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Bill Nobles

Welcome to my online classroom.

Lesson Plans are located in my announcements, thank you.

Bill Nobles Lesson Plans World History

World History and Government Lesson Plans 2/20 to 2/23

World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 2/20 to Friday 2/23

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page. 

 

 

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 20

 

Description

This lesson will analyze how the two party system has affected American history.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Understand the origins of political parties in the United States.
  2. Identify and describe the three periods of single party domination and describe the current era of divided government.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the Venn graphic organizer in the text, p. 94-102.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

 

2. Bellringer: Students will view the two party symbols in a Thomas Nast Political cartoon and write down the qualities associated with these animals. Discussion will be based on these and what students believe Nast’s purpose was using these two principals.

3. Introduce topic: Analyzing political parties through political cartoons.

4. Students will read Ch. 5 Section 2 and complete the political cartoon worksheet.

5. Students will discuss the last question on the worksheet on the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 might affect party balance and how events such as new technology, major historical events and cultural change can affect attitudes about political parties.

 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the political party worksheet.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 21

 

Description

This lesson is designed to suffrage rights, voting requirements, and the historical relationship between voting and Civil Rights.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

            7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under

the law.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Examine the reasons for expansion of voting rights.

2. Analyze how voting qualification have changed over time.

3. Identify historical barriers and voter discrimination trends that have affected African-Americans historically.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Organize the class into three groups and assign each group a section from the chapter.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students groups will create a presentation detailing the main points of the section.

3. As the groups give their presentations they will create a study guide on the Smart Board outlining each section’s main points.

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on class presentations

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Noble

Thursday, Feb. 23

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 23

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 16

 

Description

This lesson the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will complete required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the exam

World History and Government Lesson Plans 2/06 to 2/09

ThLesson Plans 4/12-4/15

World History The Cold War
Origins

After working together to defeat the Axis Powers in Europe and in the Pacific, relations between the Soviet Union and its western Allies quickly soured. The first cracks in the relationship appeared before the war ended at the Potsdam Conference, where Allied leaders found common ground on the future of Germany but clashed over Soviet demands for friendly "buffer" states between it and its enemy in two devastating world wars. This hairline fracture soon became a gaping chasm as East and West sought to shore up allies, first in Europe and then in Asia, Africa and Latin America. It was, in fact, in the Third World, which was emerging from centuries of European domination, that the Cold War became "hot." Unwilling to risk the nuclear Armageddon that a direct conflict would surely bring, the superpowers instead focused their military efforts on establishing friendly states around the globe. So while the poles of the Cold War were centered in the US and Soviet Union, the magnetic field of the conflict encompassed the entire world. It is this global nature of the conflict that provides the context for the unit's essential question: How did Cold War tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union impact the economic, social and political development of former European colonies in the Third World?

 

 

 

Tuesday and Wednesday

Objectives: 1) Compare and contrast the causes and courses of World Wars I and II; 2) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II; 3) Explain the United States' policy of containment

Class Work: Document-Based Question; paragraph writing; guided reading

 

Thursday

Objectives: 1) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II;

Class Work: Guided note-taking on movie, Atomic Cafe

 

Friday

Objectives: 1) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II; 2) Analyze the role of nuclear weapons in keeping the conflict between the US and USSR "cold"

Class Work: Guided note-taking on movie; Analyze political cartoon

 

Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 6

 

Description

This lesson is designed to examine the formal amendment process for the U.S. Constitution

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 2: The student will describe the historic and philosophical foundations of the United States republican system of government.

            6. Analyze the steps of the constitutional amendment process including examples of recent attempts to amend the United States Constitution as exemplified in the issues of the Equal Rights Amendment and flag desecration.  

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Compare the process of ratification of amendments by studying charts.
  2. Identify the four different ways by which the Constitution may be changed.
  3. Understand that while many amendments have been proposed, only a select group has been ratified.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the graphic organizer in the text, p. 79-83.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Introduction of the topic: the students will be informed that today the class will discuss the formal amendment process. The discussion will center around the following discussion questions; A. What has been the most often used method for ratification and why?  B. How many of the amendments were ratified this way? C. What method was used to ratify the 21st Amendment and why?  D. Describe the other two methods for ratification.  
3. Students will read the section.

4.  Class discussion.

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the class discussion.

 

 

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 7

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how basic legislation has added to our understanding of the Constitution over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the executive and legislative branches have interpreted the Constitution.

3. Analyze the role of party practices and custom in interpreting the Constitution.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will read the section, p. 85-88, then complete the cause and effect chart on p. 85.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will identify and discuss the five methods in which change occurs.

4. Students will hand in their cause and effects charts as an assessment. 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their completion of the graphic organizer on p. 85. This is a two column cause and effect chart that must include separate items for each column.

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Thursday, Feb. 08

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how basic legislation has added to our understanding of the Constitution over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the executive and legislative branches have interpreted the Constitution.

3. Analyze the role of party practices and custom in interpreting the Constitution.

 

 

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will re-read the section, p. 85-88, then finish the cause and effect chart on p. 85.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will identify and discuss the five methods in which change occurs.

4. Students will hand in their cause and effects charts as an assessment. 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their completion of the graphic organizer on p. 85. This is a two column cause and effect chart that must include separate items for each column.

 

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 09

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how federal and state governments interact and share powers over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the Federal and State governments use expressed and implied powers.

 

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will read the section, p. 90-95, then engage in discussion.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will discuss the use of implied and expressed powers at the State and Federal levels.

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their response to discussion questions.

World History and Government Lesson Plans 1/22 to 1/26

World History

World War II

Monday-The Home Front

During World War II African Americans found themselves with conflicting feelings about supporting the war effort when their own country did not offer them the freedom America was fighting for overseas.   The Double Victory - Double V - campaign, begun by the Pittsburgh Courier newspaper in 1942, helped to address this issue.  It encouraged African Americans to participate at every level in winning the war abroad, while simultaneously fighting for their civil rights at home.

Tuesday-Nazism and Fascism

Between 1933 and 1945, Nazi Germany and its collaborators pursued a program to systematically persecute and destroy six million Jews. Nazi ideology identified other enemies; they were targeted for racial, ethnic or political reasons.

During this lesson, high school students will understand the German National Socialism (Nazi) extermination campaign against European Jewry and other targeted groups within the context of World War II history; appraise responses to the Holocaust by governments and individuals; reflect on racism and stereotyping; and reflect on responsibility and remembrance

Wednesday-D Day

General Dwight D. Eisenhower wrote his “order of the day” on D-Day, the Allied invasion of France, which spelled the beginning of the end of the Third Reich and Nazi domination of Europe.  These confident words were given to every person involved in the operation.  However, very few, including Eisenhower himself, had absolute confidence in the mission.  In fact, unknown even to Eisenhower’s inner circle, Ike had already written an announcement the invasion had failed, and that he accepted the blame.

In this lesson, students will investigate the complex aspects of Operation Overlord, including the commanders, geography and history, political, and technological challenges that made this one of the most difficult military operations in history

Thursday and Friday The Pacific War

In this lesson, students will review the historic significance of a controversy involving the Chicago Tribune, which published a series of stories inferring that the US had broken a secret Japanese code, which significantly assisted the US Navy in winning one of the biggest battles of the Pacific Theater of World War II, the Battle of Midway.  Did the Tribune go beyond the First Amendment right of freedom of the press in this instance? 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

1-22-18 to 1-26-18

 

Date: Monday, Tuesday Jan. 22-23

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify and define the basic concepts of democracy.

 

Standards

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

   3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.

   4. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the major ways governmental power is distributed, shared, and structured in unitary, federal, and confederal systems in terms of effectiveness, prevention of abuse of power, and responsiveness to the popular will.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Objectives; Students will-

  1. Identify and explain the five basic concepts of democracy.
  2. Identify real world examples of the five concepts of democracy by brainstorming and completing a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History

2. Bellringer: Students will use a Bellringer worksheet which includes a passage on the Internet and Democracy. Students will read the passage and answer the questions.

3. Students will read Ch. 1 Section 3, pp. 20-24. .

4. Students will complete the graphic organizer on p. 20 and the reading comprehension worksheet handout.

5. Students will share and discuss their answers from the bellringer exercise.
 

 

Assessments-Summative

Students will be assessed through the Understanding of Main Ideas worksheet.

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Wednesday-Friday, 1-24-14 to 1-26-1

 

Description

This lesson is designed to gather required benchmarks and reinforces the previous lesson on the basic concepts of democracy through the use of Jigsaw collaborative learning.

 

Objectives; Students will-

  1. Identify and explain the five basic concepts of democracy.
  2. Identify real world examples of the five concepts of democracy by brainstorming and completing a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

            3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.   

 

Procedures

Quote of the Day and Today in History

  1. Students will be given a short multiple choice test to gather required benchmark data.
  2. The class will be divided into groups and each will be assigned a particular concept of democracy.
  3. Each group will become teaching experts and then will in turn teach the other groups on each concept.

 

Assessment-Formative

Students understanding will be assessed based on a guided discussion on the five concepts of democracy.

World History and Government Lesson Plans 1/16 to 1/19

Class: Periods 2-5                                         Topic:  The Rise of Fascism    

  

 

Tuesday

Political Upheaval in the 1920’s

Instructional Objectives:

Knowledge:

The pupils

  • Students know about the World War 1.
  • Students know about the Triple Alliance.
  • Students know about the Treaty of Versailles

Understanding

The pupils

  • To Understand the Rise of Dictatorship in Italy.
  • To understand the common factors in Italy and Germany, which led to the rise of dictatorship in Italy and Germany?  
  • To understand the cause of the rise of the fascist.                

 Critical Thinking:

The pupils

  • Critically evaluate The rise of Fascism and Nazism and the second world war
  • Critically think about the cause for the rise of Fascism in Italy.

Skill:

The pupils

  • Draw the flow chart on the causes of the rise of fascist dictatorship in Italy.
  • Draw the timeline of the rise of Fascism and its causes.

Teaching Points

 

  1. The rise of dictatorships in Italy.
  2. Mussolini, dictator of Italy brought fascism in Italy.
  3. Fascism and its meaning
  4. Rise of Mussolini.

Map of Political Post war Europe, Picture of prominent leaders, Timeline of rise of Fascism, Diagrammatic Representation.

Tuesday and Wednesday

1924 – THE YEAR THAT MADE HITLER

Objective: To have students analyze, evaluate the rise of Hitler through sourcing and annotating complex text reading. 

Vocabulary: Mein Kampf, Anti-Semitic, High Treason, Nationalistic, Antiparliamentarian, The Blood and The Fist, Swastika, Volkisch

Bellringer-Quotation Interpretation:

“How it happened that Hitler came to power is still the most important question of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century German history, if not all of German history.”

                                                               -Heinrich August Winkler, Historian, 2000

 

How did Hitler come to power?

WARM UP:   Above

 

INTRODUCTION:  Adolf Hitler spent 1924 behind bars, convicted of treason after an unsuccessful coup against the unstable postwar German government.  It was a year of deep reading and intensive writing, or passionate courtroom speeches, of proselytizing to his fellow inmates, and of working feverishly on Mein Kampf.  It was, in many ways, the year that made Hitler an explosively powerful political force.  Everything that would come – the rallies and riots, the single-minded deployment of a catastrophically evil idea – crystallized in this one defining year.

 

ACTIVITY

 

Part 1 – Claim, Evidence and Reasoning –

 

Author’s Claim:  1924 was the year that made Hitler

 

 Students will prove or disprove using text. 

 

Part 2 – Share Out Discussion -

 

Critical Thinking Questions –

 

How was media influential in Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How was the judiciary influential Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How did popular opinion influence Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How did imprisonment act as a haven for Hitler’s “hate ideology’?

 

To what do you attribute the recent rise in anti-Semitic fervor in the United States?

 

 

 

 

Summary &

Assessment:

 

 

 

Text Message:  Similar to a sentence summary, students will write a summary of the key learning in text message format.

 

 

Thursday and Friday

 

Lesson and Question:

HOW CAN WE AVOID THE TRAP OF TYRANNY THAT SURVIVES IN THE REALM OF “ISMS”?

   

Concept Terminology:

Tyranny, Fascism, Nazism, Communism, Marxism, Terrorism, Capitalism, Rule-of-Law, Oligarchy, Paramilitary, Great Terror, Einsatzgruppen, The Great Action, Fahrenheit 451, Orwell 1984, Vaclav Havel, Post-Truth, Solidary Labor Movement, Totalitarianism, Authoritarianism, Intellectual Property, Extremism, Perpetual State of Emergency, Reichstag Fire, Historical Generation

   

 

Warm Up:

 

 

VIDEO – On Tyranny:  Lessons From the 20th Century – Author Interview – Timothy Snyder at the Wilson Center  (11:16 mins)

 

https://youtu.be/A7RBWea31e8

 

According to author, what are the “isms” associated with Tyranny?

 

Quotation Interpretation:  “We don’t recognize history until it knocks on our door” – Timothy Snyder

 

Do you agree/disagree?  Be specific with your response.

 

Lesson Procedure:

 

 

 

WARM UP:   Above

 

INTRODUCTION:  Timothy Snyder gives us a new translation and interpretation to historical experiences, including Nazism, Fascism, Communism and Terrorism as precursors to Tyranny focusing on our need to recognize the structures of disaster as they unfold, as well as society stopping and thinking before we accept a new reality or ideology.  Tyrants are known to crafting alternative realities that people have readily adopted rather than questioned.

 

ACTIVITY

 

Students will analyze, evaluate, annotate and synthesize excerpted secondary source based on Timothy Snyder’s book entitled On Tyranny:  Lessons From the 20th Century using Silent Sustainable Reading Strategy.  Students will formulate a THESIS and support with evidence from the text.  Upon completion they will engage in a Conversation With Yourself  before Turn and Talk to discuss the following

Critical Thinking Questions in a Share Out format:

 

According to the author:

 

  1. How did tyrannical behavior unfold during Nazi Germany and during the Russian Revolution?  Cite evidence from the text.
  2. How can media or collective memory craft alternative realities?
  3. Should people “stop and think” and question new ideologies before blindly accepting them as truth?
  4. If we are to formulate a historical generation, how do we recognize the signs of impending tyranny as vigilant citizens?

 

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Periods-4, Monday-Friday, 1-16-18 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Monday

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify, compare, and contrast differing forms of government in the world today.

 

Standards

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

           

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Preparations

Prepare information using examples of different governments throughout the world for comparisons. MacGruder's American Government by Prentice Hall. Have students read Chapter 1 Section 2,pp. 12-18, followed by a formmative assessment (Forms of government and concepts of democracy).

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History

2. Bellringer: Students will copy a list from the Smart Board; direct democracy, indirect democracy, dictatorship, unitary government, federal government, confederation, presidential government, and parliamentary government. They will then circle each term that describes the U.S. government, then define each circled term.

3. Students will share and discuss their classifications that define The U.S. government.

4. Students will read pp. 12-14 on Participation and participate in Guided Discussion
5. FORMS OF GOVERNMENT-- Guided Discussion-(Where is the Power?)--UNITARY- a centralized government where all powers held by the government belong to a single, central agency. (Most gov'ts are unitary in form) Federal government-one in which the powers of government are divided between a central government and several local governments. CONFEDERATE GOV'T-an alliance of independent states. Most power is held by independent states leaving the central government weak. Explain the relationship between legislative & executive agencies--Presidential: separation of powers between the legislative and executive branches of government. Parliamentary: Executive is made up of the prime minister or premier and that of officials’ cabinet. They themselves are members of the legislative branch, the parliament. Dictatorship exists where those who rule cannot be held responsible to the will of the people.-dictatorship is probably the oldest & most common form of government known..

6. Discuss dictatorships based on the following; Why do dictatorships tend to endure for decades?  Why do dictatorships tend to go hand in hand with military power? What circumstances are likely to create a dictatorship?

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be based on a class discussion on why Dictatorships adopt some form of democratic governments, such as popular election and elected legislative bodies?

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Periods-4, Monday-Friday, 1-1618 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Tuesday and Wednesday

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify, compare, and contrast differing forms of government in the world today.

 

Objectives

  1. Students will compare and contrast democracies and dictatorships by predicting their responses in different situations.
  2. Classify governments according to three sets of characteristics.

3. Define governments based on who can participate

 

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

CS 1.2. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics

 

Preparations

Prepare information using examples of different governments throughout the world for comparisons. MacGruder's American Government by Prentice Hall. Have students read Chapter 1 Section 2,pp. 12-18, followed by a formative assessment (Forms of government and concepts of democracy).

 

 

Procedures

Students will be given a reading comprehension worksheet to complete. The students will read Ch. 1 Section 2, pp. 12-18. Students will complete the worksheet and then as a separate assignment answer the Section 2 Assessment questions #2, #3, and #5.

 

Assessment-Summative

Students understanding will be assessed based on the Reading Comprehension Worksheet and the Section assessment questions on p. 18.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 1-18-18 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Thursday and Friday

 

Description

This lesson will identify and explain the five concepts of democracy by using a graphic organizer and teach students to identify real-world examples of the five concepts.

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

CS 1.2. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics.        

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Identify and explain the five concepts of democracy by completing a graphic organizer.
  2. Identify real world examples by brainstorming and filling out a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Preparation

Assign Chapter 1 Section 3, pp. 20-24 and the graphic organizer in the text.

 

 

Procedure

Today in History and Quote of the Day

  1. Following the reading and completion of the students’ graphic organizers have volunteers provide definitions and express what each concept means to them.
  2. Ask the students what the term Free Enterprise means to them.
  3. Extend the discussion by asking the students the following questions; Why might going to school be a duty instead of a responsibility? Should volunteering be a duty rather than a responsibility? What would be the benefits of making voting a duty? What might happen if serving on a jury was a responsibility rather than a duty?

 

Assessment-Summative and Formative

Students graphic organizers 

Sectionalism and Civil War

World History Lesson Plans

Monday-Thursday 11/13 to 11/17

 

Lesson Plans 10/23 to 10/27

World History

Monday-Wednesday

Inventors of the Industrial Revolution

Interactive Powerepoint presentation

Have students complete the Inventor Chart and also require that they write questions they would like to know more about---one for each invention category. Do NOT have them take the quiz right away. Reconvene the class to share these questions for discussion and clarification purposes. Then have students return to the laptops for the quiz.

As a class discussion and lesson, have each student hypothesize what would have happened without a certain inventor by “subtracting” from the classroom, describing of things we use today traced back to the Industrial Revolution. For example, Betty says, “I subtract everything woven. We would all be wearing handwoven or hand-knit clothing if it weren’t for the Power Loom. If the class is split into two teams, they can earn points and compete by coming up with valid ideas.

  • Since the activities will take more than one class day- possibly as many as 3 or 4- have students recall something about each invention group from the day before to “earn” the right to be Vanna… or let the class play “stump Vanna” with invention questions from the previous days to remove the board operator and replace him/her. It is sometimes very helpful to have your most active and disruptive student operate the board because it keeps him/her on task and focused.
  •  
World History Lesson Plans 8/28 to 9/1

  Monday and Tuesday

 

Islamic Contributions to the World

 

 

Drinking industry and Distilled liquids

It was Muslim chemists who first invented pure distillation processes, which could fully purify chemical substances.
Purified distilled alcohol by Jabir ibn Hayyan in the 8th century

 

Hygiene industries

True soap made of vegetable oils (such as olive oil) or with

aromatics (such as thyme oil)were invented by al-Razi Rhazes.  Perfumed and colored soaps and liquid and solid soaps were also invented by Muslim chemists as well.

 

Islamic Astronomy: Astronomical instruments

Muslim astronomers developed a number of astronomical instruments, These instruments were used by Muslims for a variety of purposes related to astronomy, astrology, horoscopes, navigation, surveying, and timekeeping.

 

Analog Machines (or Computers)

The Plate of Conjunctions, a computing instrument used to determine the time of day invented by al-Kashi in the 15th century. A mechanical planetary computer called the Plate of Zones could predict the true positions in longitude of the Sun and Moon, and the planets in terms of elliptical orbits.

 

Parachute

In 9th century Islamic Spain, Abbas Ibn Firnas (Armen Firnas) invented a primitive version of the parachute and the hand glider.

 

Camera

Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen), the "father of optics" and pioneer of the modern scientific method, invented the camera obscura and pinhole camera.He was the first person to realize that rays of light enters the eye, rather than leaving it, The word "camera" comes from the Arabic word qamara for a dark or private room. Ibn al-Haytham first described pinhole camera after noticing the way light came through a hole in window shutters.

 

Chemical technology

Jabir ibn Hayyan (Geber), the father of chemistry, invented the alembic still and many chemicals, including distilled alcohol, and established the perfume industry.

 

Street lighting and litter collection facilities

The first street lamps were built in the Arab Empire, especially in Cordoba, which also had the first facilities and waste containers for litter collection.

 

Clock technology



Astronomical clocks
Muslim astronomers and engineers constructed a variety of highly accurate astronomical clocks for use in their observatories.

 

Mechanical clocks

The first mechanical clocks driven by weights, and gears and were invented by Muslim engineers. The first geared mechanical clocks were invented by the 11th century Arab engineer Ibn Khalaf al-Muradi from Islamic Spain.

 

Paper mill

Paper was introduced to the Muslim world by Chinese prisoners after the Battle of Talas. Muslims made several improvements to papermaking and built the first paper mills in Baghdad, Iraq, as early as 794.

 

Sugar refinery

The first sugar refineries were built by Muslim engineers. They were first driven by water mills, and then windmills from the 9th and 10th centuries in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iran.

 

Fountain pen

The earliest historical record of a reservoir fountain pen dates back to the 10th century. In 953, Ma'ad al-Mu'izz, the caliph of Egypt, demanded a pen, which would not stain his hands or clothes, and was provided with a pen, which held ink in a reservoir.

 

On/off switch

The on and off switch was invented by Muslim engineers between the 9th and 12th centuries. It was employed in a variety of automatic and water clocks. The mechanism later had an influence on the development of the electric on/off switch, which appeared in the 1950s

 

Medical Technology

Muslim physicians pioneered a number of medical treatments, including: Tracheotomy by Ibn Zuhr in the 12th century. Muslim anesthesiologist invented inoculations, modern oral and inhalant anesthesia as well as the first smallpox vaccine in the form of cowpox. At least 2,000 medicinal substances were invented by Muslim technology.

 

Medical university and public hospital

The Islamic hospital-universities were the first free public hospitals, the first medical schools, and the first universities to issue diplomas. The first of these institutions was opened in Baghdad. They then appeared in Egypt from 872 and then in Islamic Spain, Persia and the Maghreb thereafter. Physicians and surgeons at Islamic hospital-universities gave lectures to medical students and a diploma would be issued to any student who completed his/her education and was qualified to be a doctor of Medicine.

 

Military technology

After the spread of early gunpowder from China to the Muslim world, Muslim chemists and engineers developed compositions for explosive gunpowder and their own weapons for use in gunpowder warfare.

 

Hand cannon, handgun, portable firearms

The first portable hand cannons (midfa) loaded with explosive gunpowder, the first example of a handgun and portable firearms were used by the Egyptians to repel the Mongols at the Battle of Ain Jalut in 1260, and again in 1304. 

 

Wednesday and Thursday

THE ENLIGHTENMENT  

Until the late 1700’s, people of France accepted the fact that their king ruled by divine right, that Church teachings were correct, and that well-to-do nobles had privileges not enjoyed by the poor. But by the end of the century, Frenchmen no longer accepted these beliefs. This change in attitude came about as the result of writings by a group know as the ‘philisophes’. The philisophes were intelligent, reasonable men who felt there was much about life in Europe that was unfair and unjust. Since most philosophes were from France and since France was ruled by an absolute monarchy surrounded by a privileged nobility, the French way of life came under particular attack. The chart which follows lists four leading thinkers of the 1700’s. They published writings during a perid called the Age of Reason, or Enlightenment. Many ideas from the Enlightenment were eventually adopted by countries in Europe and around the world. Ideas even spread to the United States and are today a part of our way of life. Read each statement by the philisophes given on the chart and decide whether the statement is a true description of present American life. If it is true of the United States today, fill in the space with yes. If the ideas or attitude is not true of present life in the U.S., put no in the space. 

The philisophes were intelligent, reasonable men who felt there was much about life in Europe that was unfair and unjust. Since most philosophes were from France and since France was ruled by an absolute monarchy surrounded by a privileged nobility, the French way of life came under particular attack. The chart which follows lists four leading thinkers of the 1700’s. They published writings during a perid called the Age of Reason, or Enlightenment. Many ideas from the Enlightenment were eventually adopted by countries in Europe and around the world. Ideas even spread to the United States and are today a part of our way of life. Read each statement by the philisophes given on the chart and decide whether the statement is a true description of present American life. If it is true of the United States today, fill in the space with yes. If the ideas or attitude is not true of present life in the U.S., put no in the space. 

John Locke 1. All men are free and equal at birth. 2. Everyone has the right to life liberty, & property. 3. Citizens have the right to overthrow the government when their natural rights are violated. 4. Rulers receive the right to govern from the people and unfair rulers can be forced from power. 5. Man is not born to be a good or evil person – he is made one way or other by his life experiences and society around him. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ Baron de Montesquieu 1. An absolute ruler in an  Baron de Montesquieu 1. An absolute ruler in an undesirable leader because one-man rule limits basic freedoms such as speech, press, and religion. 2. There should be a ‘separation of powers’ in government between legislative, executive and judicial. 3. Slavery, torture, religious persecution, and censorship are all wrong. 4. A man is innocent until proven guilty. 5. When one country increases its military power, so do other countries; therefore all nations should limit their military strength in order to reduce the chances of war. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______   

Voltaire 1. A man should not be persecuted because of his religious beliefs. 2. Religious myths and ceremonies do nothing to make men better and should therefore be ignored. 3. Clergymen are more interested in increasing the power of the Church that they are in making man better. 4. A scientist is a greater person then a conquering general. 5. All men should be treated as equals and should have freedom of the speech and of the press. 6. Democracy is not a good form of government because the common people are not capable of governing themselves; the best government is one headed by a good and fair king. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ 6. _______ 

Rousseau 1. It is unfair that some people are rich while other people are poor. 2. The rich should not enjoy special privileges. 3. Compared to man during the Stone Age, modern man is unhappy, insecure, and greedy. 4. Social and political reforms must be made before man can be a good person. 5. Democracy is a good form of government. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ 

QUESTIONS: 1. In the philosophes were alive today, do you think they would be generally satisfied or dissatisfied with social conditions and the type of government we have today. EXPLAIN! _______________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ 2. Which three statements by the philosophes do you believe are of the greatest importance to mankind? a. ___________________________________________________________________ b. ___________________________________________________________________ c. ___________________________________________________________________

 

  3. Choose one of the statements and tell why you disagree with it. a. Statement: __________________________________________________________ b. Reason for disagreement ________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 4. Not all the philosophes held the same beliefs, but most agreed that: a. Reason should be used at all times b. The search for new knowledge and ideas should continue c. Improvements must be made in the system of justice to end unfair jail sentences, the torture of prisoners, and terrible conditions in prisons. d. Slavery and warfare should be done away with e. Freedom of religion, speech and press must be given to all f. Everyone should enjoy liberty and equality. g. There should be public education for all, not just schools for children of the wealthy.  

Bill Nobles Lesson Plans World History

World History and Government Lesson Plans 2/20 to 2/23

World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 2/20 to Friday 2/23

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page. 

 

 

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 20

 

Description

This lesson will analyze how the two party system has affected American history.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Understand the origins of political parties in the United States.
  2. Identify and describe the three periods of single party domination and describe the current era of divided government.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the Venn graphic organizer in the text, p. 94-102.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

 

2. Bellringer: Students will view the two party symbols in a Thomas Nast Political cartoon and write down the qualities associated with these animals. Discussion will be based on these and what students believe Nast’s purpose was using these two principals.

3. Introduce topic: Analyzing political parties through political cartoons.

4. Students will read Ch. 5 Section 2 and complete the political cartoon worksheet.

5. Students will discuss the last question on the worksheet on the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 might affect party balance and how events such as new technology, major historical events and cultural change can affect attitudes about political parties.

 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the political party worksheet.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 21

 

Description

This lesson is designed to suffrage rights, voting requirements, and the historical relationship between voting and Civil Rights.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

            7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under

the law.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Examine the reasons for expansion of voting rights.

2. Analyze how voting qualification have changed over time.

3. Identify historical barriers and voter discrimination trends that have affected African-Americans historically.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Organize the class into three groups and assign each group a section from the chapter.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students groups will create a presentation detailing the main points of the section.

3. As the groups give their presentations they will create a study guide on the Smart Board outlining each section’s main points.

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on class presentations

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Noble

Thursday, Feb. 23

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 23

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 16

 

Description

This lesson the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will complete required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the exam

World History and Government Lesson Plans 2/06 to 2/09

ThLesson Plans 4/12-4/15

World History The Cold War
Origins

After working together to defeat the Axis Powers in Europe and in the Pacific, relations between the Soviet Union and its western Allies quickly soured. The first cracks in the relationship appeared before the war ended at the Potsdam Conference, where Allied leaders found common ground on the future of Germany but clashed over Soviet demands for friendly "buffer" states between it and its enemy in two devastating world wars. This hairline fracture soon became a gaping chasm as East and West sought to shore up allies, first in Europe and then in Asia, Africa and Latin America. It was, in fact, in the Third World, which was emerging from centuries of European domination, that the Cold War became "hot." Unwilling to risk the nuclear Armageddon that a direct conflict would surely bring, the superpowers instead focused their military efforts on establishing friendly states around the globe. So while the poles of the Cold War were centered in the US and Soviet Union, the magnetic field of the conflict encompassed the entire world. It is this global nature of the conflict that provides the context for the unit's essential question: How did Cold War tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union impact the economic, social and political development of former European colonies in the Third World?

 

 

 

Tuesday and Wednesday

Objectives: 1) Compare and contrast the causes and courses of World Wars I and II; 2) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II; 3) Explain the United States' policy of containment

Class Work: Document-Based Question; paragraph writing; guided reading

 

Thursday

Objectives: 1) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II;

Class Work: Guided note-taking on movie, Atomic Cafe

 

Friday

Objectives: 1) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II; 2) Analyze the role of nuclear weapons in keeping the conflict between the US and USSR "cold"

Class Work: Guided note-taking on movie; Analyze political cartoon

 

Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 6

 

Description

This lesson is designed to examine the formal amendment process for the U.S. Constitution

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 2: The student will describe the historic and philosophical foundations of the United States republican system of government.

            6. Analyze the steps of the constitutional amendment process including examples of recent attempts to amend the United States Constitution as exemplified in the issues of the Equal Rights Amendment and flag desecration.  

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Compare the process of ratification of amendments by studying charts.
  2. Identify the four different ways by which the Constitution may be changed.
  3. Understand that while many amendments have been proposed, only a select group has been ratified.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the graphic organizer in the text, p. 79-83.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Introduction of the topic: the students will be informed that today the class will discuss the formal amendment process. The discussion will center around the following discussion questions; A. What has been the most often used method for ratification and why?  B. How many of the amendments were ratified this way? C. What method was used to ratify the 21st Amendment and why?  D. Describe the other two methods for ratification.  
3. Students will read the section.

4.  Class discussion.

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the class discussion.

 

 

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 7

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how basic legislation has added to our understanding of the Constitution over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the executive and legislative branches have interpreted the Constitution.

3. Analyze the role of party practices and custom in interpreting the Constitution.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will read the section, p. 85-88, then complete the cause and effect chart on p. 85.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will identify and discuss the five methods in which change occurs.

4. Students will hand in their cause and effects charts as an assessment. 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their completion of the graphic organizer on p. 85. This is a two column cause and effect chart that must include separate items for each column.

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Thursday, Feb. 08

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how basic legislation has added to our understanding of the Constitution over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the executive and legislative branches have interpreted the Constitution.

3. Analyze the role of party practices and custom in interpreting the Constitution.

 

 

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will re-read the section, p. 85-88, then finish the cause and effect chart on p. 85.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will identify and discuss the five methods in which change occurs.

4. Students will hand in their cause and effects charts as an assessment. 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their completion of the graphic organizer on p. 85. This is a two column cause and effect chart that must include separate items for each column.

 

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 09

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how federal and state governments interact and share powers over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the Federal and State governments use expressed and implied powers.

 

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will read the section, p. 90-95, then engage in discussion.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will discuss the use of implied and expressed powers at the State and Federal levels.

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their response to discussion questions.

World History and Government Lesson Plans 1/22 to 1/26

World History

World War II

Monday-The Home Front

During World War II African Americans found themselves with conflicting feelings about supporting the war effort when their own country did not offer them the freedom America was fighting for overseas.   The Double Victory - Double V - campaign, begun by the Pittsburgh Courier newspaper in 1942, helped to address this issue.  It encouraged African Americans to participate at every level in winning the war abroad, while simultaneously fighting for their civil rights at home.

Tuesday-Nazism and Fascism

Between 1933 and 1945, Nazi Germany and its collaborators pursued a program to systematically persecute and destroy six million Jews. Nazi ideology identified other enemies; they were targeted for racial, ethnic or political reasons.

During this lesson, high school students will understand the German National Socialism (Nazi) extermination campaign against European Jewry and other targeted groups within the context of World War II history; appraise responses to the Holocaust by governments and individuals; reflect on racism and stereotyping; and reflect on responsibility and remembrance

Wednesday-D Day

General Dwight D. Eisenhower wrote his “order of the day” on D-Day, the Allied invasion of France, which spelled the beginning of the end of the Third Reich and Nazi domination of Europe.  These confident words were given to every person involved in the operation.  However, very few, including Eisenhower himself, had absolute confidence in the mission.  In fact, unknown even to Eisenhower’s inner circle, Ike had already written an announcement the invasion had failed, and that he accepted the blame.

In this lesson, students will investigate the complex aspects of Operation Overlord, including the commanders, geography and history, political, and technological challenges that made this one of the most difficult military operations in history

Thursday and Friday The Pacific War

In this lesson, students will review the historic significance of a controversy involving the Chicago Tribune, which published a series of stories inferring that the US had broken a secret Japanese code, which significantly assisted the US Navy in winning one of the biggest battles of the Pacific Theater of World War II, the Battle of Midway.  Did the Tribune go beyond the First Amendment right of freedom of the press in this instance? 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

1-22-18 to 1-26-18

 

Date: Monday, Tuesday Jan. 22-23

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify and define the basic concepts of democracy.

 

Standards

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

   3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.

   4. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the major ways governmental power is distributed, shared, and structured in unitary, federal, and confederal systems in terms of effectiveness, prevention of abuse of power, and responsiveness to the popular will.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Objectives; Students will-

  1. Identify and explain the five basic concepts of democracy.
  2. Identify real world examples of the five concepts of democracy by brainstorming and completing a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History

2. Bellringer: Students will use a Bellringer worksheet which includes a passage on the Internet and Democracy. Students will read the passage and answer the questions.

3. Students will read Ch. 1 Section 3, pp. 20-24. .

4. Students will complete the graphic organizer on p. 20 and the reading comprehension worksheet handout.

5. Students will share and discuss their answers from the bellringer exercise.
 

 

Assessments-Summative

Students will be assessed through the Understanding of Main Ideas worksheet.

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Wednesday-Friday, 1-24-14 to 1-26-1

 

Description

This lesson is designed to gather required benchmarks and reinforces the previous lesson on the basic concepts of democracy through the use of Jigsaw collaborative learning.

 

Objectives; Students will-

  1. Identify and explain the five basic concepts of democracy.
  2. Identify real world examples of the five concepts of democracy by brainstorming and completing a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

            3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.   

 

Procedures

Quote of the Day and Today in History

  1. Students will be given a short multiple choice test to gather required benchmark data.
  2. The class will be divided into groups and each will be assigned a particular concept of democracy.
  3. Each group will become teaching experts and then will in turn teach the other groups on each concept.

 

Assessment-Formative

Students understanding will be assessed based on a guided discussion on the five concepts of democracy.

World History and Government Lesson Plans 1/16 to 1/19

Class: Periods 2-5                                         Topic:  The Rise of Fascism    

  

 

Tuesday

Political Upheaval in the 1920’s

Instructional Objectives:

Knowledge:

The pupils

  • Students know about the World War 1.
  • Students know about the Triple Alliance.
  • Students know about the Treaty of Versailles

Understanding

The pupils

  • To Understand the Rise of Dictatorship in Italy.
  • To understand the common factors in Italy and Germany, which led to the rise of dictatorship in Italy and Germany?  
  • To understand the cause of the rise of the fascist.                

 Critical Thinking:

The pupils

  • Critically evaluate The rise of Fascism and Nazism and the second world war
  • Critically think about the cause for the rise of Fascism in Italy.

Skill:

The pupils

  • Draw the flow chart on the causes of the rise of fascist dictatorship in Italy.
  • Draw the timeline of the rise of Fascism and its causes.

Teaching Points

 

  1. The rise of dictatorships in Italy.
  2. Mussolini, dictator of Italy brought fascism in Italy.
  3. Fascism and its meaning
  4. Rise of Mussolini.

Map of Political Post war Europe, Picture of prominent leaders, Timeline of rise of Fascism, Diagrammatic Representation.

Tuesday and Wednesday

1924 – THE YEAR THAT MADE HITLER

Objective: To have students analyze, evaluate the rise of Hitler through sourcing and annotating complex text reading. 

Vocabulary: Mein Kampf, Anti-Semitic, High Treason, Nationalistic, Antiparliamentarian, The Blood and The Fist, Swastika, Volkisch

Bellringer-Quotation Interpretation:

“How it happened that Hitler came to power is still the most important question of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century German history, if not all of German history.”

                                                               -Heinrich August Winkler, Historian, 2000

 

How did Hitler come to power?

WARM UP:   Above

 

INTRODUCTION:  Adolf Hitler spent 1924 behind bars, convicted of treason after an unsuccessful coup against the unstable postwar German government.  It was a year of deep reading and intensive writing, or passionate courtroom speeches, of proselytizing to his fellow inmates, and of working feverishly on Mein Kampf.  It was, in many ways, the year that made Hitler an explosively powerful political force.  Everything that would come – the rallies and riots, the single-minded deployment of a catastrophically evil idea – crystallized in this one defining year.

 

ACTIVITY

 

Part 1 – Claim, Evidence and Reasoning –

 

Author’s Claim:  1924 was the year that made Hitler

 

 Students will prove or disprove using text. 

 

Part 2 – Share Out Discussion -

 

Critical Thinking Questions –

 

How was media influential in Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How was the judiciary influential Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How did popular opinion influence Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How did imprisonment act as a haven for Hitler’s “hate ideology’?

 

To what do you attribute the recent rise in anti-Semitic fervor in the United States?

 

 

 

 

Summary &

Assessment:

 

 

 

Text Message:  Similar to a sentence summary, students will write a summary of the key learning in text message format.

 

 

Thursday and Friday

 

Lesson and Question:

HOW CAN WE AVOID THE TRAP OF TYRANNY THAT SURVIVES IN THE REALM OF “ISMS”?

   

Concept Terminology:

Tyranny, Fascism, Nazism, Communism, Marxism, Terrorism, Capitalism, Rule-of-Law, Oligarchy, Paramilitary, Great Terror, Einsatzgruppen, The Great Action, Fahrenheit 451, Orwell 1984, Vaclav Havel, Post-Truth, Solidary Labor Movement, Totalitarianism, Authoritarianism, Intellectual Property, Extremism, Perpetual State of Emergency, Reichstag Fire, Historical Generation

   

 

Warm Up:

 

 

VIDEO – On Tyranny:  Lessons From the 20th Century – Author Interview – Timothy Snyder at the Wilson Center  (11:16 mins)

 

https://youtu.be/A7RBWea31e8

 

According to author, what are the “isms” associated with Tyranny?

 

Quotation Interpretation:  “We don’t recognize history until it knocks on our door” – Timothy Snyder

 

Do you agree/disagree?  Be specific with your response.

 

Lesson Procedure:

 

 

 

WARM UP:   Above

 

INTRODUCTION:  Timothy Snyder gives us a new translation and interpretation to historical experiences, including Nazism, Fascism, Communism and Terrorism as precursors to Tyranny focusing on our need to recognize the structures of disaster as they unfold, as well as society stopping and thinking before we accept a new reality or ideology.  Tyrants are known to crafting alternative realities that people have readily adopted rather than questioned.

 

ACTIVITY

 

Students will analyze, evaluate, annotate and synthesize excerpted secondary source based on Timothy Snyder’s book entitled On Tyranny:  Lessons From the 20th Century using Silent Sustainable Reading Strategy.  Students will formulate a THESIS and support with evidence from the text.  Upon completion they will engage in a Conversation With Yourself  before Turn and Talk to discuss the following

Critical Thinking Questions in a Share Out format:

 

According to the author:

 

  1. How did tyrannical behavior unfold during Nazi Germany and during the Russian Revolution?  Cite evidence from the text.
  2. How can media or collective memory craft alternative realities?
  3. Should people “stop and think” and question new ideologies before blindly accepting them as truth?
  4. If we are to formulate a historical generation, how do we recognize the signs of impending tyranny as vigilant citizens?

 

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Periods-4, Monday-Friday, 1-16-18 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Monday

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify, compare, and contrast differing forms of government in the world today.

 

Standards

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

           

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Preparations

Prepare information using examples of different governments throughout the world for comparisons. MacGruder's American Government by Prentice Hall. Have students read Chapter 1 Section 2,pp. 12-18, followed by a formmative assessment (Forms of government and concepts of democracy).

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History

2. Bellringer: Students will copy a list from the Smart Board; direct democracy, indirect democracy, dictatorship, unitary government, federal government, confederation, presidential government, and parliamentary government. They will then circle each term that describes the U.S. government, then define each circled term.

3. Students will share and discuss their classifications that define The U.S. government.

4. Students will read pp. 12-14 on Participation and participate in Guided Discussion
5. FORMS OF GOVERNMENT-- Guided Discussion-(Where is the Power?)--UNITARY- a centralized government where all powers held by the government belong to a single, central agency. (Most gov'ts are unitary in form) Federal government-one in which the powers of government are divided between a central government and several local governments. CONFEDERATE GOV'T-an alliance of independent states. Most power is held by independent states leaving the central government weak. Explain the relationship between legislative & executive agencies--Presidential: separation of powers between the legislative and executive branches of government. Parliamentary: Executive is made up of the prime minister or premier and that of officials’ cabinet. They themselves are members of the legislative branch, the parliament. Dictatorship exists where those who rule cannot be held responsible to the will of the people.-dictatorship is probably the oldest & most common form of government known..

6. Discuss dictatorships based on the following; Why do dictatorships tend to endure for decades?  Why do dictatorships tend to go hand in hand with military power? What circumstances are likely to create a dictatorship?

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be based on a class discussion on why Dictatorships adopt some form of democratic governments, such as popular election and elected legislative bodies?

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Periods-4, Monday-Friday, 1-1618 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Tuesday and Wednesday

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify, compare, and contrast differing forms of government in the world today.

 

Objectives

  1. Students will compare and contrast democracies and dictatorships by predicting their responses in different situations.
  2. Classify governments according to three sets of characteristics.

3. Define governments based on who can participate

 

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

CS 1.2. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics

 

Preparations

Prepare information using examples of different governments throughout the world for comparisons. MacGruder's American Government by Prentice Hall. Have students read Chapter 1 Section 2,pp. 12-18, followed by a formative assessment (Forms of government and concepts of democracy).

 

 

Procedures

Students will be given a reading comprehension worksheet to complete. The students will read Ch. 1 Section 2, pp. 12-18. Students will complete the worksheet and then as a separate assignment answer the Section 2 Assessment questions #2, #3, and #5.

 

Assessment-Summative

Students understanding will be assessed based on the Reading Comprehension Worksheet and the Section assessment questions on p. 18.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 1-18-18 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Thursday and Friday

 

Description

This lesson will identify and explain the five concepts of democracy by using a graphic organizer and teach students to identify real-world examples of the five concepts.

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

CS 1.2. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics.        

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Identify and explain the five concepts of democracy by completing a graphic organizer.
  2. Identify real world examples by brainstorming and filling out a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Preparation

Assign Chapter 1 Section 3, pp. 20-24 and the graphic organizer in the text.

 

 

Procedure

Today in History and Quote of the Day

  1. Following the reading and completion of the students’ graphic organizers have volunteers provide definitions and express what each concept means to them.
  2. Ask the students what the term Free Enterprise means to them.
  3. Extend the discussion by asking the students the following questions; Why might going to school be a duty instead of a responsibility? Should volunteering be a duty rather than a responsibility? What would be the benefits of making voting a duty? What might happen if serving on a jury was a responsibility rather than a duty?

 

Assessment-Summative and Formative

Students graphic organizers 

Sectionalism and Civil War

World History Lesson Plans

Monday-Thursday 11/13 to 11/17

 

Lesson Plans 10/23 to 10/27

World History

Monday-Wednesday

Inventors of the Industrial Revolution

Interactive Powerepoint presentation

Have students complete the Inventor Chart and also require that they write questions they would like to know more about---one for each invention category. Do NOT have them take the quiz right away. Reconvene the class to share these questions for discussion and clarification purposes. Then have students return to the laptops for the quiz.

As a class discussion and lesson, have each student hypothesize what would have happened without a certain inventor by “subtracting” from the classroom, describing of things we use today traced back to the Industrial Revolution. For example, Betty says, “I subtract everything woven. We would all be wearing handwoven or hand-knit clothing if it weren’t for the Power Loom. If the class is split into two teams, they can earn points and compete by coming up with valid ideas.

  • Since the activities will take more than one class day- possibly as many as 3 or 4- have students recall something about each invention group from the day before to “earn” the right to be Vanna… or let the class play “stump Vanna” with invention questions from the previous days to remove the board operator and replace him/her. It is sometimes very helpful to have your most active and disruptive student operate the board because it keeps him/her on task and focused.
  •  
World History Lesson Plans 8/28 to 9/1

  Monday and Tuesday

 

Islamic Contributions to the World

 

 

Drinking industry and Distilled liquids

It was Muslim chemists who first invented pure distillation processes, which could fully purify chemical substances.
Purified distilled alcohol by Jabir ibn Hayyan in the 8th century

 

Hygiene industries

True soap made of vegetable oils (such as olive oil) or with

aromatics (such as thyme oil)were invented by al-Razi Rhazes.  Perfumed and colored soaps and liquid and solid soaps were also invented by Muslim chemists as well.

 

Islamic Astronomy: Astronomical instruments

Muslim astronomers developed a number of astronomical instruments, These instruments were used by Muslims for a variety of purposes related to astronomy, astrology, horoscopes, navigation, surveying, and timekeeping.

 

Analog Machines (or Computers)

The Plate of Conjunctions, a computing instrument used to determine the time of day invented by al-Kashi in the 15th century. A mechanical planetary computer called the Plate of Zones could predict the true positions in longitude of the Sun and Moon, and the planets in terms of elliptical orbits.

 

Parachute

In 9th century Islamic Spain, Abbas Ibn Firnas (Armen Firnas) invented a primitive version of the parachute and the hand glider.

 

Camera

Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen), the "father of optics" and pioneer of the modern scientific method, invented the camera obscura and pinhole camera.He was the first person to realize that rays of light enters the eye, rather than leaving it, The word "camera" comes from the Arabic word qamara for a dark or private room. Ibn al-Haytham first described pinhole camera after noticing the way light came through a hole in window shutters.

 

Chemical technology

Jabir ibn Hayyan (Geber), the father of chemistry, invented the alembic still and many chemicals, including distilled alcohol, and established the perfume industry.

 

Street lighting and litter collection facilities

The first street lamps were built in the Arab Empire, especially in Cordoba, which also had the first facilities and waste containers for litter collection.

 

Clock technology



Astronomical clocks
Muslim astronomers and engineers constructed a variety of highly accurate astronomical clocks for use in their observatories.

 

Mechanical clocks

The first mechanical clocks driven by weights, and gears and were invented by Muslim engineers. The first geared mechanical clocks were invented by the 11th century Arab engineer Ibn Khalaf al-Muradi from Islamic Spain.

 

Paper mill

Paper was introduced to the Muslim world by Chinese prisoners after the Battle of Talas. Muslims made several improvements to papermaking and built the first paper mills in Baghdad, Iraq, as early as 794.

 

Sugar refinery

The first sugar refineries were built by Muslim engineers. They were first driven by water mills, and then windmills from the 9th and 10th centuries in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iran.

 

Fountain pen

The earliest historical record of a reservoir fountain pen dates back to the 10th century. In 953, Ma'ad al-Mu'izz, the caliph of Egypt, demanded a pen, which would not stain his hands or clothes, and was provided with a pen, which held ink in a reservoir.

 

On/off switch

The on and off switch was invented by Muslim engineers between the 9th and 12th centuries. It was employed in a variety of automatic and water clocks. The mechanism later had an influence on the development of the electric on/off switch, which appeared in the 1950s

 

Medical Technology

Muslim physicians pioneered a number of medical treatments, including: Tracheotomy by Ibn Zuhr in the 12th century. Muslim anesthesiologist invented inoculations, modern oral and inhalant anesthesia as well as the first smallpox vaccine in the form of cowpox. At least 2,000 medicinal substances were invented by Muslim technology.

 

Medical university and public hospital

The Islamic hospital-universities were the first free public hospitals, the first medical schools, and the first universities to issue diplomas. The first of these institutions was opened in Baghdad. They then appeared in Egypt from 872 and then in Islamic Spain, Persia and the Maghreb thereafter. Physicians and surgeons at Islamic hospital-universities gave lectures to medical students and a diploma would be issued to any student who completed his/her education and was qualified to be a doctor of Medicine.

 

Military technology

After the spread of early gunpowder from China to the Muslim world, Muslim chemists and engineers developed compositions for explosive gunpowder and their own weapons for use in gunpowder warfare.

 

Hand cannon, handgun, portable firearms

The first portable hand cannons (midfa) loaded with explosive gunpowder, the first example of a handgun and portable firearms were used by the Egyptians to repel the Mongols at the Battle of Ain Jalut in 1260, and again in 1304. 

 

Wednesday and Thursday

THE ENLIGHTENMENT  

Until the late 1700’s, people of France accepted the fact that their king ruled by divine right, that Church teachings were correct, and that well-to-do nobles had privileges not enjoyed by the poor. But by the end of the century, Frenchmen no longer accepted these beliefs. This change in attitude came about as the result of writings by a group know as the ‘philisophes’. The philisophes were intelligent, reasonable men who felt there was much about life in Europe that was unfair and unjust. Since most philosophes were from France and since France was ruled by an absolute monarchy surrounded by a privileged nobility, the French way of life came under particular attack. The chart which follows lists four leading thinkers of the 1700’s. They published writings during a perid called the Age of Reason, or Enlightenment. Many ideas from the Enlightenment were eventually adopted by countries in Europe and around the world. Ideas even spread to the United States and are today a part of our way of life. Read each statement by the philisophes given on the chart and decide whether the statement is a true description of present American life. If it is true of the United States today, fill in the space with yes. If the ideas or attitude is not true of present life in the U.S., put no in the space. 

The philisophes were intelligent, reasonable men who felt there was much about life in Europe that was unfair and unjust. Since most philosophes were from France and since France was ruled by an absolute monarchy surrounded by a privileged nobility, the French way of life came under particular attack. The chart which follows lists four leading thinkers of the 1700’s. They published writings during a perid called the Age of Reason, or Enlightenment. Many ideas from the Enlightenment were eventually adopted by countries in Europe and around the world. Ideas even spread to the United States and are today a part of our way of life. Read each statement by the philisophes given on the chart and decide whether the statement is a true description of present American life. If it is true of the United States today, fill in the space with yes. If the ideas or attitude is not true of present life in the U.S., put no in the space. 

John Locke 1. All men are free and equal at birth. 2. Everyone has the right to life liberty, & property. 3. Citizens have the right to overthrow the government when their natural rights are violated. 4. Rulers receive the right to govern from the people and unfair rulers can be forced from power. 5. Man is not born to be a good or evil person – he is made one way or other by his life experiences and society around him. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ Baron de Montesquieu 1. An absolute ruler in an  Baron de Montesquieu 1. An absolute ruler in an undesirable leader because one-man rule limits basic freedoms such as speech, press, and religion. 2. There should be a ‘separation of powers’ in government between legislative, executive and judicial. 3. Slavery, torture, religious persecution, and censorship are all wrong. 4. A man is innocent until proven guilty. 5. When one country increases its military power, so do other countries; therefore all nations should limit their military strength in order to reduce the chances of war. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______   

Voltaire 1. A man should not be persecuted because of his religious beliefs. 2. Religious myths and ceremonies do nothing to make men better and should therefore be ignored. 3. Clergymen are more interested in increasing the power of the Church that they are in making man better. 4. A scientist is a greater person then a conquering general. 5. All men should be treated as equals and should have freedom of the speech and of the press. 6. Democracy is not a good form of government because the common people are not capable of governing themselves; the best government is one headed by a good and fair king. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ 6. _______ 

Rousseau 1. It is unfair that some people are rich while other people are poor. 2. The rich should not enjoy special privileges. 3. Compared to man during the Stone Age, modern man is unhappy, insecure, and greedy. 4. Social and political reforms must be made before man can be a good person. 5. Democracy is a good form of government. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ 

QUESTIONS: 1. In the philosophes were alive today, do you think they would be generally satisfied or dissatisfied with social conditions and the type of government we have today. EXPLAIN! _______________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ 2. Which three statements by the philosophes do you believe are of the greatest importance to mankind? a. ___________________________________________________________________ b. ___________________________________________________________________ c. ___________________________________________________________________

 

  3. Choose one of the statements and tell why you disagree with it. a. Statement: __________________________________________________________ b. Reason for disagreement ________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 4. Not all the philosophes held the same beliefs, but most agreed that: a. Reason should be used at all times b. The search for new knowledge and ideas should continue c. Improvements must be made in the system of justice to end unfair jail sentences, the torture of prisoners, and terrible conditions in prisons. d. Slavery and warfare should be done away with e. Freedom of religion, speech and press must be given to all f. Everyone should enjoy liberty and equality. g. There should be public education for all, not just schools for children of the wealthy.  

Bill Nobles Lesson Plans World History

World History and Government Lesson Plans 2/20 to 2/23

World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 2/20 to Friday 2/23

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page. 

 

 

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 20

 

Description

This lesson will analyze how the two party system has affected American history.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Understand the origins of political parties in the United States.
  2. Identify and describe the three periods of single party domination and describe the current era of divided government.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the Venn graphic organizer in the text, p. 94-102.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

 

2. Bellringer: Students will view the two party symbols in a Thomas Nast Political cartoon and write down the qualities associated with these animals. Discussion will be based on these and what students believe Nast’s purpose was using these two principals.

3. Introduce topic: Analyzing political parties through political cartoons.

4. Students will read Ch. 5 Section 2 and complete the political cartoon worksheet.

5. Students will discuss the last question on the worksheet on the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 might affect party balance and how events such as new technology, major historical events and cultural change can affect attitudes about political parties.

 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the political party worksheet.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 21

 

Description

This lesson is designed to suffrage rights, voting requirements, and the historical relationship between voting and Civil Rights.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

            7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under

the law.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Examine the reasons for expansion of voting rights.

2. Analyze how voting qualification have changed over time.

3. Identify historical barriers and voter discrimination trends that have affected African-Americans historically.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Organize the class into three groups and assign each group a section from the chapter.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students groups will create a presentation detailing the main points of the section.

3. As the groups give their presentations they will create a study guide on the Smart Board outlining each section’s main points.

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on class presentations

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Noble

Thursday, Feb. 23

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 23

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 16

 

Description

This lesson the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will complete required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the exam

World History and Government Lesson Plans 2/06 to 2/09

ThLesson Plans 4/12-4/15

World History The Cold War
Origins

After working together to defeat the Axis Powers in Europe and in the Pacific, relations between the Soviet Union and its western Allies quickly soured. The first cracks in the relationship appeared before the war ended at the Potsdam Conference, where Allied leaders found common ground on the future of Germany but clashed over Soviet demands for friendly "buffer" states between it and its enemy in two devastating world wars. This hairline fracture soon became a gaping chasm as East and West sought to shore up allies, first in Europe and then in Asia, Africa and Latin America. It was, in fact, in the Third World, which was emerging from centuries of European domination, that the Cold War became "hot." Unwilling to risk the nuclear Armageddon that a direct conflict would surely bring, the superpowers instead focused their military efforts on establishing friendly states around the globe. So while the poles of the Cold War were centered in the US and Soviet Union, the magnetic field of the conflict encompassed the entire world. It is this global nature of the conflict that provides the context for the unit's essential question: How did Cold War tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union impact the economic, social and political development of former European colonies in the Third World?

 

 

 

Tuesday and Wednesday

Objectives: 1) Compare and contrast the causes and courses of World Wars I and II; 2) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II; 3) Explain the United States' policy of containment

Class Work: Document-Based Question; paragraph writing; guided reading

 

Thursday

Objectives: 1) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II;

Class Work: Guided note-taking on movie, Atomic Cafe

 

Friday

Objectives: 1) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II; 2) Analyze the role of nuclear weapons in keeping the conflict between the US and USSR "cold"

Class Work: Guided note-taking on movie; Analyze political cartoon

 

Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 6

 

Description

This lesson is designed to examine the formal amendment process for the U.S. Constitution

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 2: The student will describe the historic and philosophical foundations of the United States republican system of government.

            6. Analyze the steps of the constitutional amendment process including examples of recent attempts to amend the United States Constitution as exemplified in the issues of the Equal Rights Amendment and flag desecration.  

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Compare the process of ratification of amendments by studying charts.
  2. Identify the four different ways by which the Constitution may be changed.
  3. Understand that while many amendments have been proposed, only a select group has been ratified.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the graphic organizer in the text, p. 79-83.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Introduction of the topic: the students will be informed that today the class will discuss the formal amendment process. The discussion will center around the following discussion questions; A. What has been the most often used method for ratification and why?  B. How many of the amendments were ratified this way? C. What method was used to ratify the 21st Amendment and why?  D. Describe the other two methods for ratification.  
3. Students will read the section.

4.  Class discussion.

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the class discussion.

 

 

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 7

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how basic legislation has added to our understanding of the Constitution over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the executive and legislative branches have interpreted the Constitution.

3. Analyze the role of party practices and custom in interpreting the Constitution.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will read the section, p. 85-88, then complete the cause and effect chart on p. 85.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will identify and discuss the five methods in which change occurs.

4. Students will hand in their cause and effects charts as an assessment. 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their completion of the graphic organizer on p. 85. This is a two column cause and effect chart that must include separate items for each column.

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Thursday, Feb. 08

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how basic legislation has added to our understanding of the Constitution over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the executive and legislative branches have interpreted the Constitution.

3. Analyze the role of party practices and custom in interpreting the Constitution.

 

 

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will re-read the section, p. 85-88, then finish the cause and effect chart on p. 85.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will identify and discuss the five methods in which change occurs.

4. Students will hand in their cause and effects charts as an assessment. 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their completion of the graphic organizer on p. 85. This is a two column cause and effect chart that must include separate items for each column.

 

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 09

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how federal and state governments interact and share powers over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the Federal and State governments use expressed and implied powers.

 

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will read the section, p. 90-95, then engage in discussion.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will discuss the use of implied and expressed powers at the State and Federal levels.

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their response to discussion questions.

World History and Government Lesson Plans 1/22 to 1/26

World History

World War II

Monday-The Home Front

During World War II African Americans found themselves with conflicting feelings about supporting the war effort when their own country did not offer them the freedom America was fighting for overseas.   The Double Victory - Double V - campaign, begun by the Pittsburgh Courier newspaper in 1942, helped to address this issue.  It encouraged African Americans to participate at every level in winning the war abroad, while simultaneously fighting for their civil rights at home.

Tuesday-Nazism and Fascism

Between 1933 and 1945, Nazi Germany and its collaborators pursued a program to systematically persecute and destroy six million Jews. Nazi ideology identified other enemies; they were targeted for racial, ethnic or political reasons.

During this lesson, high school students will understand the German National Socialism (Nazi) extermination campaign against European Jewry and other targeted groups within the context of World War II history; appraise responses to the Holocaust by governments and individuals; reflect on racism and stereotyping; and reflect on responsibility and remembrance

Wednesday-D Day

General Dwight D. Eisenhower wrote his “order of the day” on D-Day, the Allied invasion of France, which spelled the beginning of the end of the Third Reich and Nazi domination of Europe.  These confident words were given to every person involved in the operation.  However, very few, including Eisenhower himself, had absolute confidence in the mission.  In fact, unknown even to Eisenhower’s inner circle, Ike had already written an announcement the invasion had failed, and that he accepted the blame.

In this lesson, students will investigate the complex aspects of Operation Overlord, including the commanders, geography and history, political, and technological challenges that made this one of the most difficult military operations in history

Thursday and Friday The Pacific War

In this lesson, students will review the historic significance of a controversy involving the Chicago Tribune, which published a series of stories inferring that the US had broken a secret Japanese code, which significantly assisted the US Navy in winning one of the biggest battles of the Pacific Theater of World War II, the Battle of Midway.  Did the Tribune go beyond the First Amendment right of freedom of the press in this instance? 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

1-22-18 to 1-26-18

 

Date: Monday, Tuesday Jan. 22-23

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify and define the basic concepts of democracy.

 

Standards

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

   3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.

   4. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the major ways governmental power is distributed, shared, and structured in unitary, federal, and confederal systems in terms of effectiveness, prevention of abuse of power, and responsiveness to the popular will.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Objectives; Students will-

  1. Identify and explain the five basic concepts of democracy.
  2. Identify real world examples of the five concepts of democracy by brainstorming and completing a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History

2. Bellringer: Students will use a Bellringer worksheet which includes a passage on the Internet and Democracy. Students will read the passage and answer the questions.

3. Students will read Ch. 1 Section 3, pp. 20-24. .

4. Students will complete the graphic organizer on p. 20 and the reading comprehension worksheet handout.

5. Students will share and discuss their answers from the bellringer exercise.
 

 

Assessments-Summative

Students will be assessed through the Understanding of Main Ideas worksheet.

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Wednesday-Friday, 1-24-14 to 1-26-1

 

Description

This lesson is designed to gather required benchmarks and reinforces the previous lesson on the basic concepts of democracy through the use of Jigsaw collaborative learning.

 

Objectives; Students will-

  1. Identify and explain the five basic concepts of democracy.
  2. Identify real world examples of the five concepts of democracy by brainstorming and completing a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

            3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.   

 

Procedures

Quote of the Day and Today in History

  1. Students will be given a short multiple choice test to gather required benchmark data.
  2. The class will be divided into groups and each will be assigned a particular concept of democracy.
  3. Each group will become teaching experts and then will in turn teach the other groups on each concept.

 

Assessment-Formative

Students understanding will be assessed based on a guided discussion on the five concepts of democracy.

World History and Government Lesson Plans 1/16 to 1/19

Class: Periods 2-5                                         Topic:  The Rise of Fascism    

  

 

Tuesday

Political Upheaval in the 1920’s

Instructional Objectives:

Knowledge:

The pupils

  • Students know about the World War 1.
  • Students know about the Triple Alliance.
  • Students know about the Treaty of Versailles

Understanding

The pupils

  • To Understand the Rise of Dictatorship in Italy.
  • To understand the common factors in Italy and Germany, which led to the rise of dictatorship in Italy and Germany?  
  • To understand the cause of the rise of the fascist.                

 Critical Thinking:

The pupils

  • Critically evaluate The rise of Fascism and Nazism and the second world war
  • Critically think about the cause for the rise of Fascism in Italy.

Skill:

The pupils

  • Draw the flow chart on the causes of the rise of fascist dictatorship in Italy.
  • Draw the timeline of the rise of Fascism and its causes.

Teaching Points

 

  1. The rise of dictatorships in Italy.
  2. Mussolini, dictator of Italy brought fascism in Italy.
  3. Fascism and its meaning
  4. Rise of Mussolini.

Map of Political Post war Europe, Picture of prominent leaders, Timeline of rise of Fascism, Diagrammatic Representation.

Tuesday and Wednesday

1924 – THE YEAR THAT MADE HITLER

Objective: To have students analyze, evaluate the rise of Hitler through sourcing and annotating complex text reading. 

Vocabulary: Mein Kampf, Anti-Semitic, High Treason, Nationalistic, Antiparliamentarian, The Blood and The Fist, Swastika, Volkisch

Bellringer-Quotation Interpretation:

“How it happened that Hitler came to power is still the most important question of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century German history, if not all of German history.”

                                                               -Heinrich August Winkler, Historian, 2000

 

How did Hitler come to power?

WARM UP:   Above

 

INTRODUCTION:  Adolf Hitler spent 1924 behind bars, convicted of treason after an unsuccessful coup against the unstable postwar German government.  It was a year of deep reading and intensive writing, or passionate courtroom speeches, of proselytizing to his fellow inmates, and of working feverishly on Mein Kampf.  It was, in many ways, the year that made Hitler an explosively powerful political force.  Everything that would come – the rallies and riots, the single-minded deployment of a catastrophically evil idea – crystallized in this one defining year.

 

ACTIVITY

 

Part 1 – Claim, Evidence and Reasoning –

 

Author’s Claim:  1924 was the year that made Hitler

 

 Students will prove or disprove using text. 

 

Part 2 – Share Out Discussion -

 

Critical Thinking Questions –

 

How was media influential in Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How was the judiciary influential Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How did popular opinion influence Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How did imprisonment act as a haven for Hitler’s “hate ideology’?

 

To what do you attribute the recent rise in anti-Semitic fervor in the United States?

 

 

 

 

Summary &

Assessment:

 

 

 

Text Message:  Similar to a sentence summary, students will write a summary of the key learning in text message format.

 

 

Thursday and Friday

 

Lesson and Question:

HOW CAN WE AVOID THE TRAP OF TYRANNY THAT SURVIVES IN THE REALM OF “ISMS”?

   

Concept Terminology:

Tyranny, Fascism, Nazism, Communism, Marxism, Terrorism, Capitalism, Rule-of-Law, Oligarchy, Paramilitary, Great Terror, Einsatzgruppen, The Great Action, Fahrenheit 451, Orwell 1984, Vaclav Havel, Post-Truth, Solidary Labor Movement, Totalitarianism, Authoritarianism, Intellectual Property, Extremism, Perpetual State of Emergency, Reichstag Fire, Historical Generation

   

 

Warm Up:

 

 

VIDEO – On Tyranny:  Lessons From the 20th Century – Author Interview – Timothy Snyder at the Wilson Center  (11:16 mins)

 

https://youtu.be/A7RBWea31e8

 

According to author, what are the “isms” associated with Tyranny?

 

Quotation Interpretation:  “We don’t recognize history until it knocks on our door” – Timothy Snyder

 

Do you agree/disagree?  Be specific with your response.

 

Lesson Procedure:

 

 

 

WARM UP:   Above

 

INTRODUCTION:  Timothy Snyder gives us a new translation and interpretation to historical experiences, including Nazism, Fascism, Communism and Terrorism as precursors to Tyranny focusing on our need to recognize the structures of disaster as they unfold, as well as society stopping and thinking before we accept a new reality or ideology.  Tyrants are known to crafting alternative realities that people have readily adopted rather than questioned.

 

ACTIVITY

 

Students will analyze, evaluate, annotate and synthesize excerpted secondary source based on Timothy Snyder’s book entitled On Tyranny:  Lessons From the 20th Century using Silent Sustainable Reading Strategy.  Students will formulate a THESIS and support with evidence from the text.  Upon completion they will engage in a Conversation With Yourself  before Turn and Talk to discuss the following

Critical Thinking Questions in a Share Out format:

 

According to the author:

 

  1. How did tyrannical behavior unfold during Nazi Germany and during the Russian Revolution?  Cite evidence from the text.
  2. How can media or collective memory craft alternative realities?
  3. Should people “stop and think” and question new ideologies before blindly accepting them as truth?
  4. If we are to formulate a historical generation, how do we recognize the signs of impending tyranny as vigilant citizens?

 

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Periods-4, Monday-Friday, 1-16-18 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Monday

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify, compare, and contrast differing forms of government in the world today.

 

Standards

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

           

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Preparations

Prepare information using examples of different governments throughout the world for comparisons. MacGruder's American Government by Prentice Hall. Have students read Chapter 1 Section 2,pp. 12-18, followed by a formmative assessment (Forms of government and concepts of democracy).

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History

2. Bellringer: Students will copy a list from the Smart Board; direct democracy, indirect democracy, dictatorship, unitary government, federal government, confederation, presidential government, and parliamentary government. They will then circle each term that describes the U.S. government, then define each circled term.

3. Students will share and discuss their classifications that define The U.S. government.

4. Students will read pp. 12-14 on Participation and participate in Guided Discussion
5. FORMS OF GOVERNMENT-- Guided Discussion-(Where is the Power?)--UNITARY- a centralized government where all powers held by the government belong to a single, central agency. (Most gov'ts are unitary in form) Federal government-one in which the powers of government are divided between a central government and several local governments. CONFEDERATE GOV'T-an alliance of independent states. Most power is held by independent states leaving the central government weak. Explain the relationship between legislative & executive agencies--Presidential: separation of powers between the legislative and executive branches of government. Parliamentary: Executive is made up of the prime minister or premier and that of officials’ cabinet. They themselves are members of the legislative branch, the parliament. Dictatorship exists where those who rule cannot be held responsible to the will of the people.-dictatorship is probably the oldest & most common form of government known..

6. Discuss dictatorships based on the following; Why do dictatorships tend to endure for decades?  Why do dictatorships tend to go hand in hand with military power? What circumstances are likely to create a dictatorship?

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be based on a class discussion on why Dictatorships adopt some form of democratic governments, such as popular election and elected legislative bodies?

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Periods-4, Monday-Friday, 1-1618 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Tuesday and Wednesday

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify, compare, and contrast differing forms of government in the world today.

 

Objectives

  1. Students will compare and contrast democracies and dictatorships by predicting their responses in different situations.
  2. Classify governments according to three sets of characteristics.

3. Define governments based on who can participate

 

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

CS 1.2. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics

 

Preparations

Prepare information using examples of different governments throughout the world for comparisons. MacGruder's American Government by Prentice Hall. Have students read Chapter 1 Section 2,pp. 12-18, followed by a formative assessment (Forms of government and concepts of democracy).

 

 

Procedures

Students will be given a reading comprehension worksheet to complete. The students will read Ch. 1 Section 2, pp. 12-18. Students will complete the worksheet and then as a separate assignment answer the Section 2 Assessment questions #2, #3, and #5.

 

Assessment-Summative

Students understanding will be assessed based on the Reading Comprehension Worksheet and the Section assessment questions on p. 18.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 1-18-18 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Thursday and Friday

 

Description

This lesson will identify and explain the five concepts of democracy by using a graphic organizer and teach students to identify real-world examples of the five concepts.

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

CS 1.2. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics.        

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Identify and explain the five concepts of democracy by completing a graphic organizer.
  2. Identify real world examples by brainstorming and filling out a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Preparation

Assign Chapter 1 Section 3, pp. 20-24 and the graphic organizer in the text.

 

 

Procedure

Today in History and Quote of the Day

  1. Following the reading and completion of the students’ graphic organizers have volunteers provide definitions and express what each concept means to them.
  2. Ask the students what the term Free Enterprise means to them.
  3. Extend the discussion by asking the students the following questions; Why might going to school be a duty instead of a responsibility? Should volunteering be a duty rather than a responsibility? What would be the benefits of making voting a duty? What might happen if serving on a jury was a responsibility rather than a duty?

 

Assessment-Summative and Formative

Students graphic organizers 

Sectionalism and Civil War

World History Lesson Plans

Monday-Thursday 11/13 to 11/17

 

Lesson Plans 10/23 to 10/27

World History

Monday-Wednesday

Inventors of the Industrial Revolution

Interactive Powerepoint presentation

Have students complete the Inventor Chart and also require that they write questions they would like to know more about---one for each invention category. Do NOT have them take the quiz right away. Reconvene the class to share these questions for discussion and clarification purposes. Then have students return to the laptops for the quiz.

As a class discussion and lesson, have each student hypothesize what would have happened without a certain inventor by “subtracting” from the classroom, describing of things we use today traced back to the Industrial Revolution. For example, Betty says, “I subtract everything woven. We would all be wearing handwoven or hand-knit clothing if it weren’t for the Power Loom. If the class is split into two teams, they can earn points and compete by coming up with valid ideas.

  • Since the activities will take more than one class day- possibly as many as 3 or 4- have students recall something about each invention group from the day before to “earn” the right to be Vanna… or let the class play “stump Vanna” with invention questions from the previous days to remove the board operator and replace him/her. It is sometimes very helpful to have your most active and disruptive student operate the board because it keeps him/her on task and focused.
  •  
World History Lesson Plans 8/28 to 9/1

  Monday and Tuesday

 

Islamic Contributions to the World

 

 

Drinking industry and Distilled liquids

It was Muslim chemists who first invented pure distillation processes, which could fully purify chemical substances.
Purified distilled alcohol by Jabir ibn Hayyan in the 8th century

 

Hygiene industries

True soap made of vegetable oils (such as olive oil) or with

aromatics (such as thyme oil)were invented by al-Razi Rhazes.  Perfumed and colored soaps and liquid and solid soaps were also invented by Muslim chemists as well.

 

Islamic Astronomy: Astronomical instruments

Muslim astronomers developed a number of astronomical instruments, These instruments were used by Muslims for a variety of purposes related to astronomy, astrology, horoscopes, navigation, surveying, and timekeeping.

 

Analog Machines (or Computers)

The Plate of Conjunctions, a computing instrument used to determine the time of day invented by al-Kashi in the 15th century. A mechanical planetary computer called the Plate of Zones could predict the true positions in longitude of the Sun and Moon, and the planets in terms of elliptical orbits.

 

Parachute

In 9th century Islamic Spain, Abbas Ibn Firnas (Armen Firnas) invented a primitive version of the parachute and the hand glider.

 

Camera

Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen), the "father of optics" and pioneer of the modern scientific method, invented the camera obscura and pinhole camera.He was the first person to realize that rays of light enters the eye, rather than leaving it, The word "camera" comes from the Arabic word qamara for a dark or private room. Ibn al-Haytham first described pinhole camera after noticing the way light came through a hole in window shutters.

 

Chemical technology

Jabir ibn Hayyan (Geber), the father of chemistry, invented the alembic still and many chemicals, including distilled alcohol, and established the perfume industry.

 

Street lighting and litter collection facilities

The first street lamps were built in the Arab Empire, especially in Cordoba, which also had the first facilities and waste containers for litter collection.

 

Clock technology



Astronomical clocks
Muslim astronomers and engineers constructed a variety of highly accurate astronomical clocks for use in their observatories.

 

Mechanical clocks

The first mechanical clocks driven by weights, and gears and were invented by Muslim engineers. The first geared mechanical clocks were invented by the 11th century Arab engineer Ibn Khalaf al-Muradi from Islamic Spain.

 

Paper mill

Paper was introduced to the Muslim world by Chinese prisoners after the Battle of Talas. Muslims made several improvements to papermaking and built the first paper mills in Baghdad, Iraq, as early as 794.

 

Sugar refinery

The first sugar refineries were built by Muslim engineers. They were first driven by water mills, and then windmills from the 9th and 10th centuries in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iran.

 

Fountain pen

The earliest historical record of a reservoir fountain pen dates back to the 10th century. In 953, Ma'ad al-Mu'izz, the caliph of Egypt, demanded a pen, which would not stain his hands or clothes, and was provided with a pen, which held ink in a reservoir.

 

On/off switch

The on and off switch was invented by Muslim engineers between the 9th and 12th centuries. It was employed in a variety of automatic and water clocks. The mechanism later had an influence on the development of the electric on/off switch, which appeared in the 1950s

 

Medical Technology

Muslim physicians pioneered a number of medical treatments, including: Tracheotomy by Ibn Zuhr in the 12th century. Muslim anesthesiologist invented inoculations, modern oral and inhalant anesthesia as well as the first smallpox vaccine in the form of cowpox. At least 2,000 medicinal substances were invented by Muslim technology.

 

Medical university and public hospital

The Islamic hospital-universities were the first free public hospitals, the first medical schools, and the first universities to issue diplomas. The first of these institutions was opened in Baghdad. They then appeared in Egypt from 872 and then in Islamic Spain, Persia and the Maghreb thereafter. Physicians and surgeons at Islamic hospital-universities gave lectures to medical students and a diploma would be issued to any student who completed his/her education and was qualified to be a doctor of Medicine.

 

Military technology

After the spread of early gunpowder from China to the Muslim world, Muslim chemists and engineers developed compositions for explosive gunpowder and their own weapons for use in gunpowder warfare.

 

Hand cannon, handgun, portable firearms

The first portable hand cannons (midfa) loaded with explosive gunpowder, the first example of a handgun and portable firearms were used by the Egyptians to repel the Mongols at the Battle of Ain Jalut in 1260, and again in 1304. 

 

Wednesday and Thursday

THE ENLIGHTENMENT  

Until the late 1700’s, people of France accepted the fact that their king ruled by divine right, that Church teachings were correct, and that well-to-do nobles had privileges not enjoyed by the poor. But by the end of the century, Frenchmen no longer accepted these beliefs. This change in attitude came about as the result of writings by a group know as the ‘philisophes’. The philisophes were intelligent, reasonable men who felt there was much about life in Europe that was unfair and unjust. Since most philosophes were from France and since France was ruled by an absolute monarchy surrounded by a privileged nobility, the French way of life came under particular attack. The chart which follows lists four leading thinkers of the 1700’s. They published writings during a perid called the Age of Reason, or Enlightenment. Many ideas from the Enlightenment were eventually adopted by countries in Europe and around the world. Ideas even spread to the United States and are today a part of our way of life. Read each statement by the philisophes given on the chart and decide whether the statement is a true description of present American life. If it is true of the United States today, fill in the space with yes. If the ideas or attitude is not true of present life in the U.S., put no in the space. 

The philisophes were intelligent, reasonable men who felt there was much about life in Europe that was unfair and unjust. Since most philosophes were from France and since France was ruled by an absolute monarchy surrounded by a privileged nobility, the French way of life came under particular attack. The chart which follows lists four leading thinkers of the 1700’s. They published writings during a perid called the Age of Reason, or Enlightenment. Many ideas from the Enlightenment were eventually adopted by countries in Europe and around the world. Ideas even spread to the United States and are today a part of our way of life. Read each statement by the philisophes given on the chart and decide whether the statement is a true description of present American life. If it is true of the United States today, fill in the space with yes. If the ideas or attitude is not true of present life in the U.S., put no in the space. 

John Locke 1. All men are free and equal at birth. 2. Everyone has the right to life liberty, & property. 3. Citizens have the right to overthrow the government when their natural rights are violated. 4. Rulers receive the right to govern from the people and unfair rulers can be forced from power. 5. Man is not born to be a good or evil person – he is made one way or other by his life experiences and society around him. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ Baron de Montesquieu 1. An absolute ruler in an  Baron de Montesquieu 1. An absolute ruler in an undesirable leader because one-man rule limits basic freedoms such as speech, press, and religion. 2. There should be a ‘separation of powers’ in government between legislative, executive and judicial. 3. Slavery, torture, religious persecution, and censorship are all wrong. 4. A man is innocent until proven guilty. 5. When one country increases its military power, so do other countries; therefore all nations should limit their military strength in order to reduce the chances of war. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______   

Voltaire 1. A man should not be persecuted because of his religious beliefs. 2. Religious myths and ceremonies do nothing to make men better and should therefore be ignored. 3. Clergymen are more interested in increasing the power of the Church that they are in making man better. 4. A scientist is a greater person then a conquering general. 5. All men should be treated as equals and should have freedom of the speech and of the press. 6. Democracy is not a good form of government because the common people are not capable of governing themselves; the best government is one headed by a good and fair king. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ 6. _______ 

Rousseau 1. It is unfair that some people are rich while other people are poor. 2. The rich should not enjoy special privileges. 3. Compared to man during the Stone Age, modern man is unhappy, insecure, and greedy. 4. Social and political reforms must be made before man can be a good person. 5. Democracy is a good form of government. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ 

QUESTIONS: 1. In the philosophes were alive today, do you think they would be generally satisfied or dissatisfied with social conditions and the type of government we have today. EXPLAIN! _______________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ 2. Which three statements by the philosophes do you believe are of the greatest importance to mankind? a. ___________________________________________________________________ b. ___________________________________________________________________ c. ___________________________________________________________________

 

  3. Choose one of the statements and tell why you disagree with it. a. Statement: __________________________________________________________ b. Reason for disagreement ________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 4. Not all the philosophes held the same beliefs, but most agreed that: a. Reason should be used at all times b. The search for new knowledge and ideas should continue c. Improvements must be made in the system of justice to end unfair jail sentences, the torture of prisoners, and terrible conditions in prisons. d. Slavery and warfare should be done away with e. Freedom of religion, speech and press must be given to all f. Everyone should enjoy liberty and equality. g. There should be public education for all, not just schools for children of the wealthy.  

Bill Nobles

Upcoming Events

Bill Nobles Lesson Plans World History

World History and Government Lesson Plans 2/20 to 2/23

World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 2/20 to Friday 2/23

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page. 

 

 

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 20

 

Description

This lesson will analyze how the two party system has affected American history.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Understand the origins of political parties in the United States.
  2. Identify and describe the three periods of single party domination and describe the current era of divided government.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the Venn graphic organizer in the text, p. 94-102.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

 

2. Bellringer: Students will view the two party symbols in a Thomas Nast Political cartoon and write down the qualities associated with these animals. Discussion will be based on these and what students believe Nast’s purpose was using these two principals.

3. Introduce topic: Analyzing political parties through political cartoons.

4. Students will read Ch. 5 Section 2 and complete the political cartoon worksheet.

5. Students will discuss the last question on the worksheet on the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 might affect party balance and how events such as new technology, major historical events and cultural change can affect attitudes about political parties.

 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the political party worksheet.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 21

 

Description

This lesson is designed to suffrage rights, voting requirements, and the historical relationship between voting and Civil Rights.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

            7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under

the law.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Examine the reasons for expansion of voting rights.

2. Analyze how voting qualification have changed over time.

3. Identify historical barriers and voter discrimination trends that have affected African-Americans historically.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Organize the class into three groups and assign each group a section from the chapter.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students groups will create a presentation detailing the main points of the section.

3. As the groups give their presentations they will create a study guide on the Smart Board outlining each section’s main points.

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on class presentations

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Noble

Thursday, Feb. 23

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 23

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 16

 

Description

This lesson the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will complete required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the exam

World History and Government Lesson Plans 2/06 to 2/09

ThLesson Plans 4/12-4/15

World History The Cold War
Origins

After working together to defeat the Axis Powers in Europe and in the Pacific, relations between the Soviet Union and its western Allies quickly soured. The first cracks in the relationship appeared before the war ended at the Potsdam Conference, where Allied leaders found common ground on the future of Germany but clashed over Soviet demands for friendly "buffer" states between it and its enemy in two devastating world wars. This hairline fracture soon became a gaping chasm as East and West sought to shore up allies, first in Europe and then in Asia, Africa and Latin America. It was, in fact, in the Third World, which was emerging from centuries of European domination, that the Cold War became "hot." Unwilling to risk the nuclear Armageddon that a direct conflict would surely bring, the superpowers instead focused their military efforts on establishing friendly states around the globe. So while the poles of the Cold War were centered in the US and Soviet Union, the magnetic field of the conflict encompassed the entire world. It is this global nature of the conflict that provides the context for the unit's essential question: How did Cold War tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union impact the economic, social and political development of former European colonies in the Third World?

 

 

 

Tuesday and Wednesday

Objectives: 1) Compare and contrast the causes and courses of World Wars I and II; 2) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II; 3) Explain the United States' policy of containment

Class Work: Document-Based Question; paragraph writing; guided reading

 

Thursday

Objectives: 1) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II;

Class Work: Guided note-taking on movie, Atomic Cafe

 

Friday

Objectives: 1) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II; 2) Analyze the role of nuclear weapons in keeping the conflict between the US and USSR "cold"

Class Work: Guided note-taking on movie; Analyze political cartoon

 

Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 6

 

Description

This lesson is designed to examine the formal amendment process for the U.S. Constitution

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 2: The student will describe the historic and philosophical foundations of the United States republican system of government.

            6. Analyze the steps of the constitutional amendment process including examples of recent attempts to amend the United States Constitution as exemplified in the issues of the Equal Rights Amendment and flag desecration.  

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Compare the process of ratification of amendments by studying charts.
  2. Identify the four different ways by which the Constitution may be changed.
  3. Understand that while many amendments have been proposed, only a select group has been ratified.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the graphic organizer in the text, p. 79-83.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Introduction of the topic: the students will be informed that today the class will discuss the formal amendment process. The discussion will center around the following discussion questions; A. What has been the most often used method for ratification and why?  B. How many of the amendments were ratified this way? C. What method was used to ratify the 21st Amendment and why?  D. Describe the other two methods for ratification.  
3. Students will read the section.

4.  Class discussion.

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the class discussion.

 

 

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 7

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how basic legislation has added to our understanding of the Constitution over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the executive and legislative branches have interpreted the Constitution.

3. Analyze the role of party practices and custom in interpreting the Constitution.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will read the section, p. 85-88, then complete the cause and effect chart on p. 85.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will identify and discuss the five methods in which change occurs.

4. Students will hand in their cause and effects charts as an assessment. 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their completion of the graphic organizer on p. 85. This is a two column cause and effect chart that must include separate items for each column.

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Thursday, Feb. 08

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how basic legislation has added to our understanding of the Constitution over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the executive and legislative branches have interpreted the Constitution.

3. Analyze the role of party practices and custom in interpreting the Constitution.

 

 

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will re-read the section, p. 85-88, then finish the cause and effect chart on p. 85.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will identify and discuss the five methods in which change occurs.

4. Students will hand in their cause and effects charts as an assessment. 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their completion of the graphic organizer on p. 85. This is a two column cause and effect chart that must include separate items for each column.

 

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 09

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how federal and state governments interact and share powers over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the Federal and State governments use expressed and implied powers.

 

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will read the section, p. 90-95, then engage in discussion.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will discuss the use of implied and expressed powers at the State and Federal levels.

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their response to discussion questions.

World History and Government Lesson Plans 1/22 to 1/26

World History

World War II

Monday-The Home Front

During World War II African Americans found themselves with conflicting feelings about supporting the war effort when their own country did not offer them the freedom America was fighting for overseas.   The Double Victory - Double V - campaign, begun by the Pittsburgh Courier newspaper in 1942, helped to address this issue.  It encouraged African Americans to participate at every level in winning the war abroad, while simultaneously fighting for their civil rights at home.

Tuesday-Nazism and Fascism

Between 1933 and 1945, Nazi Germany and its collaborators pursued a program to systematically persecute and destroy six million Jews. Nazi ideology identified other enemies; they were targeted for racial, ethnic or political reasons.

During this lesson, high school students will understand the German National Socialism (Nazi) extermination campaign against European Jewry and other targeted groups within the context of World War II history; appraise responses to the Holocaust by governments and individuals; reflect on racism and stereotyping; and reflect on responsibility and remembrance

Wednesday-D Day

General Dwight D. Eisenhower wrote his “order of the day” on D-Day, the Allied invasion of France, which spelled the beginning of the end of the Third Reich and Nazi domination of Europe.  These confident words were given to every person involved in the operation.  However, very few, including Eisenhower himself, had absolute confidence in the mission.  In fact, unknown even to Eisenhower’s inner circle, Ike had already written an announcement the invasion had failed, and that he accepted the blame.

In this lesson, students will investigate the complex aspects of Operation Overlord, including the commanders, geography and history, political, and technological challenges that made this one of the most difficult military operations in history

Thursday and Friday The Pacific War

In this lesson, students will review the historic significance of a controversy involving the Chicago Tribune, which published a series of stories inferring that the US had broken a secret Japanese code, which significantly assisted the US Navy in winning one of the biggest battles of the Pacific Theater of World War II, the Battle of Midway.  Did the Tribune go beyond the First Amendment right of freedom of the press in this instance? 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

1-22-18 to 1-26-18

 

Date: Monday, Tuesday Jan. 22-23

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify and define the basic concepts of democracy.

 

Standards

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

   3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.

   4. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the major ways governmental power is distributed, shared, and structured in unitary, federal, and confederal systems in terms of effectiveness, prevention of abuse of power, and responsiveness to the popular will.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Objectives; Students will-

  1. Identify and explain the five basic concepts of democracy.
  2. Identify real world examples of the five concepts of democracy by brainstorming and completing a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History

2. Bellringer: Students will use a Bellringer worksheet which includes a passage on the Internet and Democracy. Students will read the passage and answer the questions.

3. Students will read Ch. 1 Section 3, pp. 20-24. .

4. Students will complete the graphic organizer on p. 20 and the reading comprehension worksheet handout.

5. Students will share and discuss their answers from the bellringer exercise.
 

 

Assessments-Summative

Students will be assessed through the Understanding of Main Ideas worksheet.

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Wednesday-Friday, 1-24-14 to 1-26-1

 

Description

This lesson is designed to gather required benchmarks and reinforces the previous lesson on the basic concepts of democracy through the use of Jigsaw collaborative learning.

 

Objectives; Students will-

  1. Identify and explain the five basic concepts of democracy.
  2. Identify real world examples of the five concepts of democracy by brainstorming and completing a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

            3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.   

 

Procedures

Quote of the Day and Today in History

  1. Students will be given a short multiple choice test to gather required benchmark data.
  2. The class will be divided into groups and each will be assigned a particular concept of democracy.
  3. Each group will become teaching experts and then will in turn teach the other groups on each concept.

 

Assessment-Formative

Students understanding will be assessed based on a guided discussion on the five concepts of democracy.

World History and Government Lesson Plans 1/16 to 1/19

Class: Periods 2-5                                         Topic:  The Rise of Fascism    

  

 

Tuesday

Political Upheaval in the 1920’s

Instructional Objectives:

Knowledge:

The pupils

  • Students know about the World War 1.
  • Students know about the Triple Alliance.
  • Students know about the Treaty of Versailles

Understanding

The pupils

  • To Understand the Rise of Dictatorship in Italy.
  • To understand the common factors in Italy and Germany, which led to the rise of dictatorship in Italy and Germany?  
  • To understand the cause of the rise of the fascist.                

 Critical Thinking:

The pupils

  • Critically evaluate The rise of Fascism and Nazism and the second world war
  • Critically think about the cause for the rise of Fascism in Italy.

Skill:

The pupils

  • Draw the flow chart on the causes of the rise of fascist dictatorship in Italy.
  • Draw the timeline of the rise of Fascism and its causes.

Teaching Points

 

  1. The rise of dictatorships in Italy.
  2. Mussolini, dictator of Italy brought fascism in Italy.
  3. Fascism and its meaning
  4. Rise of Mussolini.

Map of Political Post war Europe, Picture of prominent leaders, Timeline of rise of Fascism, Diagrammatic Representation.

Tuesday and Wednesday

1924 – THE YEAR THAT MADE HITLER

Objective: To have students analyze, evaluate the rise of Hitler through sourcing and annotating complex text reading. 

Vocabulary: Mein Kampf, Anti-Semitic, High Treason, Nationalistic, Antiparliamentarian, The Blood and The Fist, Swastika, Volkisch

Bellringer-Quotation Interpretation:

“How it happened that Hitler came to power is still the most important question of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century German history, if not all of German history.”

                                                               -Heinrich August Winkler, Historian, 2000

 

How did Hitler come to power?

WARM UP:   Above

 

INTRODUCTION:  Adolf Hitler spent 1924 behind bars, convicted of treason after an unsuccessful coup against the unstable postwar German government.  It was a year of deep reading and intensive writing, or passionate courtroom speeches, of proselytizing to his fellow inmates, and of working feverishly on Mein Kampf.  It was, in many ways, the year that made Hitler an explosively powerful political force.  Everything that would come – the rallies and riots, the single-minded deployment of a catastrophically evil idea – crystallized in this one defining year.

 

ACTIVITY

 

Part 1 – Claim, Evidence and Reasoning –

 

Author’s Claim:  1924 was the year that made Hitler

 

 Students will prove or disprove using text. 

 

Part 2 – Share Out Discussion -

 

Critical Thinking Questions –

 

How was media influential in Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How was the judiciary influential Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How did popular opinion influence Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How did imprisonment act as a haven for Hitler’s “hate ideology’?

 

To what do you attribute the recent rise in anti-Semitic fervor in the United States?

 

 

 

 

Summary &

Assessment:

 

 

 

Text Message:  Similar to a sentence summary, students will write a summary of the key learning in text message format.

 

 

Thursday and Friday

 

Lesson and Question:

HOW CAN WE AVOID THE TRAP OF TYRANNY THAT SURVIVES IN THE REALM OF “ISMS”?

   

Concept Terminology:

Tyranny, Fascism, Nazism, Communism, Marxism, Terrorism, Capitalism, Rule-of-Law, Oligarchy, Paramilitary, Great Terror, Einsatzgruppen, The Great Action, Fahrenheit 451, Orwell 1984, Vaclav Havel, Post-Truth, Solidary Labor Movement, Totalitarianism, Authoritarianism, Intellectual Property, Extremism, Perpetual State of Emergency, Reichstag Fire, Historical Generation

   

 

Warm Up:

 

 

VIDEO – On Tyranny:  Lessons From the 20th Century – Author Interview – Timothy Snyder at the Wilson Center  (11:16 mins)

 

https://youtu.be/A7RBWea31e8

 

According to author, what are the “isms” associated with Tyranny?

 

Quotation Interpretation:  “We don’t recognize history until it knocks on our door” – Timothy Snyder

 

Do you agree/disagree?  Be specific with your response.

 

Lesson Procedure:

 

 

 

WARM UP:   Above

 

INTRODUCTION:  Timothy Snyder gives us a new translation and interpretation to historical experiences, including Nazism, Fascism, Communism and Terrorism as precursors to Tyranny focusing on our need to recognize the structures of disaster as they unfold, as well as society stopping and thinking before we accept a new reality or ideology.  Tyrants are known to crafting alternative realities that people have readily adopted rather than questioned.

 

ACTIVITY

 

Students will analyze, evaluate, annotate and synthesize excerpted secondary source based on Timothy Snyder’s book entitled On Tyranny:  Lessons From the 20th Century using Silent Sustainable Reading Strategy.  Students will formulate a THESIS and support with evidence from the text.  Upon completion they will engage in a Conversation With Yourself  before Turn and Talk to discuss the following

Critical Thinking Questions in a Share Out format:

 

According to the author:

 

  1. How did tyrannical behavior unfold during Nazi Germany and during the Russian Revolution?  Cite evidence from the text.
  2. How can media or collective memory craft alternative realities?
  3. Should people “stop and think” and question new ideologies before blindly accepting them as truth?
  4. If we are to formulate a historical generation, how do we recognize the signs of impending tyranny as vigilant citizens?

 

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Periods-4, Monday-Friday, 1-16-18 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Monday

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify, compare, and contrast differing forms of government in the world today.

 

Standards

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

           

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Preparations

Prepare information using examples of different governments throughout the world for comparisons. MacGruder's American Government by Prentice Hall. Have students read Chapter 1 Section 2,pp. 12-18, followed by a formmative assessment (Forms of government and concepts of democracy).

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History

2. Bellringer: Students will copy a list from the Smart Board; direct democracy, indirect democracy, dictatorship, unitary government, federal government, confederation, presidential government, and parliamentary government. They will then circle each term that describes the U.S. government, then define each circled term.

3. Students will share and discuss their classifications that define The U.S. government.

4. Students will read pp. 12-14 on Participation and participate in Guided Discussion
5. FORMS OF GOVERNMENT-- Guided Discussion-(Where is the Power?)--UNITARY- a centralized government where all powers held by the government belong to a single, central agency. (Most gov'ts are unitary in form) Federal government-one in which the powers of government are divided between a central government and several local governments. CONFEDERATE GOV'T-an alliance of independent states. Most power is held by independent states leaving the central government weak. Explain the relationship between legislative & executive agencies--Presidential: separation of powers between the legislative and executive branches of government. Parliamentary: Executive is made up of the prime minister or premier and that of officials’ cabinet. They themselves are members of the legislative branch, the parliament. Dictatorship exists where those who rule cannot be held responsible to the will of the people.-dictatorship is probably the oldest & most common form of government known..

6. Discuss dictatorships based on the following; Why do dictatorships tend to endure for decades?  Why do dictatorships tend to go hand in hand with military power? What circumstances are likely to create a dictatorship?

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be based on a class discussion on why Dictatorships adopt some form of democratic governments, such as popular election and elected legislative bodies?

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Periods-4, Monday-Friday, 1-1618 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Tuesday and Wednesday

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify, compare, and contrast differing forms of government in the world today.

 

Objectives

  1. Students will compare and contrast democracies and dictatorships by predicting their responses in different situations.
  2. Classify governments according to three sets of characteristics.

3. Define governments based on who can participate

 

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

CS 1.2. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics

 

Preparations

Prepare information using examples of different governments throughout the world for comparisons. MacGruder's American Government by Prentice Hall. Have students read Chapter 1 Section 2,pp. 12-18, followed by a formative assessment (Forms of government and concepts of democracy).

 

 

Procedures

Students will be given a reading comprehension worksheet to complete. The students will read Ch. 1 Section 2, pp. 12-18. Students will complete the worksheet and then as a separate assignment answer the Section 2 Assessment questions #2, #3, and #5.

 

Assessment-Summative

Students understanding will be assessed based on the Reading Comprehension Worksheet and the Section assessment questions on p. 18.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 1-18-18 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Thursday and Friday

 

Description

This lesson will identify and explain the five concepts of democracy by using a graphic organizer and teach students to identify real-world examples of the five concepts.

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

CS 1.2. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics.        

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Identify and explain the five concepts of democracy by completing a graphic organizer.
  2. Identify real world examples by brainstorming and filling out a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Preparation

Assign Chapter 1 Section 3, pp. 20-24 and the graphic organizer in the text.

 

 

Procedure

Today in History and Quote of the Day

  1. Following the reading and completion of the students’ graphic organizers have volunteers provide definitions and express what each concept means to them.
  2. Ask the students what the term Free Enterprise means to them.
  3. Extend the discussion by asking the students the following questions; Why might going to school be a duty instead of a responsibility? Should volunteering be a duty rather than a responsibility? What would be the benefits of making voting a duty? What might happen if serving on a jury was a responsibility rather than a duty?

 

Assessment-Summative and Formative

Students graphic organizers 

Sectionalism and Civil War

World History Lesson Plans

Monday-Thursday 11/13 to 11/17

 

Lesson Plans 10/23 to 10/27

World History

Monday-Wednesday

Inventors of the Industrial Revolution

Interactive Powerepoint presentation

Have students complete the Inventor Chart and also require that they write questions they would like to know more about---one for each invention category. Do NOT have them take the quiz right away. Reconvene the class to share these questions for discussion and clarification purposes. Then have students return to the laptops for the quiz.

As a class discussion and lesson, have each student hypothesize what would have happened without a certain inventor by “subtracting” from the classroom, describing of things we use today traced back to the Industrial Revolution. For example, Betty says, “I subtract everything woven. We would all be wearing handwoven or hand-knit clothing if it weren’t for the Power Loom. If the class is split into two teams, they can earn points and compete by coming up with valid ideas.

  • Since the activities will take more than one class day- possibly as many as 3 or 4- have students recall something about each invention group from the day before to “earn” the right to be Vanna… or let the class play “stump Vanna” with invention questions from the previous days to remove the board operator and replace him/her. It is sometimes very helpful to have your most active and disruptive student operate the board because it keeps him/her on task and focused.
  •  
World History Lesson Plans 8/28 to 9/1

  Monday and Tuesday

 

Islamic Contributions to the World

 

 

Drinking industry and Distilled liquids

It was Muslim chemists who first invented pure distillation processes, which could fully purify chemical substances.
Purified distilled alcohol by Jabir ibn Hayyan in the 8th century

 

Hygiene industries

True soap made of vegetable oils (such as olive oil) or with

aromatics (such as thyme oil)were invented by al-Razi Rhazes.  Perfumed and colored soaps and liquid and solid soaps were also invented by Muslim chemists as well.

 

Islamic Astronomy: Astronomical instruments

Muslim astronomers developed a number of astronomical instruments, These instruments were used by Muslims for a variety of purposes related to astronomy, astrology, horoscopes, navigation, surveying, and timekeeping.

 

Analog Machines (or Computers)

The Plate of Conjunctions, a computing instrument used to determine the time of day invented by al-Kashi in the 15th century. A mechanical planetary computer called the Plate of Zones could predict the true positions in longitude of the Sun and Moon, and the planets in terms of elliptical orbits.

 

Parachute

In 9th century Islamic Spain, Abbas Ibn Firnas (Armen Firnas) invented a primitive version of the parachute and the hand glider.

 

Camera

Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen), the "father of optics" and pioneer of the modern scientific method, invented the camera obscura and pinhole camera.He was the first person to realize that rays of light enters the eye, rather than leaving it, The word "camera" comes from the Arabic word qamara for a dark or private room. Ibn al-Haytham first described pinhole camera after noticing the way light came through a hole in window shutters.

 

Chemical technology

Jabir ibn Hayyan (Geber), the father of chemistry, invented the alembic still and many chemicals, including distilled alcohol, and established the perfume industry.

 

Street lighting and litter collection facilities

The first street lamps were built in the Arab Empire, especially in Cordoba, which also had the first facilities and waste containers for litter collection.

 

Clock technology



Astronomical clocks
Muslim astronomers and engineers constructed a variety of highly accurate astronomical clocks for use in their observatories.

 

Mechanical clocks

The first mechanical clocks driven by weights, and gears and were invented by Muslim engineers. The first geared mechanical clocks were invented by the 11th century Arab engineer Ibn Khalaf al-Muradi from Islamic Spain.

 

Paper mill

Paper was introduced to the Muslim world by Chinese prisoners after the Battle of Talas. Muslims made several improvements to papermaking and built the first paper mills in Baghdad, Iraq, as early as 794.

 

Sugar refinery

The first sugar refineries were built by Muslim engineers. They were first driven by water mills, and then windmills from the 9th and 10th centuries in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iran.

 

Fountain pen

The earliest historical record of a reservoir fountain pen dates back to the 10th century. In 953, Ma'ad al-Mu'izz, the caliph of Egypt, demanded a pen, which would not stain his hands or clothes, and was provided with a pen, which held ink in a reservoir.

 

On/off switch

The on and off switch was invented by Muslim engineers between the 9th and 12th centuries. It was employed in a variety of automatic and water clocks. The mechanism later had an influence on the development of the electric on/off switch, which appeared in the 1950s

 

Medical Technology

Muslim physicians pioneered a number of medical treatments, including: Tracheotomy by Ibn Zuhr in the 12th century. Muslim anesthesiologist invented inoculations, modern oral and inhalant anesthesia as well as the first smallpox vaccine in the form of cowpox. At least 2,000 medicinal substances were invented by Muslim technology.

 

Medical university and public hospital

The Islamic hospital-universities were the first free public hospitals, the first medical schools, and the first universities to issue diplomas. The first of these institutions was opened in Baghdad. They then appeared in Egypt from 872 and then in Islamic Spain, Persia and the Maghreb thereafter. Physicians and surgeons at Islamic hospital-universities gave lectures to medical students and a diploma would be issued to any student who completed his/her education and was qualified to be a doctor of Medicine.

 

Military technology

After the spread of early gunpowder from China to the Muslim world, Muslim chemists and engineers developed compositions for explosive gunpowder and their own weapons for use in gunpowder warfare.

 

Hand cannon, handgun, portable firearms

The first portable hand cannons (midfa) loaded with explosive gunpowder, the first example of a handgun and portable firearms were used by the Egyptians to repel the Mongols at the Battle of Ain Jalut in 1260, and again in 1304. 

 

Wednesday and Thursday

THE ENLIGHTENMENT  

Until the late 1700’s, people of France accepted the fact that their king ruled by divine right, that Church teachings were correct, and that well-to-do nobles had privileges not enjoyed by the poor. But by the end of the century, Frenchmen no longer accepted these beliefs. This change in attitude came about as the result of writings by a group know as the ‘philisophes’. The philisophes were intelligent, reasonable men who felt there was much about life in Europe that was unfair and unjust. Since most philosophes were from France and since France was ruled by an absolute monarchy surrounded by a privileged nobility, the French way of life came under particular attack. The chart which follows lists four leading thinkers of the 1700’s. They published writings during a perid called the Age of Reason, or Enlightenment. Many ideas from the Enlightenment were eventually adopted by countries in Europe and around the world. Ideas even spread to the United States and are today a part of our way of life. Read each statement by the philisophes given on the chart and decide whether the statement is a true description of present American life. If it is true of the United States today, fill in the space with yes. If the ideas or attitude is not true of present life in the U.S., put no in the space. 

The philisophes were intelligent, reasonable men who felt there was much about life in Europe that was unfair and unjust. Since most philosophes were from France and since France was ruled by an absolute monarchy surrounded by a privileged nobility, the French way of life came under particular attack. The chart which follows lists four leading thinkers of the 1700’s. They published writings during a perid called the Age of Reason, or Enlightenment. Many ideas from the Enlightenment were eventually adopted by countries in Europe and around the world. Ideas even spread to the United States and are today a part of our way of life. Read each statement by the philisophes given on the chart and decide whether the statement is a true description of present American life. If it is true of the United States today, fill in the space with yes. If the ideas or attitude is not true of present life in the U.S., put no in the space. 

John Locke 1. All men are free and equal at birth. 2. Everyone has the right to life liberty, & property. 3. Citizens have the right to overthrow the government when their natural rights are violated. 4. Rulers receive the right to govern from the people and unfair rulers can be forced from power. 5. Man is not born to be a good or evil person – he is made one way or other by his life experiences and society around him. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ Baron de Montesquieu 1. An absolute ruler in an  Baron de Montesquieu 1. An absolute ruler in an undesirable leader because one-man rule limits basic freedoms such as speech, press, and religion. 2. There should be a ‘separation of powers’ in government between legislative, executive and judicial. 3. Slavery, torture, religious persecution, and censorship are all wrong. 4. A man is innocent until proven guilty. 5. When one country increases its military power, so do other countries; therefore all nations should limit their military strength in order to reduce the chances of war. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______   

Voltaire 1. A man should not be persecuted because of his religious beliefs. 2. Religious myths and ceremonies do nothing to make men better and should therefore be ignored. 3. Clergymen are more interested in increasing the power of the Church that they are in making man better. 4. A scientist is a greater person then a conquering general. 5. All men should be treated as equals and should have freedom of the speech and of the press. 6. Democracy is not a good form of government because the common people are not capable of governing themselves; the best government is one headed by a good and fair king. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ 6. _______ 

Rousseau 1. It is unfair that some people are rich while other people are poor. 2. The rich should not enjoy special privileges. 3. Compared to man during the Stone Age, modern man is unhappy, insecure, and greedy. 4. Social and political reforms must be made before man can be a good person. 5. Democracy is a good form of government. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ 

QUESTIONS: 1. In the philosophes were alive today, do you think they would be generally satisfied or dissatisfied with social conditions and the type of government we have today. EXPLAIN! _______________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ 2. Which three statements by the philosophes do you believe are of the greatest importance to mankind? a. ___________________________________________________________________ b. ___________________________________________________________________ c. ___________________________________________________________________

 

  3. Choose one of the statements and tell why you disagree with it. a. Statement: __________________________________________________________ b. Reason for disagreement ________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 4. Not all the philosophes held the same beliefs, but most agreed that: a. Reason should be used at all times b. The search for new knowledge and ideas should continue c. Improvements must be made in the system of justice to end unfair jail sentences, the torture of prisoners, and terrible conditions in prisons. d. Slavery and warfare should be done away with e. Freedom of religion, speech and press must be given to all f. Everyone should enjoy liberty and equality. g. There should be public education for all, not just schools for children of the wealthy.  

Contact Bill Nobles

Cell Phone:
918-931-1905