this? (presumably, most raise their hands, if not, it’s a good transition into the next segment). But is there a counterclaim to this? Can we view the Neolithic Revolution in a negative way too? Ask students to predict (out loud) why the Neolithic Revolution could be negative.

(3-5 minutes)

 

Handout: Excerpt from Jared Diamond. Students will read through as a class and SCUBA, annotating for Diamonds claims, arguments, and evidence. (5-10 minutes)

 

Handout: Regents Multiple Choice Questions with River Valley Civilizations on them.

(5 minutes)

 

Going over Multiple Choice Questions: As teacher goes from questions to question, ask students to hold up their fingers to correspond with the answer they chose, if there are disagreements, get students to explain to each other why they chose certain answers, and then ask students with different answers if they want to respond to what was said or change their answer. (5 minutes)

 

Time Permitting or as Do Now for the next day

Independent Writing: Have students return to their Questions and Predictions chart from yesterday and write any answers they now have to their questions, and write if any of their predictions were incorrect. (10 minutes)Neolithic Revolution Lesson Plan 2: Claims and Counterclaims

 

 

Objectives:

  • Students will practice logical reasoning to deduce what it takes to make a cell phone
  • Students will read a diagram showing cause and effect
  • Students will practice reading using the SCUBA method
  • Students will practice annotating for claims, arguments, and evidence
  • Students will practice multiple choice questions
  • Students will speak and listen to each other’s explanations

 

Common Core Standards Addressed:

 

Writing (9-10)

  1. Persuasive Texts: Write arguments to support claims, using analysis and evidence.
  2. Explanatory Texts: Write informative/explanatory texts.
  3. Narratives: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.
  4. Clarity: Produce clear/coherent writing appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  5. Revision Process: Develop/strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, rewriting.
  6. Technology: Use technology/Internet, to produce, publish, and update writing products.
  7. Research: Short/sustained research to answer a question or solve a problem
  8. Sources: Gather information from and assess multiple print and digital sources
  9. Sources: Use evidence from literary/informational texts for analysis, reflection, research.
  10. Writing: Routinely over short and extended time frames for tasks, purposes, audiences.

 

Reading (9-10)

  1.   Evidence: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of the text and your inferences.
  2.   Thesis: Determine and summarize a central idea of a text and analyze its development
  3.   Development:

I: Analyze how (order, introduction, connection) the author unfolds analysis.

L: Analyze how complex characters develop, interact, and advance plot in a text.

  1.   Word Usage: Determine figurative, connotative, and technical meaning of words/phrases
  2.   Development of Thesis:
  1. Analyze how an author’s ideas/claims are developed and refined

L. Analyze how authors create mystery, tension, or surprise using structure, order of events, and manipulation of time.

  1. Author’s Point of View:
  1. Determine author’s POV/purpose and how rhetoric advances it

L. Analyze a POV/cultural experience in a work from outside the USA

  1. Various points of view: Analyze and compare accounts of a subject in different mediums including what is present or absent in each
  2. Evaluating the author: Delineate/evaluate reasoning of arguments/claims and if the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
  3. Historical Texts:
  1. Analyze related themes and concepts in historical/literary documents.

L. Analyze how an author draws on/transforms source material in a work 

 

Speaking - Listening (9-10)

  1.   Types of Discussions: Collaborative discussions with diverse partners on topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
    1. Preparation for Discussions: Read and research material under study; refer to evidence from texts and other research to stimulate well-reasoned discussion.
    2. Rules for discussions: Set rules for discussions, decision-making, goals, deadlines, and roles with peers.
    3. Discussions: Pose and respond to questions, incorporate other people, and clarify, verify, and challenge ideas to propel discussions.
    4. Responses: Respond to perspectives, summarize agreement and disagreement, and qualify or justify your own views to make new connections using evidence and reasoning.
  2.   Sources used in presentations: Use and evaluate the credibility/accuracy of multiple sources in diverse media or formats.
  3.   Point of View of the Speaker: Evaluate a speaker’s POV/reasoning/evidence/rhetoric; identify fallacious reasoning or exaggerated/distorted evidence.
  4.   Coherence of Presentation: Present clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and it is appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  5.   Use of multi-media: Make strategic use of digital media in presentations.
  6. Adaptation: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks

 

Language (Grades 9-10)

 

  1. Grammar: Demonstrate conventions of grammar and usage when writing/speaking using parallel structure, various phrases and clauses
  2. Conventions: Command of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing
  3. Language Function: Make effective choices for meaning or style.
  4. Style Guidelines: Write and edit work to a style manual appropriate for the discipline and writing type.
  5. Meaning of words: Use context clues to determine/clarify word meanings.
  6. Word Changes: Identify and use word changes/morphs that indicate different meanings.
  7. Pronunciation: Research word pronunciation and meaning/part of speech/etymology
  8. Checking word meaning predictions: Verify word meaning with other sources
  9. Figurative Language: Understand figurative language, word relationships, word nuances, and figures of speech while analyzing their role in the text.
  10. Academic and domain-specific language: Acquire/use general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------

Aim: How did the Neolithic Revolution cause the development of civilization?

 

Do Now: What do you need to make a cell phone?

(2-5 minutes)

 

  • Teacher holds up their cell phone and poses this question to students.
  • They must first brainstorm on their own, writing a list of things one would need to create a cell phone.

 

Share out: After thinking and writing on their own, teacher leads students in a share out. Each student contributes one thing to the list.

 

  • What the students don’t realize is that their lists are very incomplete
  • Teacher should ask them probing questions to get them to add more to the list. If they say “you need metal” the teacher would ask “ok, so what do people need to get the metal?” looking for students to say “workers”, or “machines” or “shovels” and then the teacher can ask “ok, so who makes the shovels/machines?” or “how do the workers GET TO the mine?”
  • The teacher is leading students to realize that to make a cell phone, it requires the materials, but also money, government, education, laws, infrastructure, medicine, and at its core, food and water.

 

(5-15 minutes)

 

Mini-Lesson: Teacher explains that having enough, in fact, more than enough, a surplus, of food and water is a necessary first step before any civilization anywhere invents anything. So when did humans first have enough food and water to start inventing? The Neolithic Revolution - in 11,000 BCE, humans began farming for the first time. A more technical term for farming is “domestication” – when you choose which seeds you want to plant and which animals you want to breed. They had to live next to really big rivers where the soil was wet enough to farm too.

 

Handout: Diagram of Neolithic Revolution  - read through with students so they can see how one geographic feature (rivers) leads to complex civilization. Check for understanding along the way using the thumbs up = I understand, thumb horizontal = kind of understand, and down = I don’t know why. Encourage students to ask/write questions and then write the answers. (5-10 minutes)

 

Explain To Class: So let’s call this our claim:

 

“The Neolithic Revolution was positive because humans had food for large populations to invent goods”.

 

Poll the class – who would agree with this? (presumably, most raise their hands, if not, it’s a good transition into the next segment). But is there a counterclaim to this? Can we view the Neolithic Revolution in a negative way too? Ask students to predict (out loud) why the Neolithic Revolution could be negative.

(3-5 minutes)

 

Handout: Excerpt from Jared Diamond. Students will read through as a class and SCUBA, annotating for Diamonds claims, arguments, and evidence. (5-10 minutes)

 

Handout: Regents Multiple Choice Questions with River Valley Civilizations on them.

(5 minutes)

 

Going over Multiple Choice Questions: As teacher goes from questions to question, ask students to hold up their fingers to correspond with the answer they chose, if there are disagreements, get students to explain to each other why they chose certain answers, and then ask students with different answers if they want to respond to what was said or change their answer. (5 minutes)

 

Time Permitting or as Do Now for the next day

Independent Writing: Have students return to their Questions and Predictions chart from yesterday and write any answers they now have to their questions, and write if any of their predictions were incorrect. (10 minutes)

 

Wednesday Lesson Plan

 

Name___________________________                                      Date_____________________

 

Hammurabi’s Code and Character Goals

 

Historical Context: King Hammurabi ruled over the Babylonian Empire located along the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers in the 1700s BC. He created the Hammurabi Code - one of the oldest, written set of laws. These laws show us what King Hammurabi of Babylon valued and how he intended to control his kingdom.

 

Directions: After reading these laws, you will analyze the Code through one of the 4 lenses below. Each lens is some of the character and consciousness goals listed below. Choose one and apply it to Hammurabi’s Code in the way described.

 

  1. Empathy – Imagine you are a citizen of Ancient Babylon. You live under the laws of King Hammurabi. Choose the 15 laws that would have impacted people most often in their daily lives. For each law you choose, explain why it was so important to Babylonians and explain why it makes sense the way it is written.

 

Example: In Ancient Babylon, Law ____ of Hammurabi’s Code had a good purpose. It applied to most people because _____________, and it makes sense the way it was written because _________________.

 

  1. Researching – Hammurabi’s Code has many laws that are outdated and would not work today. But some of them are still seen in many modern societies. First, choose the laws that you think might still be used in today’s society. Then do some research about if any laws like them exist in modern-day countries. You must find at least 10 of his laws that show up in today’s societies – a city, country, or region - wherever you can find them. You must cite the sources for your information and explain if they might be biased.

 

Example: Law ____ of Hammurabi’s Code states that ____________. This law can be seen in the country called ______________. Their law states that ______________ and this is similar to Hammurabi’s Law number _____ because ______________.

 

  1. Logical reasoning and Synthesizing – Laws are usually consequences for people’s bad actions.  They are usually logical – they are based on causes and effects. If a person does X, then Y will happen. But sometimes we can ask about exceptions, or situations that aren’t exactly what the law says. Many of the laws in Hammurabi’s Code are kind of short – they don’t consider other situations that aren’t written down. Choose 10 laws that you think are flawed (have logical problems), explain how each one is flawed (situations where it isn’t clear enough), and then explain extra details you could synthesize with each law to make it work in all situations.

 

Example: Law ______ of Hammurabi’s Code has a flaw. The problem is that it doesn’t consider if ___________ happened. If _________ happened, the law doesn’t explain what would happen to you. A way to make it more complete would be adding the words or phrase ______________. If you added that, it would fix the problem because ______________________.

 

  1. Confidence and Presentation – imagine you are King Hammurabi. You finished deciding on 282 new laws for Babylon. Your scribes have made a 7-foot high stone tablet with the 282 laws written on it. You are planning to unveil this tablet in the center of Babylon. Write a speech explaining the general purpose of the laws (why we need a written set of laws for Babylon), how they will help Babylon be a better society (again, in general, why laws will help us improve Babylon), and explain the 15 most important laws as examples. For each of the laws you choose, you must explain how it will help make Babylon a better society. 

Contact Bill Nobles

Cell Phone:
918-931-1905