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Name:

Bill Nobles

HS History/Girls Basketball Coach

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Contact Info:

Cell Phone:

918-931-1905

About Me

Degrees and Certifications:

B.A. in History, University of Oklahoma

 

Bill Nobles Lesson Plans World History

Lesson Plans 05/07 to 05/11

Objectives

World History Monday and Tuesday       Regional Conflict

Students will

  • research the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and
  • answer questions from textbook on Israeli or a Palestinian issues.

Materials

 

  • Print resources about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
  • Paper, pens

Procedures

  1. Discuss the background of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict featured in the video. These questions will help focus the discussion:
    • Who is involved in this conflict?
    • What region is at the heart of the conflict? Describe the claim that both groups have on this region.
    • What is Israel? When was it founded and by whom?
    • What is the Zionist Movement?
    • Describe the role of the U.S. in the establishment of Israel, a Jewish state.
    • How did the Holocaust affect the formation of a Jewish homeland?
    • What is the PLO? Whom does it represent?
    • Which nations are opposed to a Jewish state? (Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and Egypt)
    • What was the intifada? Who was involved and what caused it?
    • What caused the rise of militant Islam? What is its link to modern terrorism?
    • What is Hamas
  1. After students have completed their research, have them write a personal account, such as a letter or journal entry, from the point of view of an Israeli or Palestinian student. The accounts can be written in the present day or in the past, but they must reflect a major event in the history of the conflict and they should include several details based on research. Challenge students to consider how it must feel to live in the midst of such a conflict.
  2. Have students work in pairs to critique each other's work. Was the account believable? Was it clear when and by whom it was supposed to be written? Did the account include relevant facts based on research? Did it reflect how a young person might feel living in the midst of conflict? Students should revise their writing based on the critique.
  3. Collect the accounts and make copies for everyone in the class. As a homework assignment, have students read the accounts and come prepared to discuss them the next day.

To conclude the lesson, lead a discussion about the accounts. How did students imagine it would feel to be involved in such a conflict? Did they imagine differences between Palestinian and Israeli students? How might their experiences be similar? What was most challenging about writing this assignment? Do students think it is difficult for most Americans to understand the emotions behind the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? Why or why not?

World History Wednesday through Friday

Regional Conflict continued

Background on the Conflict Over KashmiThe Problem: Both India and Pakistan wish to control Kashmir.

Why do both India and Pakistan believe control of Kashmir is so important? The people of Kashmir are still tribal in nature. The geography is mostly rural, with fierce mountains, deserts, and valleys. Industry is undeveloped. If this region has natural resources such as oil or gold or silver in any quantity, this has not yet been discovered. Why the fuss

Background on the Conflict Over KashmirThe Problem: Both India and Pakistan wish to control Kashmir.Why do both India and Pakistan believe control of Kashmir is so important? The people of Kashmir are still tribal in nature. The geography is mostly rural, with fierce mountains, deserts, and valleys. Industry is undeveloped. If this region has natural resources such as oil or gold or silver in any quantity, this has not yet been discovered. Why the fuss?

  1. Control of the Indus River. The headwaters of the Indus River are located in Kashmir. Whomever controls the headwaters, controls the river. The Indus is vital. It brings green fertile life wherever it flows. The Indus begins in Kashmir, then flows through Pakistan, then flows into mainland India. If India chose, since Kashmir is part of India, they could dam the Indus and change the flow of the river. Without fertile land to grow crops, Pakistan would become a desert and its people would starve. Pakistan does not trust India, nor does India trust Pakistan. They will not share control of the Indus. They both want total control.

  2. Religious Sites. Both Pakistan and India have sites in Kashmir that are important to their respective religions.
    * Pakistan is predominately Muslim. Kashmir is predominately Muslim.
    * India is predominately Hindu.

  3. Strategic Location. For India, Kashmir acts as a buffer. For Pakistan, Kashmir offers a fertile roadway into India for possible invasion.

 

Who controls Kashmir today, and why? Approximately sixty years ago, Kashmir was offered a choice by the UN of becoming part of India, part of Pakistan, or becoming independent. To secure Kashmir for Pakistan, in what Muslim forces perceived to be a holy war, Pakistan invaded Kashmir. The ruler of Kashmir fled to India and agreed to place Kashmir under Indian rule if India would protect Kashmir from invasion. If there had been a vote in Kashmir, a vote by the people, the majority probably would have voted to become part of Pakistan for religious reasons. Since there was no vote, Pakistan has never accepted India's control of Kashmir. Pakistan believed then and still believes today that Kashmir should be part of Pakistan. However, for many years now, Kashmir has been part of India, just as Hawaii and California and Alaska are part of the United States.

The people of Kashmir have the same rights as any citizen in India. They have excellent schools. They have television. They have computer access just like the rest of India. Kashmir is predominately Muslim. Muslims only believe in Islamic learnings. Thus, although the people of Kashmir do not always use the benefits available to them, they are available.

 

War & Terrorism: Both India and Pakistan are convinced that they are right and that they will prevail if they continue their fight as they are doing, although this plan has not worked in six decades. In the past 60 years, Pakistan and India have fought three wars over ownership of Kashmir. India won all three. Today, the fight continues with acts of terrorism. The people of Kashmir are probably wondering why the UN won't help them and why the US won't help them. Why must they live with war and terror and what can be done?

Why doesn't the US lend a helping hand with the Kashmir conflict? The US wants to be friends with both Pakistan and India. That makes US involvement in this problem very difficult. On one hand, we have a treaty with Pakistan that says if they go to war with anyone, we will help them. We will honor that treaty. Pakistan shares a border with Afganistan. In our fight on terrorism, that border is most important, and Pakistan's help is critical. On the other hand, we don't want India mad at us. We do a great deal of trade with India that is mutually advantageous. But mostly, India is our friend. If Pakistan goes to war with India, we would have a really tough time with that. So, we try very hard not to get involved. We couldn't win.

When your students come up with any or all of the following solutions, here are some roadblocks you can use.

  • Student Suggestion: Maybe Pakistan could buy Kashmir.
    Teacher Response: It's not about money, although perhaps it's about something money could buy - food. India has the 2nd largest population in the world. They are very crowded. Kashmir has fertile valleys that could produce a lot of food. At the moment they're not producing a lot of food, but they could. India's planners see this potential and want it to feed their population. India is not about to sell or to give away Kashmir. They need it.

  • Student Suggestion: Maybe all the Muslims could move to Pakistan or the Hindus and Sikhs could move to mainland India.
    Teacher Response: People don't want to give up the homes they have lived in for thousands of years. Their life is there. If you try to make them move, you'll start a rein of terror instead of ending one.

  • Student Suggestion: How about a shared government?
    Teacher Response: Pakistan, of course, wants to protect their country and their people. But India refuses to share control of the Indus or of Kashmir.

  • Student Suggestion: How about an Independent Kashmir? Or better yet, let the people decide.
    Teacher Response: Great. Let's ask the people of Kashmir what they want. (Teacher represents the people of Kashmir.) You would probably start a civil war, whatever the outcome of the vote. And if the US helped to set up a vote, the US would risk insulting our good friend India and our good friend Pakistan, which is something the US is not eager to do. But it's a mute point. India is not about to give up Kashmir.

At this point, your students will probably be pretty much convinced that the problem is India. India is not willing to share, thus they are the culprit. When your students say so, which they will, then bring up examples of what the US government has and would do in similar situations in the US.

  • Say: The US fought a Civil War (Northern War of Aggression, War Between the States) when the south wanted to set up their own country. The south had the food. The north had the industry. You need both to be strong. The US did not allow the south to leave, just as India will not allow Kashmir to leave.

  • Ask: What if Canada announced that they wanted Alaska to be part of Canada because they wanted to control the oil Alaska produces? Would the US say - look at the geography. That's so sensible. (No way.)

  • Ask: What if the residents of San Diego, a major seaport in California, voted to become part of Mexico by an overwhelming 80% majority? Would the US government say okay? (No way.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Monday

Issues of Our Time

Objectives

l Students will examine the debate on the size of government using the question of the extent of the government’s involvement in education.

Overview/Materials Pacing

Standard

Block

 

Take a Poll

Description

Ask: What level of government should be responsible for the quality of your education?

(a) federal (b) State (c) local (d) none of these

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Summarize the Issue

Description

Have students read the feature and summarize the issue and the views

expressed in the quotes. L2 ELL Differentiate Write these terms and

definitions on the board: accountable ( responsible), curriculum (the course of study in a school), mandate (an order or command), accessible (that can be approached).

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Description

Since the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002, there has been continuing debate on the program’s value. Display Transparency 15H, No Child Left Behind. Supporters claim that it makes schools accountable for the quality of their education, while critics state that it promotes lower achievement goals. The program has also revived the debate on whether the Federal

Government is interfering in a realm that should be a State and local responsibility.

Ask: Should the Federal Government control the quality of our education system?

(yes: because education affects the nation’s competitive edge; no: because federal funding to states should not be tied to students’ test results) Does this program overstep the scope of National Government? (Answers will vary.) Then take another poll using the question at the beginning of the lesson. If students have changed their

stance, ask why.

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

 

Assessments-Formative

Informal assessment through discussion questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Tuesday

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Wednesday

Issues of Our Time

Objectives

l Students will examine the debate on the size of government using the question of the extent of the government’s involvement in education.

Take a Poll

Description

Ask: What level of government should be responsible for the quality of your education?

(a) federal (b) State (c) local (d) none of these

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Summarize the Issue

Description

Have students read the feature and summarize the issue and the views

expressed in the quotes. L2 ELL Differentiate Write these terms and

definitions on the board: accountable ( responsible), curriculum (the course of study in a school), mandate (an order or command), accessible (that can be approached).

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Description

Since the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002, there has been continuing debate on the program’s value. Display Transparency 15H, No Child Left Behind. Supporters claim that it makes schools accountable for the quality of their education, while critics state that it promotes lower achievement goals. The program has also revived the debate on whether the Federal

Government is interfering in a realm that should be a State and local responsibility.

Ask: Should the Federal Government control the quality of our education system?

(yes: because education affects the nation’s competitive edge; no: because federal funding to states should not be tied to students’ test results) Does this program overstep the scope of National Government? (Answers will vary.) Then take another poll using the question at the beginning of the lesson. If students have changed their stance, ask why.

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

 

Assessments-Formative

Informal assessment through discussion questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Thursday

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Friday

Issues of Our Time

Objectives

l Students will examine the debate on the size of government using the question of the extent of the government’s involvement in education

Take a Poll

Description

Ask: What level of government should be responsible for the quality of your education?

(a) federal (b) State (c) local (d) none of these

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Summarize the Issue

Description

Have students read the feature and summarize the issue and the views

expressed in the quotes. L2 ELL Differentiate Write these terms and

definitions on the board: accountable ( responsible), curriculum (the course of study in a school), mandate (an order or command), accessible (that can be approached).

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Description

Since the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002, there has been continuing debate on the program’s value. Display Transparency 15H, No Child Left Behind. Supporters claim that it makes schools accountable for the quality of their education, while critics state that it promotes lower achievement goals. The program has also revived the debate on whether the Federal

Government is interfering in a realm that should be a State and local responsibility.

Ask: Should the Federal Government control the quality of our education system?

(yes: because education affects the nation’s competitive edge; no: because federal funding to states should not be tied to students’ test results) Does this program overstep the scope of National Government? (Answers will vary.) Then take another poll using the question at the beginning of the lesson. If students have changed their

stance, ask why.

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Assessments-Formative

Informal assessment through discussion questions.

 

 

 

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plans W. Hist and Gov't 4/30 to 5/04

Lesson Plans W. History

Monday

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Tuesday

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Wednesday-Friday

\Defining The term Poor in  a global context

  • entrepreneurship
  • rule of law
  • incentives
  • property rights
  • limited government

NATIONAL VOLUNTARY CONTENT STANDARDS IN ECONOMICSThe background materials and student activities in lesson 1, part 2 address parts of the following national voluntary content standards and benchmarks in economics. Students will learn that:

Standard 4: People respond predictably to positive and negative incentives.

  • Acting as consumers, producers, workers, savers, investors, and citizens, people respond to incentives in order to allocate their scarce resources in ways that provide the highest possible returns to them.

Standard 10: Institutions evolve in market economies to help individuals and groups accomplish their goals. Banks, labor unions, corporations, legal systems, and not-for-profit organizations are examples of important institutions. A different kind of institution, clearly defined and well-enforced property rights, is essential to a market economy.

  • Property rights, contract enforcement, standards for weights and measures, and liability rules affect incentives for people to produce and exchange goods and services.

INTRODUCTION AND LESSON THEME

The prevailing image of a “capitalist” may be an American businessman, but a survey of the world’s economies reveals that, like poverty, capitalism has many faces. “Capitalist” is used, in either praise or condemnation, to label many nations, and the label is claimed –whether deservedly or not – by many more. To begin a systematic analysis of whether capitalism is good for the poor requires a working agreement on just exactly what capitalism is.

In the last half of the 20th century, courses in “comparative systems” were found in many universities, and high school textbooks routinely had chapters bearing that title. The content typically consisted of comparing and contrasting capitalism, communism, socialism, and, occasionally, fascism, each of which was conceived of as a discrete entity or “system.” Unfortunately, the usefulness of the paradigm decayed in the face of the persistence with which actual economies crossed the lines between systems.

For example, the standard textbook definition of capitalism as “a market economy in which the means of production are privately owned,” raises more questions than it answers:

  • Must ALL production be private?
  • Is the United States truly a capitalist economy when mass transit services in most cities are publicly funded, and 1st-class mail is delivered by the federal government?
  • How could the Soviet Union have been considered truly “communist,” when peasant farmers were allowed to sell their garden produce in open markets?

Additionally, the traditional conception of “systems” was unwieldy because it incorporated the political and governmental characteristics of nations, often without specifically addressing how those characteristics altered economic institutions.

Using an institutional definition of capitalism allows us to avoid the problems of a one-size-fits-all definition. Using the framework of institutional economics, developed by Nobel laureate and economic historian, Douglass North, allows us to identify specific institutional components of capitalism and to analyze their characteristics in particular times and places.

We begin, therefore, by asserting that capitalist economies share an identifying set of institutions, whose different manifestations in practice have a similar foundation. While it may take some careful looking to see the similarities underneath the striking differences between such places as China and the Netherlands, the United States and Uganda, or India and Argentina, these similarities do exist.

The hallmark of capitalism is the existence of a particular set of institutions governing the production and exchange of goods and services. Elements of capitalism are found in almost all nations, but the forms and degrees of capitalism vary widely.

As in part 1, the purpose of this background outline is to set the stage for the investigation by creating a common vocabulary to facilitate future discussion of poverty and capitalism.

KEY POINTS

  1. Overview: In addition to U.S. capitalism, other current and recent forms include:
    • Chinese (communist) capitalism
    • western European capitalism
    • former-Soviet republics capitalism
    • African (dictator-based) capitalism
    • The different forms share similarities and manifest significant differences.
      • Capitalist economies share a set of key institutions. However, the characteristics of the shared institutions vary greatly from one capitalist country to the next
      • In their differences lies the explanation for their differing levels of success in reducing poverty.
  2. Key terms and concepts:
    • Institutions are the established behavior practices and patterns upon which the life of a community is built. Nobel laureate and economic historian Douglass North calls them “the rules of the game.” They are fixtures of people’s interactions with one another.
      • Formal institutions, like constitutions and statutory law, codify the rules under which the members of the economy interact.
      • Informal institutions and expectations of behavior are at least as important as formal institutions.
        • Doug North argues, in fact, that informal institutions may exert even more influence over behavior than formal laws. Laws may have little ability to shape behavior if they do not match up with informal but ingrained cultural and social norms.
        • Additionally, while formal laws may be changed at any time, informal institutional arrangements tend to be persistent and change very slowly.
    • Institutions influence behavior by shaping incentives.
    • Incentives are rewards and punishments for behavior.
    • Economists have long recognized that people react to incentives in predictable ways. Incentives, rather than nebulous forces like “national character,” explain observable patterns of economic decision-making.
      • North argued, by way of illustration, that if a nation’s institutions rewarded piracy, for example, then its people would face incentives to become pirates – and would do so in greater numbers than in nations without such incentives, regardless of their cultural background.
      • He also argued that institutions are not neutral: that different institutional forms may give advantages to different groups. Because that is the case, the “players” in the economy realize that changing the rules can give them an advantage, and thus they will devote resources to effect those changes.
        • Organizations such as political parties, companies, trade unions, and bureaucracies want to survive and benefit in a given institutional setting, so they will invest in trying to change the rules to increase the benefits they receive from the system. (Grossman)
        • In this sense, we must recognize that economic institutions are not immune to politics. Although Is Capitalism Good for the Poor?concentrates on the functioning of economic institutions, it is important to remember that economic institutions do not operate independently and that they are always constrained, to a greater or lesser degree, by political and governmental institutions.
  3. The common set of institutions shared by capitalist economies is:
    1. markets – institutions governing voluntary exchange;
    2. entrepreneurship – institutions governing risks and rewards of organizing resources for production;
    3. property rights – institutions governing the ownership, use and transfer of private property; and
    4. the rule of law – the extent and limits of authority and privilege.
    • The characteristics of these institutions vary greatly from country to country.
      • The result is a broad spectrum of “capitalist” practices, some empowering the poor, and some holding them back.
  4. Analogy: Institutions are the threads in a nation’s “social fabric.”
    • Like cloth fabrics, a social fabric is constructed of interwoven threads. Cloth threads are cotton, linen, wool, or synthetics; the threads from which a “social fabric” is woven are institutions.
    • This analogy also helps us to explain the variety in capitalist economies. Consider that even cloth fabrics made from only one type of thread may look and feel different. Cotton thread may be spun in different ways – bulky, thin, smooth, or rough – and the resulting cloth has a distinctive look and feel.
      • Similarly, any single capitalist institution (markets, private property, rule of law, or entrepreneurship) may take on various forms, depending on factors such as the culture, government, and history of the nation.
        • Markets, for example, differ in the extent of regulation and openness.
          • At one end of the spectrum are Hong Kong’s virtually unregulated markets, which provide almost all goods and services.
          • In Western Europe, markets provide most products, but the government provides health care, and many forms of communication and transportation.
          • At the other end of the spectrum, China’s markets provide few products; they are restricted to agriculture and a few government-selected manufactured goods.
  5. The historical record shows that the success with which a capitalist economy deals with poverty depends on the institutional forms it adopts. Some forms of capitalism have successfully generated the economic progress that alleviates poverty. Others have failed to do so.
    • In successful capitalist nations, the institutional threads have the following distinctive characteristics:
      1. Property rights are clearly defined and secured.
        • The definition of property rights includes individuals’ rights to self (labor) and possessions
      2. The rule of law prevails within a framework of limited government
        • Note that just having democratic political institutions is notsufficient to satisfy this requirement.
      3. Markets are open and competitive.
        • Competitive interaction creates an ethic in which individuals’ choices have consequences.
      4. Entrepreneurship is fostered by incentives to invent, innovate and produce.

CONCLUSION

The student activity “Will the Real Capitalism Please Stand Up?” is a small-group discussion exercise to familiarize students with the range of capitalist economies, and to give them practice in identifying the institutions – markets, entrepreneurship, property rights, and rule of law – that form the foundation of capitalism.

The next 4 lessons in Is Capitalism Good for the Poor? investigate the operation of the distinctive capitalist institutions found in nations experiencing economic growth:

  • Lesson 2: Property Rights and the Rule of Law
  • Lesson 3: Beneficiaries of Competition
  • Lesson 4: How Incentives Affect Innovation
  • Lesson 5: Character Values and Capitalism.

Together, the lessons teach students to use the tools of economic reasoning to evaluate the relationship between capitalism and poverty. The lessons address the prevailing belief that capitalism oppresses the poor and reserves its benefits for the rich. They provide the data and analytical tools for students and teachers to draw their own conclusions and to answer for themselves the question, Is Capitalism Good for the Poor?

 

 

Lesson Plans    Government

Economic Systems

traditional, market, command, and mixed economies

 

 

Grade Level and Course:

10th Grade  Government – 48 minute class periods

 

District Standards:

Analyze and compare traditional, market, command, and mixed economies as organizing systems for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. (OK 4.1.1)

 

NCSS and/or Common Core Standards:

NCSS VII. PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND CONSUMPTION

Have learners compare basic economic systems according to how they deal with demand, supply, prices, the role of government, banks, labor and labor unions, savings and investments, and capital;

 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.

 

Essential Question:

What are the different kinds of economic systems?

 

Learning Objectives:

            Substantive: Students will/will be able to…

  •  Identify aspects of market systems and categorize elements of each system

 

            Disciplinary & Language-focused: Students will/will be able to…

  •   Define traditional, market, command, and mixed economies

           

Informal & Formal Assessment:

Substantive – Formal – Descriptions of Economic Systems worksheet

Informal – Verbal check for understanding.  Students should be able to properly categorize the type of economy presented in the “Cave-o-nomics” short film.

 

Language focused – Informal – verbal check for appropriate use of vocabulary terms

 

Resources & Materials:  

 

Instructional Activities/Learning Tasks:

 

Warm-Up

  • Students will be asked to guess what the relationship between the following words: traditional, market, command, and mixed (2 min)

Main Instructional Activities/Learning Tasks

  • Students will view and take notes on PowerPoint lecture describing different kinds of economies and their elements. (20 min)
  • Students will read descriptions of different fictional country’s economies and will sort each economy by category. (15 min)

 

Closure

  • Students will view a short film “Cave-o-nomics” and will be asked to identify what type of economy is being portrayed in the film. (7 min)

 

Modifications/Differentiation:

  • Students in inclusion classrooms will have the teacher read aloud the country’s description and will work together as a large group to identify what kind of economy the country belongs to.
  • Students with IEPs will be provided with a partially completed note-taker and will fill in the blanks as we go through lecture.
Lesson Plans Govt and W. Hist. 4/23 to 4/27

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Haskell High School

4-23-18 to 4-27-18

 

Date: Monday and Tuesday

 

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

     

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Haskell High School

4-23-18 to 4-27-18

 

Date: Wednesday-Friday

 

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

     

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.

 

World History

Bill Nobles

Haskell High School

4-23-18 to 4-27-18

Monday

Students will read the following handout

The War is Finished

This chapter tells the story of the collapse of the South Vietnamese army and government. It raises

the question whether the U.S. deserted its ally at the end of a noble, if unsuccessful, effort or if it

simply had made a serious mistake from the beginning.

Readers will remember that the final peace agreement signed on January 27, 1973, allowed

President Thieu and his government to remain in power during the U.S. withdrawal. The treaty also

allowed the North Vietnamese to stay in South Vietnam, and called for an election to unite North and

South Vietnam. The election would be supervised by a 'National Council of Reconciliation', and not the

present government of South Vietnam. This Council was to be set up 'immediately after the cease-fire.'

North Vietnamese government officials were prepared to use the election to take control of South

Vietnam. They gave orders for their followers in the south to prepare for a political campaign. If they did

not win, of course, North Vietnam still had a 145,000-man army in South Vietnam.

President Thieu, however, never planned to allow a communist take over of South Vietnam by way

of an election. "If we allow the communists to operate," he said, "we will lose control of the country." That

explains his order to his police the day after he signed the Paris Peace Accord, to kill Vietnamese "who

suddenly begin taking a communist tone."

Violations of the Cease Fire

As it turned out, both sides cheated on the peace agreement before it even went into effect. Shortly

after he accepted the in-place cease-fire, Henry Kissinger telegraphed Thieu to take more territory from

the Vietcong. The day before the agreement was signed, the Vietcong took over some 300 villages

controlled by South Vietnam. On the first day of the peace agreement the South Vietnamese government

started attacking these villages to drive the Vietcong out.

From the winter of 1973 to the spring of 1975, the South Vietnamese government more or less

followed the orders given by President Thieu. Communists were arrested and put in jail. No steps were

taken to form the National Council of Reconciliation that was supposed to prepare for an election. And no

elections were held.

Corruption in South Vietnam

According to an old Vietnamese expression, 'a house leaks from the top.' President Thieu promoted

military officers based on their loyalty to him, and not their ability and performance as soldiers. He did

nothing to stop the corruption in his government. Thieu' s wife and her friends made millions of US

dollars buying and selling real estate in Saigon. They made their purchases based on what they knew the

government wanted to buy. Generals kept the money that was supposed to pay their soldiers. Army

officers sold weapons and ammunition to the Vietcong. Soldiers who were supposed to deliver military

supplies to the ARVN sold them on the black market. People who criticized the government were

arrested and thrown in jail. At the very bottom of this chain of corruption, the South Vietnamese soldier

did not have enough money to feed his family. Poorly motivated, led, trained, and fed, when the time

came, he was not prepared to fight.

Stage 3 of Guerrilla War

The South Vietnamese had failed to take the first steps that were supposed to lead to the Council of

National Reconciliation that would run free and democratic elections. The North Vietnamese

subsequently prepared for their final military campaign. After years of guerrilla warfare, North Vietnam

was prepared for Stage 3 — large unit attacks. The famous Ho Chi Minh trail, that for years had been

used to infiltrate men and supplies into South Vietnam, was a narrow jungle trail under protective

covering of trees. North Vietnam converted the trail into an all-weather highway. It stretched from North

Vietnam, through Laos and Cambodia and into the Mekong delta, south of Saigon. With its various

feeder roads, it covered 12,000 miles. A 3,000-mile long pipeline was built to supply needed gas for the

North Vietnamese army. The road even had rest, service and repair stations. Anti-aircraft guns guarded

the roadway. Trucks, tanks and armed cars drove south down these roads. The Vietnamese had come a

long way from their guerrilla war days, and when the time came, they would be ready to strike.

Stage 3 of guerrilla warfare, full army attacks, began on March 10, 1975. First the South Vietnamese

Air Force was chased off by Russian anti-aircraft guns. Then North Vietnamese tanks poured in to their

first targeted town, Banmethout. Suddenly confronted by Russian tanks and a well-armed enemy, South

Vietnamese troops panicked and fled.

President Thieu decided to give up all of his positions near the North Vietnam border to

concentrate his troops in the southern region around Saigon. Then he changed his mind and ordered a

defense of the North. But the army general defending Pleiku fled by plane, leaving his soldiers and their

families to escape on their own. Before long some 200,000 leaderless men, women, and children were

fleeing toward Danang on the coast. But Danang itself was under attack. Soon, the South Vietnamese

army had turned into a terrorized mob of fleeing men. They used their weapons, if at all, to shoot

civilians in their path. Reaching the water's edge:

the soldiers went down to the beach, where some threw away their weapons and their uniforms

and dived into the sea to swim out to waiting American ships, while others commandeered boats

and then began firing at one another on the open water. Soon the scenes in Danang were repeated

in cities through most of South Vietnam. In one city, the soldiers were shooting at the owners of

the restaurants where they ate. Something deeper than the collapse of an army's discipline was

taking place. It was the disintegration of a society that had been pulverized by war and corrupted

by foreign invaders for thirty years. A society that had lost all sense of self-respect and that

despised itself for its subservience to one foreign master after another — a society that had been

turned into a literal brothel for millions of soldiers from foreign countries — was tearing itself

apart in a fury of self-destruction.23

Similar scenes were taking place in other cities. Thieu's million-man army equipped with excellent

American weapons simply self-destructed seeking some kind of safety, somewhere other than in

Vietnam.

The Last Days of Saigon

This spreading panic threatened Saigon as that city prepared to defend itself. Gerald Ford, formerly

Nixon’s vice-President, became commander in chief in 1974 after Richard Nixon resigned because of his

23 The New Yorker, (April 14, 1975), pp. 27-28.

involvement in the cover up of a break-in of the Democratic Party headquarters in Watergate. President

Ford and his Secretary of State, Henry Kissinger, asked Congress for another $700 million to defend the

rest of South Vietnam. But Congress, by this time tired of the long war, refused. Kissinger, Thieu and

others later blamed the U.S. Congress for the defeat, which followed.

One month after the fall of

Danang the North Vietnamese army

marched into Saigon. As the enemy army

approached the capital, the ARVN

collapsed completely and surrendered

with hardly a fight. With it, billions of

dollars of U.S. equipment fell into the

hands of North Vietnam. Meanwhile

men, women and children tried

desperately to escape the enemy. Fifty

thousand people fled Saigon the week

before the communist forces arrived.

Seven thousand were air lifted by

helicopter to waiting U.S. ships off shore

in the last 18 hours. The million

Vietnamese who had depended on the

U.S. had good reason to fear living under

control of the victorious communist army

after 29 years of brutal warfare.

Although the outcome certainly could not please the U.S., at least the long war was finally over.

Assessment/Formal and Summative

Start discussion centered around topics outlined below. Students will then begin formal assessment.

 Student Exercises:

1. Describe and try to account for the failure of the 1973 peace agreement and the subsequent collapse of

the South Vietnamese government in the Spring of 1975.

2. Do you think that Congress made the right decision not to vote for an additional $700 million to defend

Saigon? Why or why not?

3. Given the final outcome of the war, evaluate U.S. policy in Vietnam - a mistake from the beginning or a

noble, but unsuccessful effort. Explain. (Note: last chapter focuses totally on this question).

 

World History

Bill Nobles

4-16-18 to 4-20-18

Tuesday and Wednesday

Students will review unit exam on the 1960’s and the Vietnam War and then take the examon the following day.

World History

Bill Nobles

Thursday and Friday

 Journey through the United States Domestic and Foreign Policy from 1970 to 199

Performance Expectations:

V. Individuals, Groups, and Institutions

c. describe the various forms institutions take, and explain how they develop and change over time

VI. Power Authority, & Governance

i. evaluate the extent to which governments achieve their stated ideals and policies at home and abroad;

What is the student going to learn and why?

The student will learn about domestic and foreign policy in the United States throughout the 1970s until the fall of the Soviet Union. They will be addressing the challenges and opportunities that exist for the United States as we enter the 21st century as well. These two initiatives address two standards and give the students the opportunity to create an understanding of domestic and foreign policy. The student will be focusing their energy on researching the United States domestic policy as it relates to the ever-changing stance that our government takes on Environmentalism. Their research will begin in the 1970's while they look at the birth of Environmentalism, and it will move chronologically through the next three decades as they look at how different Presidents and different Congresses change our policies concerning the Environment. This is important because it will help to show the students how while we might value the environment during one decade, after a Presidential change, the nation may turn their domestic concerns to other topics. The students will complete this learning objective by creating an interactive timeline and completing a shortened essay in order to tie the information together. From this point, the students will look into the foreign policy and its evolution since the 1970s. Students will be using the information regarding the evolution of foreign policy to then diagnose challenges that the United States may experience, as the 21st century gets under way, and recognize opportunity that exists for the United States as well.

How does this project affect life outside of school?

The student researches the nation's past, recent, and future policy decisions. The student will begin to recognize patterns in policy and notice that much of their life today is influenced by the

decisions made regarding domestic or foreign US policy. As the students are listening to the news after completing this project, it may result in a better understanding of current events. By this point, many high school students have also formulated opinions regarding the environment, and the United States' foreign involvement. Upon completion of this project, students are granted the opportunity to formulate more authoritative, educated opinions regarding the two topics.

What makes this project important to the community or the world around the student?

When individuals are more aware of the political world around them, they are more active citizens and participants in their community. If we as educators are working to develop global citizens and participants, we must provide an opportunity for the student to understand the United States position of policy both historically and currently as well as domestic and foreign.

Questions that the student will be able to answer by doing this project:

- How did domestic policy evolved through the 20 years in question?

- How did foreign policy evolved throughout the 20 years in question?

- In the future, what challenges does United States policy face?

- In the future, what opportunities does the United States policy have for positive change?

Tasks and activities:

Part A: PowerPoint Presentation

- The history of domestic policy slide show:

The PowerPoint will guide the students through the past 40 years and the domestic policy regarding the environment. They will need to create 1-2 slides per decade and explain important policy changes that occurred during that time period. (see student handout attached for further details)

o Time necessary to complete: 120 minutes

Part B: Essay

- Domestic policy essay

The essay will consist of an introduction paragraph, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph. The essay will be spiraling through the slideshow information. They will need to explain how the domestic policy regarding the environment has evolved throughout the last 40 years to begin the essay. They will then

continue to outline the challenges that the United States faces with its environmental policies in the near future. To complete the essay they will synthesize what they believe are opportunities for betterment that the United States has in their near future.(see student handout for further details)

o Time necessary to complete: 45 minutes

Part C: Essay

- Foreign policy essay

This final essay will be three sections. The first section will be explaining foreign policy in each decade. The second section will begin by explaining the evolution of foreign policy through the four decades and end discussing the current foreign policies that the United States is working with. The third section is similar to the essay on domestic policy and they will once again be using three challenges and three opportunities. To conclude the essay, they will choose one of the selected quotes and explain what they believe is better plan for future United States foreign policy. (see student handout for further details)

o Time necessary to complete: 120 minutes

Assessment-Formative

Essay

Lesson Plans 3/12 to 3/15

World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 3/12 to Thursday 3/15

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page.World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 2/20 to Friday 2/23

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page.

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Monday, Mar. 12

 

Description

This lesson will analyze how the two party system has affected American history.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Understand the origins of political parties in the United States.
  2. Identify and describe the three periods of single party domination and describe the current era of divided government.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the Venn graphic organizer in the text, p. 94-102.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

 

2. Bellringer: Students will view the two party symbols in a Thomas Nast Political cartoon and write down the qualities associated with these animals. Discussion will be based on these and what students believe Nast’s purpose was using these two principals.

3. Introduce topic: Analyzing political parties through political cartoons.

4. Students will read Ch. 5 Section 2 and complete the political cartoon worksheet.

5. Students will discuss the last question on the worksheet on the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 might affect party balance and how events such as new technology, major historical events and cultural change can affect attitudes about political parties.

 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the political party worksheet.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Tuesday, Mar. 13

 

Description

This lesson is designed to suffrage rights, voting requirements, and the historical relationship between voting and Civil Rights.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

            7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under

the law.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Examine the reasons for expansion of voting rights.

2. Analyze how voting qualification have changed over time.

3. Identify historical barriers and voter discrimination trends that have affected African-Americans historically.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Organize the class into three groups and assign each group a section from the chapter.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students groups will create a presentation detailing the main points of the section.

3. As the groups give their presentations they will create a study guide on the Smart Board outlining each section’s main points.

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on class presentations

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Wednesday, Mar. 14

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Thursday, Mar.. 15

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 16

 

Description

This lesson the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will complete required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the exam

World History and Government Lesson Plans 2/20 to 2/23

World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 2/20 to Friday 2/23

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page. 

 

 

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 20

 

Description

This lesson will analyze how the two party system has affected American history.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Understand the origins of political parties in the United States.
  2. Identify and describe the three periods of single party domination and describe the current era of divided government.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the Venn graphic organizer in the text, p. 94-102.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

 

2. Bellringer: Students will view the two party symbols in a Thomas Nast Political cartoon and write down the qualities associated with these animals. Discussion will be based on these and what students believe Nast’s purpose was using these two principals.

3. Introduce topic: Analyzing political parties through political cartoons.

4. Students will read Ch. 5 Section 2 and complete the political cartoon worksheet.

5. Students will discuss the last question on the worksheet on the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 might affect party balance and how events such as new technology, major historical events and cultural change can affect attitudes about political parties.

 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the political party worksheet.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 21

 

Description

This lesson is designed to suffrage rights, voting requirements, and the historical relationship between voting and Civil Rights.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

            7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under

the law.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Examine the reasons for expansion of voting rights.

2. Analyze how voting qualification have changed over time.

3. Identify historical barriers and voter discrimination trends that have affected African-Americans historically.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Organize the class into three groups and assign each group a section from the chapter.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students groups will create a presentation detailing the main points of the section.

3. As the groups give their presentations they will create a study guide on the Smart Board outlining each section’s main points.

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on class presentations

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Noble

Thursday, Feb. 23

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 23

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 16

 

Description

This lesson the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will complete required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the exam

World History and Government Lesson Plans 2/06 to 2/09

ThLesson Plans 4/12-4/15

World History The Cold War
Origins

After working together to defeat the Axis Powers in Europe and in the Pacific, relations between the Soviet Union and its western Allies quickly soured. The first cracks in the relationship appeared before the war ended at the Potsdam Conference, where Allied leaders found common ground on the future of Germany but clashed over Soviet demands for friendly "buffer" states between it and its enemy in two devastating world wars. This hairline fracture soon became a gaping chasm as East and West sought to shore up allies, first in Europe and then in Asia, Africa and Latin America. It was, in fact, in the Third World, which was emerging from centuries of European domination, that the Cold War became "hot." Unwilling to risk the nuclear Armageddon that a direct conflict would surely bring, the superpowers instead focused their military efforts on establishing friendly states around the globe. So while the poles of the Cold War were centered in the US and Soviet Union, the magnetic field of the conflict encompassed the entire world. It is this global nature of the conflict that provides the context for the unit's essential question: How did Cold War tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union impact the economic, social and political development of former European colonies in the Third World?

 

 

 

Tuesday and Wednesday

Objectives: 1) Compare and contrast the causes and courses of World Wars I and II; 2) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II; 3) Explain the United States' policy of containment

Class Work: Document-Based Question; paragraph writing; guided reading

 

Thursday

Objectives: 1) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II;

Class Work: Guided note-taking on movie, Atomic Cafe

 

Friday

Objectives: 1) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II; 2) Analyze the role of nuclear weapons in keeping the conflict between the US and USSR "cold"

Class Work: Guided note-taking on movie; Analyze political cartoon

 

Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 6

 

Description

This lesson is designed to examine the formal amendment process for the U.S. Constitution

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 2: The student will describe the historic and philosophical foundations of the United States republican system of government.

            6. Analyze the steps of the constitutional amendment process including examples of recent attempts to amend the United States Constitution as exemplified in the issues of the Equal Rights Amendment and flag desecration.  

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Compare the process of ratification of amendments by studying charts.
  2. Identify the four different ways by which the Constitution may be changed.
  3. Understand that while many amendments have been proposed, only a select group has been ratified.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the graphic organizer in the text, p. 79-83.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Introduction of the topic: the students will be informed that today the class will discuss the formal amendment process. The discussion will center around the following discussion questions; A. What has been the most often used method for ratification and why?  B. How many of the amendments were ratified this way? C. What method was used to ratify the 21st Amendment and why?  D. Describe the other two methods for ratification.  
3. Students will read the section.

4.  Class discussion.

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the class discussion.

 

 

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 7

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how basic legislation has added to our understanding of the Constitution over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the executive and legislative branches have interpreted the Constitution.

3. Analyze the role of party practices and custom in interpreting the Constitution.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will read the section, p. 85-88, then complete the cause and effect chart on p. 85.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will identify and discuss the five methods in which change occurs.

4. Students will hand in their cause and effects charts as an assessment. 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their completion of the graphic organizer on p. 85. This is a two column cause and effect chart that must include separate items for each column.

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Thursday, Feb. 08

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how basic legislation has added to our understanding of the Constitution over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the executive and legislative branches have interpreted the Constitution.

3. Analyze the role of party practices and custom in interpreting the Constitution.

 

 

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will re-read the section, p. 85-88, then finish the cause and effect chart on p. 85.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will identify and discuss the five methods in which change occurs.

4. Students will hand in their cause and effects charts as an assessment. 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their completion of the graphic organizer on p. 85. This is a two column cause and effect chart that must include separate items for each column.

 

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 09

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how federal and state governments interact and share powers over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the Federal and State governments use expressed and implied powers.

 

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will read the section, p. 90-95, then engage in discussion.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will discuss the use of implied and expressed powers at the State and Federal levels.

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their response to discussion questions.

World History and Government Lesson Plans 1/22 to 1/26

World History

World War II

Monday-The Home Front

During World War II African Americans found themselves with conflicting feelings about supporting the war effort when their own country did not offer them the freedom America was fighting for overseas.   The Double Victory - Double V - campaign, begun by the Pittsburgh Courier newspaper in 1942, helped to address this issue.  It encouraged African Americans to participate at every level in winning the war abroad, while simultaneously fighting for their civil rights at home.

Tuesday-Nazism and Fascism

Between 1933 and 1945, Nazi Germany and its collaborators pursued a program to systematically persecute and destroy six million Jews. Nazi ideology identified other enemies; they were targeted for racial, ethnic or political reasons.

During this lesson, high school students will understand the German National Socialism (Nazi) extermination campaign against European Jewry and other targeted groups within the context of World War II history; appraise responses to the Holocaust by governments and individuals; reflect on racism and stereotyping; and reflect on responsibility and remembrance

Wednesday-D Day

General Dwight D. Eisenhower wrote his “order of the day” on D-Day, the Allied invasion of France, which spelled the beginning of the end of the Third Reich and Nazi domination of Europe.  These confident words were given to every person involved in the operation.  However, very few, including Eisenhower himself, had absolute confidence in the mission.  In fact, unknown even to Eisenhower’s inner circle, Ike had already written an announcement the invasion had failed, and that he accepted the blame.

In this lesson, students will investigate the complex aspects of Operation Overlord, including the commanders, geography and history, political, and technological challenges that made this one of the most difficult military operations in history

Thursday and Friday The Pacific War

In this lesson, students will review the historic significance of a controversy involving the Chicago Tribune, which published a series of stories inferring that the US had broken a secret Japanese code, which significantly assisted the US Navy in winning one of the biggest battles of the Pacific Theater of World War II, the Battle of Midway.  Did the Tribune go beyond the First Amendment right of freedom of the press in this instance? 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

1-22-18 to 1-26-18

 

Date: Monday, Tuesday Jan. 22-23

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify and define the basic concepts of democracy.

 

Standards

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

   3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.

   4. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the major ways governmental power is distributed, shared, and structured in unitary, federal, and confederal systems in terms of effectiveness, prevention of abuse of power, and responsiveness to the popular will.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Objectives; Students will-

  1. Identify and explain the five basic concepts of democracy.
  2. Identify real world examples of the five concepts of democracy by brainstorming and completing a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History

2. Bellringer: Students will use a Bellringer worksheet which includes a passage on the Internet and Democracy. Students will read the passage and answer the questions.

3. Students will read Ch. 1 Section 3, pp. 20-24. .

4. Students will complete the graphic organizer on p. 20 and the reading comprehension worksheet handout.

5. Students will share and discuss their answers from the bellringer exercise.
 

 

Assessments-Summative

Students will be assessed through the Understanding of Main Ideas worksheet.

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Wednesday-Friday, 1-24-14 to 1-26-1

 

Description

This lesson is designed to gather required benchmarks and reinforces the previous lesson on the basic concepts of democracy through the use of Jigsaw collaborative learning.

 

Objectives; Students will-

  1. Identify and explain the five basic concepts of democracy.
  2. Identify real world examples of the five concepts of democracy by brainstorming and completing a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

            3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.   

 

Procedures

Quote of the Day and Today in History

  1. Students will be given a short multiple choice test to gather required benchmark data.
  2. The class will be divided into groups and each will be assigned a particular concept of democracy.
  3. Each group will become teaching experts and then will in turn teach the other groups on each concept.

 

Assessment-Formative

Students understanding will be assessed based on a guided discussion on the five concepts of democracy.

World History and Government Lesson Plans 1/16 to 1/19

Class: Periods 2-5                                         Topic:  The Rise of Fascism    

  

 

Tuesday

Political Upheaval in the 1920’s

Instructional Objectives:

Knowledge:

The pupils

  • Students know about the World War 1.
  • Students know about the Triple Alliance.
  • Students know about the Treaty of Versailles

Understanding

The pupils

  • To Understand the Rise of Dictatorship in Italy.
  • To understand the common factors in Italy and Germany, which led to the rise of dictatorship in Italy and Germany?  
  • To understand the cause of the rise of the fascist.                

 Critical Thinking:

The pupils

  • Critically evaluate The rise of Fascism and Nazism and the second world war
  • Critically think about the cause for the rise of Fascism in Italy.

Skill:

The pupils

  • Draw the flow chart on the causes of the rise of fascist dictatorship in Italy.
  • Draw the timeline of the rise of Fascism and its causes.

Teaching Points

 

  1. The rise of dictatorships in Italy.
  2. Mussolini, dictator of Italy brought fascism in Italy.
  3. Fascism and its meaning
  4. Rise of Mussolini.

Map of Political Post war Europe, Picture of prominent leaders, Timeline of rise of Fascism, Diagrammatic Representation.

Tuesday and Wednesday

1924 – THE YEAR THAT MADE HITLER

Objective: To have students analyze, evaluate the rise of Hitler through sourcing and annotating complex text reading. 

Vocabulary: Mein Kampf, Anti-Semitic, High Treason, Nationalistic, Antiparliamentarian, The Blood and The Fist, Swastika, Volkisch

Bellringer-Quotation Interpretation:

“How it happened that Hitler came to power is still the most important question of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century German history, if not all of German history.”

                                                               -Heinrich August Winkler, Historian, 2000

 

How did Hitler come to power?

WARM UP:   Above

 

INTRODUCTION:  Adolf Hitler spent 1924 behind bars, convicted of treason after an unsuccessful coup against the unstable postwar German government.  It was a year of deep reading and intensive writing, or passionate courtroom speeches, of proselytizing to his fellow inmates, and of working feverishly on Mein Kampf.  It was, in many ways, the year that made Hitler an explosively powerful political force.  Everything that would come – the rallies and riots, the single-minded deployment of a catastrophically evil idea – crystallized in this one defining year.

 

ACTIVITY

 

Part 1 – Claim, Evidence and Reasoning –

 

Author’s Claim:  1924 was the year that made Hitler

 

 Students will prove or disprove using text. 

 

Part 2 – Share Out Discussion -

 

Critical Thinking Questions –

 

How was media influential in Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How was the judiciary influential Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How did popular opinion influence Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How did imprisonment act as a haven for Hitler’s “hate ideology’?

 

To what do you attribute the recent rise in anti-Semitic fervor in the United States?

 

 

 

 

Summary &

Assessment:

 

 

 

Text Message:  Similar to a sentence summary, students will write a summary of the key learning in text message format.

 

 

Thursday and Friday

 

Lesson and Question:

HOW CAN WE AVOID THE TRAP OF TYRANNY THAT SURVIVES IN THE REALM OF “ISMS”?

   

Concept Terminology:

Tyranny, Fascism, Nazism, Communism, Marxism, Terrorism, Capitalism, Rule-of-Law, Oligarchy, Paramilitary, Great Terror, Einsatzgruppen, The Great Action, Fahrenheit 451, Orwell 1984, Vaclav Havel, Post-Truth, Solidary Labor Movement, Totalitarianism, Authoritarianism, Intellectual Property, Extremism, Perpetual State of Emergency, Reichstag Fire, Historical Generation

   

 

Warm Up:

 

 

VIDEO – On Tyranny:  Lessons From the 20th Century – Author Interview – Timothy Snyder at the Wilson Center  (11:16 mins)

 

https://youtu.be/A7RBWea31e8

 

According to author, what are the “isms” associated with Tyranny?

 

Quotation Interpretation:  “We don’t recognize history until it knocks on our door” – Timothy Snyder

 

Do you agree/disagree?  Be specific with your response.

 

Lesson Procedure:

 

 

 

WARM UP:   Above

 

INTRODUCTION:  Timothy Snyder gives us a new translation and interpretation to historical experiences, including Nazism, Fascism, Communism and Terrorism as precursors to Tyranny focusing on our need to recognize the structures of disaster as they unfold, as well as society stopping and thinking before we accept a new reality or ideology.  Tyrants are known to crafting alternative realities that people have readily adopted rather than questioned.

 

ACTIVITY

 

Students will analyze, evaluate, annotate and synthesize excerpted secondary source based on Timothy Snyder’s book entitled On Tyranny:  Lessons From the 20th Century using Silent Sustainable Reading Strategy.  Students will formulate a THESIS and support with evidence from the text.  Upon completion they will engage in a Conversation With Yourself  before Turn and Talk to discuss the following

Critical Thinking Questions in a Share Out format:

 

According to the author:

 

  1. How did tyrannical behavior unfold during Nazi Germany and during the Russian Revolution?  Cite evidence from the text.
  2. How can media or collective memory craft alternative realities?
  3. Should people “stop and think” and question new ideologies before blindly accepting them as truth?
  4. If we are to formulate a historical generation, how do we recognize the signs of impending tyranny as vigilant citizens?

 

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Periods-4, Monday-Friday, 1-16-18 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Monday

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify, compare, and contrast differing forms of government in the world today.

 

Standards

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

           

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Preparations

Prepare information using examples of different governments throughout the world for comparisons. MacGruder's American Government by Prentice Hall. Have students read Chapter 1 Section 2,pp. 12-18, followed by a formmative assessment (Forms of government and concepts of democracy).

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History

2. Bellringer: Students will copy a list from the Smart Board; direct democracy, indirect democracy, dictatorship, unitary government, federal government, confederation, presidential government, and parliamentary government. They will then circle each term that describes the U.S. government, then define each circled term.

3. Students will share and discuss their classifications that define The U.S. government.

4. Students will read pp. 12-14 on Participation and participate in Guided Discussion
5. FORMS OF GOVERNMENT-- Guided Discussion-(Where is the Power?)--UNITARY- a centralized government where all powers held by the government belong to a single, central agency. (Most gov'ts are unitary in form) Federal government-one in which the powers of government are divided between a central government and several local governments. CONFEDERATE GOV'T-an alliance of independent states. Most power is held by independent states leaving the central government weak. Explain the relationship between legislative & executive agencies--Presidential: separation of powers between the legislative and executive branches of government. Parliamentary: Executive is made up of the prime minister or premier and that of officials’ cabinet. They themselves are members of the legislative branch, the parliament. Dictatorship exists where those who rule cannot be held responsible to the will of the people.-dictatorship is probably the oldest & most common form of government known..

6. Discuss dictatorships based on the following; Why do dictatorships tend to endure for decades?  Why do dictatorships tend to go hand in hand with military power? What circumstances are likely to create a dictatorship?

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be based on a class discussion on why Dictatorships adopt some form of democratic governments, such as popular election and elected legislative bodies?

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Periods-4, Monday-Friday, 1-1618 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Tuesday and Wednesday

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify, compare, and contrast differing forms of government in the world today.

 

Objectives

  1. Students will compare and contrast democracies and dictatorships by predicting their responses in different situations.
  2. Classify governments according to three sets of characteristics.

3. Define governments based on who can participate

 

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

CS 1.2. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics

 

Preparations

Prepare information using examples of different governments throughout the world for comparisons. MacGruder's American Government by Prentice Hall. Have students read Chapter 1 Section 2,pp. 12-18, followed by a formative assessment (Forms of government and concepts of democracy).

 

 

Procedures

Students will be given a reading comprehension worksheet to complete. The students will read Ch. 1 Section 2, pp. 12-18. Students will complete the worksheet and then as a separate assignment answer the Section 2 Assessment questions #2, #3, and #5.

 

Assessment-Summative

Students understanding will be assessed based on the Reading Comprehension Worksheet and the Section assessment questions on p. 18.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 1-18-18 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Thursday and Friday

 

Description

This lesson will identify and explain the five concepts of democracy by using a graphic organizer and teach students to identify real-world examples of the five concepts.

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

CS 1.2. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics.        

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Identify and explain the five concepts of democracy by completing a graphic organizer.
  2. Identify real world examples by brainstorming and filling out a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Preparation

Assign Chapter 1 Section 3, pp. 20-24 and the graphic organizer in the text.

 

 

Procedure

Today in History and Quote of the Day

  1. Following the reading and completion of the students’ graphic organizers have volunteers provide definitions and express what each concept means to them.
  2. Ask the students what the term Free Enterprise means to them.
  3. Extend the discussion by asking the students the following questions; Why might going to school be a duty instead of a responsibility? Should volunteering be a duty rather than a responsibility? What would be the benefits of making voting a duty? What might happen if serving on a jury was a responsibility rather than a duty?

 

Assessment-Summative and Formative

Students graphic organizers 

Sectionalism and Civil War

World History Lesson Plans

Monday-Thursday 11/13 to 11/17

 

Lesson Plans 10/23 to 10/27

World History

Monday-Wednesday

Inventors of the Industrial Revolution

Interactive Powerepoint presentation

Have students complete the Inventor Chart and also require that they write questions they would like to know more about---one for each invention category. Do NOT have them take the quiz right away. Reconvene the class to share these questions for discussion and clarification purposes. Then have students return to the laptops for the quiz.

As a class discussion and lesson, have each student hypothesize what would have happened without a certain inventor by “subtracting” from the classroom, describing of things we use today traced back to the Industrial Revolution. For example, Betty says, “I subtract everything woven. We would all be wearing handwoven or hand-knit clothing if it weren’t for the Power Loom. If the class is split into two teams, they can earn points and compete by coming up with valid ideas.

  • Since the activities will take more than one class day- possibly as many as 3 or 4- have students recall something about each invention group from the day before to “earn” the right to be Vanna… or let the class play “stump Vanna” with invention questions from the previous days to remove the board operator and replace him/her. It is sometimes very helpful to have your most active and disruptive student operate the board because it keeps him/her on task and focused.
  •  
World History Lesson Plans 8/28 to 9/1

  Monday and Tuesday

 

Islamic Contributions to the World

 

 

Drinking industry and Distilled liquids

It was Muslim chemists who first invented pure distillation processes, which could fully purify chemical substances.
Purified distilled alcohol by Jabir ibn Hayyan in the 8th century

 

Hygiene industries

True soap made of vegetable oils (such as olive oil) or with

aromatics (such as thyme oil)were invented by al-Razi Rhazes.  Perfumed and colored soaps and liquid and solid soaps were also invented by Muslim chemists as well.

 

Islamic Astronomy: Astronomical instruments

Muslim astronomers developed a number of astronomical instruments, These instruments were used by Muslims for a variety of purposes related to astronomy, astrology, horoscopes, navigation, surveying, and timekeeping.

 

Analog Machines (or Computers)

The Plate of Conjunctions, a computing instrument used to determine the time of day invented by al-Kashi in the 15th century. A mechanical planetary computer called the Plate of Zones could predict the true positions in longitude of the Sun and Moon, and the planets in terms of elliptical orbits.

 

Parachute

In 9th century Islamic Spain, Abbas Ibn Firnas (Armen Firnas) invented a primitive version of the parachute and the hand glider.

 

Camera

Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen), the "father of optics" and pioneer of the modern scientific method, invented the camera obscura and pinhole camera.He was the first person to realize that rays of light enters the eye, rather than leaving it, The word "camera" comes from the Arabic word qamara for a dark or private room. Ibn al-Haytham first described pinhole camera after noticing the way light came through a hole in window shutters.

 

Chemical technology

Jabir ibn Hayyan (Geber), the father of chemistry, invented the alembic still and many chemicals, including distilled alcohol, and established the perfume industry.

 

Street lighting and litter collection facilities

The first street lamps were built in the Arab Empire, especially in Cordoba, which also had the first facilities and waste containers for litter collection.

 

Clock technology



Astronomical clocks
Muslim astronomers and engineers constructed a variety of highly accurate astronomical clocks for use in their observatories.

 

Mechanical clocks

The first mechanical clocks driven by weights, and gears and were invented by Muslim engineers. The first geared mechanical clocks were invented by the 11th century Arab engineer Ibn Khalaf al-Muradi from Islamic Spain.

 

Paper mill

Paper was introduced to the Muslim world by Chinese prisoners after the Battle of Talas. Muslims made several improvements to papermaking and built the first paper mills in Baghdad, Iraq, as early as 794.

 

Sugar refinery

The first sugar refineries were built by Muslim engineers. They were first driven by water mills, and then windmills from the 9th and 10th centuries in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iran.

 

Fountain pen

The earliest historical record of a reservoir fountain pen dates back to the 10th century. In 953, Ma'ad al-Mu'izz, the caliph of Egypt, demanded a pen, which would not stain his hands or clothes, and was provided with a pen, which held ink in a reservoir.

 

On/off switch

The on and off switch was invented by Muslim engineers between the 9th and 12th centuries. It was employed in a variety of automatic and water clocks. The mechanism later had an influence on the development of the electric on/off switch, which appeared in the 1950s

 

Medical Technology

Muslim physicians pioneered a number of medical treatments, including: Tracheotomy by Ibn Zuhr in the 12th century. Muslim anesthesiologist invented inoculations, modern oral and inhalant anesthesia as well as the first smallpox vaccine in the form of cowpox. At least 2,000 medicinal substances were invented by Muslim technology.

 

Medical university and public hospital

The Islamic hospital-universities were the first free public hospitals, the first medical schools, and the first universities to issue diplomas. The first of these institutions was opened in Baghdad. They then appeared in Egypt from 872 and then in Islamic Spain, Persia and the Maghreb thereafter. Physicians and surgeons at Islamic hospital-universities gave lectures to medical students and a diploma would be issued to any student who completed his/her education and was qualified to be a doctor of Medicine.

 

Military technology

After the spread of early gunpowder from China to the Muslim world, Muslim chemists and engineers developed compositions for explosive gunpowder and their own weapons for use in gunpowder warfare.

 

Hand cannon, handgun, portable firearms

The first portable hand cannons (midfa) loaded with explosive gunpowder, the first example of a handgun and portable firearms were used by the Egyptians to repel the Mongols at the Battle of Ain Jalut in 1260, and again in 1304. 

 

Wednesday and Thursday

THE ENLIGHTENMENT  

Until the late 1700’s, people of France accepted the fact that their king ruled by divine right, that Church teachings were correct, and that well-to-do nobles had privileges not enjoyed by the poor. But by the end of the century, Frenchmen no longer accepted these beliefs. This change in attitude came about as the result of writings by a group know as the ‘philisophes’. The philisophes were intelligent, reasonable men who felt there was much about life in Europe that was unfair and unjust. Since most philosophes were from France and since France was ruled by an absolute monarchy surrounded by a privileged nobility, the French way of life came under particular attack. The chart which follows lists four leading thinkers of the 1700’s. They published writings during a perid called the Age of Reason, or Enlightenment. Many ideas from the Enlightenment were eventually adopted by countries in Europe and around the world. Ideas even spread to the United States and are today a part of our way of life. Read each statement by the philisophes given on the chart and decide whether the statement is a true description of present American life. If it is true of the United States today, fill in the space with yes. If the ideas or attitude is not true of present life in the U.S., put no in the space. 

The philisophes were intelligent, reasonable men who felt there was much about life in Europe that was unfair and unjust. Since most philosophes were from France and since France was ruled by an absolute monarchy surrounded by a privileged nobility, the French way of life came under particular attack. The chart which follows lists four leading thinkers of the 1700’s. They published writings during a perid called the Age of Reason, or Enlightenment. Many ideas from the Enlightenment were eventually adopted by countries in Europe and around the world. Ideas even spread to the United States and are today a part of our way of life. Read each statement by the philisophes given on the chart and decide whether the statement is a true description of present American life. If it is true of the United States today, fill in the space with yes. If the ideas or attitude is not true of present life in the U.S., put no in the space. 

John Locke 1. All men are free and equal at birth. 2. Everyone has the right to life liberty, & property. 3. Citizens have the right to overthrow the government when their natural rights are violated. 4. Rulers receive the right to govern from the people and unfair rulers can be forced from power. 5. Man is not born to be a good or evil person – he is made one way or other by his life experiences and society around him. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ Baron de Montesquieu 1. An absolute ruler in an  Baron de Montesquieu 1. An absolute ruler in an undesirable leader because one-man rule limits basic freedoms such as speech, press, and religion. 2. There should be a ‘separation of powers’ in government between legislative, executive and judicial. 3. Slavery, torture, religious persecution, and censorship are all wrong. 4. A man is innocent until proven guilty. 5. When one country increases its military power, so do other countries; therefore all nations should limit their military strength in order to reduce the chances of war. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______   

Voltaire 1. A man should not be persecuted because of his religious beliefs. 2. Religious myths and ceremonies do nothing to make men better and should therefore be ignored. 3. Clergymen are more interested in increasing the power of the Church that they are in making man better. 4. A scientist is a greater person then a conquering general. 5. All men should be treated as equals and should have freedom of the speech and of the press. 6. Democracy is not a good form of government because the common people are not capable of governing themselves; the best government is one headed by a good and fair king. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ 6. _______ 

Rousseau 1. It is unfair that some people are rich while other people are poor. 2. The rich should not enjoy special privileges. 3. Compared to man during the Stone Age, modern man is unhappy, insecure, and greedy. 4. Social and political reforms must be made before man can be a good person. 5. Democracy is a good form of government. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ 

QUESTIONS: 1. In the philosophes were alive today, do you think they would be generally satisfied or dissatisfied with social conditions and the type of government we have today. EXPLAIN! _______________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ 2. Which three statements by the philosophes do you believe are of the greatest importance to mankind? a. ___________________________________________________________________ b. ___________________________________________________________________ c. ___________________________________________________________________

 

  3. Choose one of the statements and tell why you disagree with it. a. Statement: __________________________________________________________ b. Reason for disagreement ________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 4. Not all the philosophes held the same beliefs, but most agreed that: a. Reason should be used at all times b. The search for new knowledge and ideas should continue c. Improvements must be made in the system of justice to end unfair jail sentences, the torture of prisoners, and terrible conditions in prisons. d. Slavery and warfare should be done away with e. Freedom of religion, speech and press must be given to all f. Everyone should enjoy liberty and equality. g. There should be public education for all, not just schools for children of the wealthy.  

Bill Nobles Lesson Plans World History

Lesson Plans 05/07 to 05/11

Objectives

World History Monday and Tuesday       Regional Conflict

Students will

  • research the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and
  • answer questions from textbook on Israeli or a Palestinian issues.

Materials

 

  • Print resources about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
  • Paper, pens

Procedures

  1. Discuss the background of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict featured in the video. These questions will help focus the discussion:
    • Who is involved in this conflict?
    • What region is at the heart of the conflict? Describe the claim that both groups have on this region.
    • What is Israel? When was it founded and by whom?
    • What is the Zionist Movement?
    • Describe the role of the U.S. in the establishment of Israel, a Jewish state.
    • How did the Holocaust affect the formation of a Jewish homeland?
    • What is the PLO? Whom does it represent?
    • Which nations are opposed to a Jewish state? (Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and Egypt)
    • What was the intifada? Who was involved and what caused it?
    • What caused the rise of militant Islam? What is its link to modern terrorism?
    • What is Hamas
  1. After students have completed their research, have them write a personal account, such as a letter or journal entry, from the point of view of an Israeli or Palestinian student. The accounts can be written in the present day or in the past, but they must reflect a major event in the history of the conflict and they should include several details based on research. Challenge students to consider how it must feel to live in the midst of such a conflict.
  2. Have students work in pairs to critique each other's work. Was the account believable? Was it clear when and by whom it was supposed to be written? Did the account include relevant facts based on research? Did it reflect how a young person might feel living in the midst of conflict? Students should revise their writing based on the critique.
  3. Collect the accounts and make copies for everyone in the class. As a homework assignment, have students read the accounts and come prepared to discuss them the next day.

To conclude the lesson, lead a discussion about the accounts. How did students imagine it would feel to be involved in such a conflict? Did they imagine differences between Palestinian and Israeli students? How might their experiences be similar? What was most challenging about writing this assignment? Do students think it is difficult for most Americans to understand the emotions behind the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? Why or why not?

World History Wednesday through Friday

Regional Conflict continued

Background on the Conflict Over KashmiThe Problem: Both India and Pakistan wish to control Kashmir.

Why do both India and Pakistan believe control of Kashmir is so important? The people of Kashmir are still tribal in nature. The geography is mostly rural, with fierce mountains, deserts, and valleys. Industry is undeveloped. If this region has natural resources such as oil or gold or silver in any quantity, this has not yet been discovered. Why the fuss

Background on the Conflict Over KashmirThe Problem: Both India and Pakistan wish to control Kashmir.Why do both India and Pakistan believe control of Kashmir is so important? The people of Kashmir are still tribal in nature. The geography is mostly rural, with fierce mountains, deserts, and valleys. Industry is undeveloped. If this region has natural resources such as oil or gold or silver in any quantity, this has not yet been discovered. Why the fuss?

  1. Control of the Indus River. The headwaters of the Indus River are located in Kashmir. Whomever controls the headwaters, controls the river. The Indus is vital. It brings green fertile life wherever it flows. The Indus begins in Kashmir, then flows through Pakistan, then flows into mainland India. If India chose, since Kashmir is part of India, they could dam the Indus and change the flow of the river. Without fertile land to grow crops, Pakistan would become a desert and its people would starve. Pakistan does not trust India, nor does India trust Pakistan. They will not share control of the Indus. They both want total control.

  2. Religious Sites. Both Pakistan and India have sites in Kashmir that are important to their respective religions.
    * Pakistan is predominately Muslim. Kashmir is predominately Muslim.
    * India is predominately Hindu.

  3. Strategic Location. For India, Kashmir acts as a buffer. For Pakistan, Kashmir offers a fertile roadway into India for possible invasion.

 

Who controls Kashmir today, and why? Approximately sixty years ago, Kashmir was offered a choice by the UN of becoming part of India, part of Pakistan, or becoming independent. To secure Kashmir for Pakistan, in what Muslim forces perceived to be a holy war, Pakistan invaded Kashmir. The ruler of Kashmir fled to India and agreed to place Kashmir under Indian rule if India would protect Kashmir from invasion. If there had been a vote in Kashmir, a vote by the people, the majority probably would have voted to become part of Pakistan for religious reasons. Since there was no vote, Pakistan has never accepted India's control of Kashmir. Pakistan believed then and still believes today that Kashmir should be part of Pakistan. However, for many years now, Kashmir has been part of India, just as Hawaii and California and Alaska are part of the United States.

The people of Kashmir have the same rights as any citizen in India. They have excellent schools. They have television. They have computer access just like the rest of India. Kashmir is predominately Muslim. Muslims only believe in Islamic learnings. Thus, although the people of Kashmir do not always use the benefits available to them, they are available.

 

War & Terrorism: Both India and Pakistan are convinced that they are right and that they will prevail if they continue their fight as they are doing, although this plan has not worked in six decades. In the past 60 years, Pakistan and India have fought three wars over ownership of Kashmir. India won all three. Today, the fight continues with acts of terrorism. The people of Kashmir are probably wondering why the UN won't help them and why the US won't help them. Why must they live with war and terror and what can be done?

Why doesn't the US lend a helping hand with the Kashmir conflict? The US wants to be friends with both Pakistan and India. That makes US involvement in this problem very difficult. On one hand, we have a treaty with Pakistan that says if they go to war with anyone, we will help them. We will honor that treaty. Pakistan shares a border with Afganistan. In our fight on terrorism, that border is most important, and Pakistan's help is critical. On the other hand, we don't want India mad at us. We do a great deal of trade with India that is mutually advantageous. But mostly, India is our friend. If Pakistan goes to war with India, we would have a really tough time with that. So, we try very hard not to get involved. We couldn't win.

When your students come up with any or all of the following solutions, here are some roadblocks you can use.

  • Student Suggestion: Maybe Pakistan could buy Kashmir.
    Teacher Response: It's not about money, although perhaps it's about something money could buy - food. India has the 2nd largest population in the world. They are very crowded. Kashmir has fertile valleys that could produce a lot of food. At the moment they're not producing a lot of food, but they could. India's planners see this potential and want it to feed their population. India is not about to sell or to give away Kashmir. They need it.

  • Student Suggestion: Maybe all the Muslims could move to Pakistan or the Hindus and Sikhs could move to mainland India.
    Teacher Response: People don't want to give up the homes they have lived in for thousands of years. Their life is there. If you try to make them move, you'll start a rein of terror instead of ending one.

  • Student Suggestion: How about a shared government?
    Teacher Response: Pakistan, of course, wants to protect their country and their people. But India refuses to share control of the Indus or of Kashmir.

  • Student Suggestion: How about an Independent Kashmir? Or better yet, let the people decide.
    Teacher Response: Great. Let's ask the people of Kashmir what they want. (Teacher represents the people of Kashmir.) You would probably start a civil war, whatever the outcome of the vote. And if the US helped to set up a vote, the US would risk insulting our good friend India and our good friend Pakistan, which is something the US is not eager to do. But it's a mute point. India is not about to give up Kashmir.

At this point, your students will probably be pretty much convinced that the problem is India. India is not willing to share, thus they are the culprit. When your students say so, which they will, then bring up examples of what the US government has and would do in similar situations in the US.

  • Say: The US fought a Civil War (Northern War of Aggression, War Between the States) when the south wanted to set up their own country. The south had the food. The north had the industry. You need both to be strong. The US did not allow the south to leave, just as India will not allow Kashmir to leave.

  • Ask: What if Canada announced that they wanted Alaska to be part of Canada because they wanted to control the oil Alaska produces? Would the US say - look at the geography. That's so sensible. (No way.)

  • Ask: What if the residents of San Diego, a major seaport in California, voted to become part of Mexico by an overwhelming 80% majority? Would the US government say okay? (No way.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Monday

Issues of Our Time

Objectives

l Students will examine the debate on the size of government using the question of the extent of the government’s involvement in education.

Overview/Materials Pacing

Standard

Block

 

Take a Poll

Description

Ask: What level of government should be responsible for the quality of your education?

(a) federal (b) State (c) local (d) none of these

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Summarize the Issue

Description

Have students read the feature and summarize the issue and the views

expressed in the quotes. L2 ELL Differentiate Write these terms and

definitions on the board: accountable ( responsible), curriculum (the course of study in a school), mandate (an order or command), accessible (that can be approached).

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Description

Since the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002, there has been continuing debate on the program’s value. Display Transparency 15H, No Child Left Behind. Supporters claim that it makes schools accountable for the quality of their education, while critics state that it promotes lower achievement goals. The program has also revived the debate on whether the Federal

Government is interfering in a realm that should be a State and local responsibility.

Ask: Should the Federal Government control the quality of our education system?

(yes: because education affects the nation’s competitive edge; no: because federal funding to states should not be tied to students’ test results) Does this program overstep the scope of National Government? (Answers will vary.) Then take another poll using the question at the beginning of the lesson. If students have changed their

stance, ask why.

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

 

Assessments-Formative

Informal assessment through discussion questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Tuesday

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Wednesday

Issues of Our Time

Objectives

l Students will examine the debate on the size of government using the question of the extent of the government’s involvement in education.

Take a Poll

Description

Ask: What level of government should be responsible for the quality of your education?

(a) federal (b) State (c) local (d) none of these

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Summarize the Issue

Description

Have students read the feature and summarize the issue and the views

expressed in the quotes. L2 ELL Differentiate Write these terms and

definitions on the board: accountable ( responsible), curriculum (the course of study in a school), mandate (an order or command), accessible (that can be approached).

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Description

Since the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002, there has been continuing debate on the program’s value. Display Transparency 15H, No Child Left Behind. Supporters claim that it makes schools accountable for the quality of their education, while critics state that it promotes lower achievement goals. The program has also revived the debate on whether the Federal

Government is interfering in a realm that should be a State and local responsibility.

Ask: Should the Federal Government control the quality of our education system?

(yes: because education affects the nation’s competitive edge; no: because federal funding to states should not be tied to students’ test results) Does this program overstep the scope of National Government? (Answers will vary.) Then take another poll using the question at the beginning of the lesson. If students have changed their stance, ask why.

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

 

Assessments-Formative

Informal assessment through discussion questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Thursday

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Friday

Issues of Our Time

Objectives

l Students will examine the debate on the size of government using the question of the extent of the government’s involvement in education

Take a Poll

Description

Ask: What level of government should be responsible for the quality of your education?

(a) federal (b) State (c) local (d) none of these

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Summarize the Issue

Description

Have students read the feature and summarize the issue and the views

expressed in the quotes. L2 ELL Differentiate Write these terms and

definitions on the board: accountable ( responsible), curriculum (the course of study in a school), mandate (an order or command), accessible (that can be approached).

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Description

Since the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002, there has been continuing debate on the program’s value. Display Transparency 15H, No Child Left Behind. Supporters claim that it makes schools accountable for the quality of their education, while critics state that it promotes lower achievement goals. The program has also revived the debate on whether the Federal

Government is interfering in a realm that should be a State and local responsibility.

Ask: Should the Federal Government control the quality of our education system?

(yes: because education affects the nation’s competitive edge; no: because federal funding to states should not be tied to students’ test results) Does this program overstep the scope of National Government? (Answers will vary.) Then take another poll using the question at the beginning of the lesson. If students have changed their

stance, ask why.

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Assessments-Formative

Informal assessment through discussion questions.

 

 

 

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plans W. Hist and Gov't 4/30 to 5/04

Lesson Plans W. History

Monday

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Tuesday

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Wednesday-Friday

\Defining The term Poor in  a global context

  • entrepreneurship
  • rule of law
  • incentives
  • property rights
  • limited government

NATIONAL VOLUNTARY CONTENT STANDARDS IN ECONOMICSThe background materials and student activities in lesson 1, part 2 address parts of the following national voluntary content standards and benchmarks in economics. Students will learn that:

Standard 4: People respond predictably to positive and negative incentives.

  • Acting as consumers, producers, workers, savers, investors, and citizens, people respond to incentives in order to allocate their scarce resources in ways that provide the highest possible returns to them.

Standard 10: Institutions evolve in market economies to help individuals and groups accomplish their goals. Banks, labor unions, corporations, legal systems, and not-for-profit organizations are examples of important institutions. A different kind of institution, clearly defined and well-enforced property rights, is essential to a market economy.

  • Property rights, contract enforcement, standards for weights and measures, and liability rules affect incentives for people to produce and exchange goods and services.

INTRODUCTION AND LESSON THEME

The prevailing image of a “capitalist” may be an American businessman, but a survey of the world’s economies reveals that, like poverty, capitalism has many faces. “Capitalist” is used, in either praise or condemnation, to label many nations, and the label is claimed –whether deservedly or not – by many more. To begin a systematic analysis of whether capitalism is good for the poor requires a working agreement on just exactly what capitalism is.

In the last half of the 20th century, courses in “comparative systems” were found in many universities, and high school textbooks routinely had chapters bearing that title. The content typically consisted of comparing and contrasting capitalism, communism, socialism, and, occasionally, fascism, each of which was conceived of as a discrete entity or “system.” Unfortunately, the usefulness of the paradigm decayed in the face of the persistence with which actual economies crossed the lines between systems.

For example, the standard textbook definition of capitalism as “a market economy in which the means of production are privately owned,” raises more questions than it answers:

  • Must ALL production be private?
  • Is the United States truly a capitalist economy when mass transit services in most cities are publicly funded, and 1st-class mail is delivered by the federal government?
  • How could the Soviet Union have been considered truly “communist,” when peasant farmers were allowed to sell their garden produce in open markets?

Additionally, the traditional conception of “systems” was unwieldy because it incorporated the political and governmental characteristics of nations, often without specifically addressing how those characteristics altered economic institutions.

Using an institutional definition of capitalism allows us to avoid the problems of a one-size-fits-all definition. Using the framework of institutional economics, developed by Nobel laureate and economic historian, Douglass North, allows us to identify specific institutional components of capitalism and to analyze their characteristics in particular times and places.

We begin, therefore, by asserting that capitalist economies share an identifying set of institutions, whose different manifestations in practice have a similar foundation. While it may take some careful looking to see the similarities underneath the striking differences between such places as China and the Netherlands, the United States and Uganda, or India and Argentina, these similarities do exist.

The hallmark of capitalism is the existence of a particular set of institutions governing the production and exchange of goods and services. Elements of capitalism are found in almost all nations, but the forms and degrees of capitalism vary widely.

As in part 1, the purpose of this background outline is to set the stage for the investigation by creating a common vocabulary to facilitate future discussion of poverty and capitalism.

KEY POINTS

  1. Overview: In addition to U.S. capitalism, other current and recent forms include:
    • Chinese (communist) capitalism
    • western European capitalism
    • former-Soviet republics capitalism
    • African (dictator-based) capitalism
    • The different forms share similarities and manifest significant differences.
      • Capitalist economies share a set of key institutions. However, the characteristics of the shared institutions vary greatly from one capitalist country to the next
      • In their differences lies the explanation for their differing levels of success in reducing poverty.
  2. Key terms and concepts:
    • Institutions are the established behavior practices and patterns upon which the life of a community is built. Nobel laureate and economic historian Douglass North calls them “the rules of the game.” They are fixtures of people’s interactions with one another.
      • Formal institutions, like constitutions and statutory law, codify the rules under which the members of the economy interact.
      • Informal institutions and expectations of behavior are at least as important as formal institutions.
        • Doug North argues, in fact, that informal institutions may exert even more influence over behavior than formal laws. Laws may have little ability to shape behavior if they do not match up with informal but ingrained cultural and social norms.
        • Additionally, while formal laws may be changed at any time, informal institutional arrangements tend to be persistent and change very slowly.
    • Institutions influence behavior by shaping incentives.
    • Incentives are rewards and punishments for behavior.
    • Economists have long recognized that people react to incentives in predictable ways. Incentives, rather than nebulous forces like “national character,” explain observable patterns of economic decision-making.
      • North argued, by way of illustration, that if a nation’s institutions rewarded piracy, for example, then its people would face incentives to become pirates – and would do so in greater numbers than in nations without such incentives, regardless of their cultural background.
      • He also argued that institutions are not neutral: that different institutional forms may give advantages to different groups. Because that is the case, the “players” in the economy realize that changing the rules can give them an advantage, and thus they will devote resources to effect those changes.
        • Organizations such as political parties, companies, trade unions, and bureaucracies want to survive and benefit in a given institutional setting, so they will invest in trying to change the rules to increase the benefits they receive from the system. (Grossman)
        • In this sense, we must recognize that economic institutions are not immune to politics. Although Is Capitalism Good for the Poor?concentrates on the functioning of economic institutions, it is important to remember that economic institutions do not operate independently and that they are always constrained, to a greater or lesser degree, by political and governmental institutions.
  3. The common set of institutions shared by capitalist economies is:
    1. markets – institutions governing voluntary exchange;
    2. entrepreneurship – institutions governing risks and rewards of organizing resources for production;
    3. property rights – institutions governing the ownership, use and transfer of private property; and
    4. the rule of law – the extent and limits of authority and privilege.
    • The characteristics of these institutions vary greatly from country to country.
      • The result is a broad spectrum of “capitalist” practices, some empowering the poor, and some holding them back.
  4. Analogy: Institutions are the threads in a nation’s “social fabric.”
    • Like cloth fabrics, a social fabric is constructed of interwoven threads. Cloth threads are cotton, linen, wool, or synthetics; the threads from which a “social fabric” is woven are institutions.
    • This analogy also helps us to explain the variety in capitalist economies. Consider that even cloth fabrics made from only one type of thread may look and feel different. Cotton thread may be spun in different ways – bulky, thin, smooth, or rough – and the resulting cloth has a distinctive look and feel.
      • Similarly, any single capitalist institution (markets, private property, rule of law, or entrepreneurship) may take on various forms, depending on factors such as the culture, government, and history of the nation.
        • Markets, for example, differ in the extent of regulation and openness.
          • At one end of the spectrum are Hong Kong’s virtually unregulated markets, which provide almost all goods and services.
          • In Western Europe, markets provide most products, but the government provides health care, and many forms of communication and transportation.
          • At the other end of the spectrum, China’s markets provide few products; they are restricted to agriculture and a few government-selected manufactured goods.
  5. The historical record shows that the success with which a capitalist economy deals with poverty depends on the institutional forms it adopts. Some forms of capitalism have successfully generated the economic progress that alleviates poverty. Others have failed to do so.
    • In successful capitalist nations, the institutional threads have the following distinctive characteristics:
      1. Property rights are clearly defined and secured.
        • The definition of property rights includes individuals’ rights to self (labor) and possessions
      2. The rule of law prevails within a framework of limited government
        • Note that just having democratic political institutions is notsufficient to satisfy this requirement.
      3. Markets are open and competitive.
        • Competitive interaction creates an ethic in which individuals’ choices have consequences.
      4. Entrepreneurship is fostered by incentives to invent, innovate and produce.

CONCLUSION

The student activity “Will the Real Capitalism Please Stand Up?” is a small-group discussion exercise to familiarize students with the range of capitalist economies, and to give them practice in identifying the institutions – markets, entrepreneurship, property rights, and rule of law – that form the foundation of capitalism.

The next 4 lessons in Is Capitalism Good for the Poor? investigate the operation of the distinctive capitalist institutions found in nations experiencing economic growth:

  • Lesson 2: Property Rights and the Rule of Law
  • Lesson 3: Beneficiaries of Competition
  • Lesson 4: How Incentives Affect Innovation
  • Lesson 5: Character Values and Capitalism.

Together, the lessons teach students to use the tools of economic reasoning to evaluate the relationship between capitalism and poverty. The lessons address the prevailing belief that capitalism oppresses the poor and reserves its benefits for the rich. They provide the data and analytical tools for students and teachers to draw their own conclusions and to answer for themselves the question, Is Capitalism Good for the Poor?

 

 

Lesson Plans    Government

Economic Systems

traditional, market, command, and mixed economies

 

 

Grade Level and Course:

10th Grade  Government – 48 minute class periods

 

District Standards:

Analyze and compare traditional, market, command, and mixed economies as organizing systems for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. (OK 4.1.1)

 

NCSS and/or Common Core Standards:

NCSS VII. PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND CONSUMPTION

Have learners compare basic economic systems according to how they deal with demand, supply, prices, the role of government, banks, labor and labor unions, savings and investments, and capital;

 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.

 

Essential Question:

What are the different kinds of economic systems?

 

Learning Objectives:

            Substantive: Students will/will be able to…

  •  Identify aspects of market systems and categorize elements of each system

 

            Disciplinary & Language-focused: Students will/will be able to…

  •   Define traditional, market, command, and mixed economies

           

Informal & Formal Assessment:

Substantive – Formal – Descriptions of Economic Systems worksheet

Informal – Verbal check for understanding.  Students should be able to properly categorize the type of economy presented in the “Cave-o-nomics” short film.

 

Language focused – Informal – verbal check for appropriate use of vocabulary terms

 

Resources & Materials:  

 

Instructional Activities/Learning Tasks:

 

Warm-Up

  • Students will be asked to guess what the relationship between the following words: traditional, market, command, and mixed (2 min)

Main Instructional Activities/Learning Tasks

  • Students will view and take notes on PowerPoint lecture describing different kinds of economies and their elements. (20 min)
  • Students will read descriptions of different fictional country’s economies and will sort each economy by category. (15 min)

 

Closure

  • Students will view a short film “Cave-o-nomics” and will be asked to identify what type of economy is being portrayed in the film. (7 min)

 

Modifications/Differentiation:

  • Students in inclusion classrooms will have the teacher read aloud the country’s description and will work together as a large group to identify what kind of economy the country belongs to.
  • Students with IEPs will be provided with a partially completed note-taker and will fill in the blanks as we go through lecture.
Lesson Plans Govt and W. Hist. 4/23 to 4/27

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Haskell High School

4-23-18 to 4-27-18

 

Date: Monday and Tuesday

 

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

     

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Haskell High School

4-23-18 to 4-27-18

 

Date: Wednesday-Friday

 

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

     

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.

 

World History

Bill Nobles

Haskell High School

4-23-18 to 4-27-18

Monday

Students will read the following handout

The War is Finished

This chapter tells the story of the collapse of the South Vietnamese army and government. It raises

the question whether the U.S. deserted its ally at the end of a noble, if unsuccessful, effort or if it

simply had made a serious mistake from the beginning.

Readers will remember that the final peace agreement signed on January 27, 1973, allowed

President Thieu and his government to remain in power during the U.S. withdrawal. The treaty also

allowed the North Vietnamese to stay in South Vietnam, and called for an election to unite North and

South Vietnam. The election would be supervised by a 'National Council of Reconciliation', and not the

present government of South Vietnam. This Council was to be set up 'immediately after the cease-fire.'

North Vietnamese government officials were prepared to use the election to take control of South

Vietnam. They gave orders for their followers in the south to prepare for a political campaign. If they did

not win, of course, North Vietnam still had a 145,000-man army in South Vietnam.

President Thieu, however, never planned to allow a communist take over of South Vietnam by way

of an election. "If we allow the communists to operate," he said, "we will lose control of the country." That

explains his order to his police the day after he signed the Paris Peace Accord, to kill Vietnamese "who

suddenly begin taking a communist tone."

Violations of the Cease Fire

As it turned out, both sides cheated on the peace agreement before it even went into effect. Shortly

after he accepted the in-place cease-fire, Henry Kissinger telegraphed Thieu to take more territory from

the Vietcong. The day before the agreement was signed, the Vietcong took over some 300 villages

controlled by South Vietnam. On the first day of the peace agreement the South Vietnamese government

started attacking these villages to drive the Vietcong out.

From the winter of 1973 to the spring of 1975, the South Vietnamese government more or less

followed the orders given by President Thieu. Communists were arrested and put in jail. No steps were

taken to form the National Council of Reconciliation that was supposed to prepare for an election. And no

elections were held.

Corruption in South Vietnam

According to an old Vietnamese expression, 'a house leaks from the top.' President Thieu promoted

military officers based on their loyalty to him, and not their ability and performance as soldiers. He did

nothing to stop the corruption in his government. Thieu' s wife and her friends made millions of US

dollars buying and selling real estate in Saigon. They made their purchases based on what they knew the

government wanted to buy. Generals kept the money that was supposed to pay their soldiers. Army

officers sold weapons and ammunition to the Vietcong. Soldiers who were supposed to deliver military

supplies to the ARVN sold them on the black market. People who criticized the government were

arrested and thrown in jail. At the very bottom of this chain of corruption, the South Vietnamese soldier

did not have enough money to feed his family. Poorly motivated, led, trained, and fed, when the time

came, he was not prepared to fight.

Stage 3 of Guerrilla War

The South Vietnamese had failed to take the first steps that were supposed to lead to the Council of

National Reconciliation that would run free and democratic elections. The North Vietnamese

subsequently prepared for their final military campaign. After years of guerrilla warfare, North Vietnam

was prepared for Stage 3 — large unit attacks. The famous Ho Chi Minh trail, that for years had been

used to infiltrate men and supplies into South Vietnam, was a narrow jungle trail under protective

covering of trees. North Vietnam converted the trail into an all-weather highway. It stretched from North

Vietnam, through Laos and Cambodia and into the Mekong delta, south of Saigon. With its various

feeder roads, it covered 12,000 miles. A 3,000-mile long pipeline was built to supply needed gas for the

North Vietnamese army. The road even had rest, service and repair stations. Anti-aircraft guns guarded

the roadway. Trucks, tanks and armed cars drove south down these roads. The Vietnamese had come a

long way from their guerrilla war days, and when the time came, they would be ready to strike.

Stage 3 of guerrilla warfare, full army attacks, began on March 10, 1975. First the South Vietnamese

Air Force was chased off by Russian anti-aircraft guns. Then North Vietnamese tanks poured in to their

first targeted town, Banmethout. Suddenly confronted by Russian tanks and a well-armed enemy, South

Vietnamese troops panicked and fled.

President Thieu decided to give up all of his positions near the North Vietnam border to

concentrate his troops in the southern region around Saigon. Then he changed his mind and ordered a

defense of the North. But the army general defending Pleiku fled by plane, leaving his soldiers and their

families to escape on their own. Before long some 200,000 leaderless men, women, and children were

fleeing toward Danang on the coast. But Danang itself was under attack. Soon, the South Vietnamese

army had turned into a terrorized mob of fleeing men. They used their weapons, if at all, to shoot

civilians in their path. Reaching the water's edge:

the soldiers went down to the beach, where some threw away their weapons and their uniforms

and dived into the sea to swim out to waiting American ships, while others commandeered boats

and then began firing at one another on the open water. Soon the scenes in Danang were repeated

in cities through most of South Vietnam. In one city, the soldiers were shooting at the owners of

the restaurants where they ate. Something deeper than the collapse of an army's discipline was

taking place. It was the disintegration of a society that had been pulverized by war and corrupted

by foreign invaders for thirty years. A society that had lost all sense of self-respect and that

despised itself for its subservience to one foreign master after another — a society that had been

turned into a literal brothel for millions of soldiers from foreign countries — was tearing itself

apart in a fury of self-destruction.23

Similar scenes were taking place in other cities. Thieu's million-man army equipped with excellent

American weapons simply self-destructed seeking some kind of safety, somewhere other than in

Vietnam.

The Last Days of Saigon

This spreading panic threatened Saigon as that city prepared to defend itself. Gerald Ford, formerly

Nixon’s vice-President, became commander in chief in 1974 after Richard Nixon resigned because of his

23 The New Yorker, (April 14, 1975), pp. 27-28.

involvement in the cover up of a break-in of the Democratic Party headquarters in Watergate. President

Ford and his Secretary of State, Henry Kissinger, asked Congress for another $700 million to defend the

rest of South Vietnam. But Congress, by this time tired of the long war, refused. Kissinger, Thieu and

others later blamed the U.S. Congress for the defeat, which followed.

One month after the fall of

Danang the North Vietnamese army

marched into Saigon. As the enemy army

approached the capital, the ARVN

collapsed completely and surrendered

with hardly a fight. With it, billions of

dollars of U.S. equipment fell into the

hands of North Vietnam. Meanwhile

men, women and children tried

desperately to escape the enemy. Fifty

thousand people fled Saigon the week

before the communist forces arrived.

Seven thousand were air lifted by

helicopter to waiting U.S. ships off shore

in the last 18 hours. The million

Vietnamese who had depended on the

U.S. had good reason to fear living under

control of the victorious communist army

after 29 years of brutal warfare.

Although the outcome certainly could not please the U.S., at least the long war was finally over.

Assessment/Formal and Summative

Start discussion centered around topics outlined below. Students will then begin formal assessment.

 Student Exercises:

1. Describe and try to account for the failure of the 1973 peace agreement and the subsequent collapse of

the South Vietnamese government in the Spring of 1975.

2. Do you think that Congress made the right decision not to vote for an additional $700 million to defend

Saigon? Why or why not?

3. Given the final outcome of the war, evaluate U.S. policy in Vietnam - a mistake from the beginning or a

noble, but unsuccessful effort. Explain. (Note: last chapter focuses totally on this question).

 

World History

Bill Nobles

4-16-18 to 4-20-18

Tuesday and Wednesday

Students will review unit exam on the 1960’s and the Vietnam War and then take the examon the following day.

World History

Bill Nobles

Thursday and Friday

 Journey through the United States Domestic and Foreign Policy from 1970 to 199

Performance Expectations:

V. Individuals, Groups, and Institutions

c. describe the various forms institutions take, and explain how they develop and change over time

VI. Power Authority, & Governance

i. evaluate the extent to which governments achieve their stated ideals and policies at home and abroad;

What is the student going to learn and why?

The student will learn about domestic and foreign policy in the United States throughout the 1970s until the fall of the Soviet Union. They will be addressing the challenges and opportunities that exist for the United States as we enter the 21st century as well. These two initiatives address two standards and give the students the opportunity to create an understanding of domestic and foreign policy. The student will be focusing their energy on researching the United States domestic policy as it relates to the ever-changing stance that our government takes on Environmentalism. Their research will begin in the 1970's while they look at the birth of Environmentalism, and it will move chronologically through the next three decades as they look at how different Presidents and different Congresses change our policies concerning the Environment. This is important because it will help to show the students how while we might value the environment during one decade, after a Presidential change, the nation may turn their domestic concerns to other topics. The students will complete this learning objective by creating an interactive timeline and completing a shortened essay in order to tie the information together. From this point, the students will look into the foreign policy and its evolution since the 1970s. Students will be using the information regarding the evolution of foreign policy to then diagnose challenges that the United States may experience, as the 21st century gets under way, and recognize opportunity that exists for the United States as well.

How does this project affect life outside of school?

The student researches the nation's past, recent, and future policy decisions. The student will begin to recognize patterns in policy and notice that much of their life today is influenced by the

decisions made regarding domestic or foreign US policy. As the students are listening to the news after completing this project, it may result in a better understanding of current events. By this point, many high school students have also formulated opinions regarding the environment, and the United States' foreign involvement. Upon completion of this project, students are granted the opportunity to formulate more authoritative, educated opinions regarding the two topics.

What makes this project important to the community or the world around the student?

When individuals are more aware of the political world around them, they are more active citizens and participants in their community. If we as educators are working to develop global citizens and participants, we must provide an opportunity for the student to understand the United States position of policy both historically and currently as well as domestic and foreign.

Questions that the student will be able to answer by doing this project:

- How did domestic policy evolved through the 20 years in question?

- How did foreign policy evolved throughout the 20 years in question?

- In the future, what challenges does United States policy face?

- In the future, what opportunities does the United States policy have for positive change?

Tasks and activities:

Part A: PowerPoint Presentation

- The history of domestic policy slide show:

The PowerPoint will guide the students through the past 40 years and the domestic policy regarding the environment. They will need to create 1-2 slides per decade and explain important policy changes that occurred during that time period. (see student handout attached for further details)

o Time necessary to complete: 120 minutes

Part B: Essay

- Domestic policy essay

The essay will consist of an introduction paragraph, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph. The essay will be spiraling through the slideshow information. They will need to explain how the domestic policy regarding the environment has evolved throughout the last 40 years to begin the essay. They will then

continue to outline the challenges that the United States faces with its environmental policies in the near future. To complete the essay they will synthesize what they believe are opportunities for betterment that the United States has in their near future.(see student handout for further details)

o Time necessary to complete: 45 minutes

Part C: Essay

- Foreign policy essay

This final essay will be three sections. The first section will be explaining foreign policy in each decade. The second section will begin by explaining the evolution of foreign policy through the four decades and end discussing the current foreign policies that the United States is working with. The third section is similar to the essay on domestic policy and they will once again be using three challenges and three opportunities. To conclude the essay, they will choose one of the selected quotes and explain what they believe is better plan for future United States foreign policy. (see student handout for further details)

o Time necessary to complete: 120 minutes

Assessment-Formative

Essay

Lesson Plans 3/12 to 3/15

World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 3/12 to Thursday 3/15

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page.World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 2/20 to Friday 2/23

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page.

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Monday, Mar. 12

 

Description

This lesson will analyze how the two party system has affected American history.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Understand the origins of political parties in the United States.
  2. Identify and describe the three periods of single party domination and describe the current era of divided government.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the Venn graphic organizer in the text, p. 94-102.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

 

2. Bellringer: Students will view the two party symbols in a Thomas Nast Political cartoon and write down the qualities associated with these animals. Discussion will be based on these and what students believe Nast’s purpose was using these two principals.

3. Introduce topic: Analyzing political parties through political cartoons.

4. Students will read Ch. 5 Section 2 and complete the political cartoon worksheet.

5. Students will discuss the last question on the worksheet on the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 might affect party balance and how events such as new technology, major historical events and cultural change can affect attitudes about political parties.

 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the political party worksheet.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Tuesday, Mar. 13

 

Description

This lesson is designed to suffrage rights, voting requirements, and the historical relationship between voting and Civil Rights.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

            7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under

the law.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Examine the reasons for expansion of voting rights.

2. Analyze how voting qualification have changed over time.

3. Identify historical barriers and voter discrimination trends that have affected African-Americans historically.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Organize the class into three groups and assign each group a section from the chapter.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students groups will create a presentation detailing the main points of the section.

3. As the groups give their presentations they will create a study guide on the Smart Board outlining each section’s main points.

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on class presentations

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Wednesday, Mar. 14

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Thursday, Mar.. 15

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 16

 

Description

This lesson the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will complete required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the exam

World History and Government Lesson Plans 2/20 to 2/23

World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 2/20 to Friday 2/23

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page. 

 

 

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 20

 

Description

This lesson will analyze how the two party system has affected American history.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Understand the origins of political parties in the United States.
  2. Identify and describe the three periods of single party domination and describe the current era of divided government.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the Venn graphic organizer in the text, p. 94-102.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

 

2. Bellringer: Students will view the two party symbols in a Thomas Nast Political cartoon and write down the qualities associated with these animals. Discussion will be based on these and what students believe Nast’s purpose was using these two principals.

3. Introduce topic: Analyzing political parties through political cartoons.

4. Students will read Ch. 5 Section 2 and complete the political cartoon worksheet.

5. Students will discuss the last question on the worksheet on the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 might affect party balance and how events such as new technology, major historical events and cultural change can affect attitudes about political parties.

 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the political party worksheet.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 21

 

Description

This lesson is designed to suffrage rights, voting requirements, and the historical relationship between voting and Civil Rights.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

            7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under

the law.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Examine the reasons for expansion of voting rights.

2. Analyze how voting qualification have changed over time.

3. Identify historical barriers and voter discrimination trends that have affected African-Americans historically.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Organize the class into three groups and assign each group a section from the chapter.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students groups will create a presentation detailing the main points of the section.

3. As the groups give their presentations they will create a study guide on the Smart Board outlining each section’s main points.

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on class presentations

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Noble

Thursday, Feb. 23

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 23

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 16

 

Description

This lesson the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will complete required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the exam

World History and Government Lesson Plans 2/06 to 2/09

ThLesson Plans 4/12-4/15

World History The Cold War
Origins

After working together to defeat the Axis Powers in Europe and in the Pacific, relations between the Soviet Union and its western Allies quickly soured. The first cracks in the relationship appeared before the war ended at the Potsdam Conference, where Allied leaders found common ground on the future of Germany but clashed over Soviet demands for friendly "buffer" states between it and its enemy in two devastating world wars. This hairline fracture soon became a gaping chasm as East and West sought to shore up allies, first in Europe and then in Asia, Africa and Latin America. It was, in fact, in the Third World, which was emerging from centuries of European domination, that the Cold War became "hot." Unwilling to risk the nuclear Armageddon that a direct conflict would surely bring, the superpowers instead focused their military efforts on establishing friendly states around the globe. So while the poles of the Cold War were centered in the US and Soviet Union, the magnetic field of the conflict encompassed the entire world. It is this global nature of the conflict that provides the context for the unit's essential question: How did Cold War tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union impact the economic, social and political development of former European colonies in the Third World?

 

 

 

Tuesday and Wednesday

Objectives: 1) Compare and contrast the causes and courses of World Wars I and II; 2) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II; 3) Explain the United States' policy of containment

Class Work: Document-Based Question; paragraph writing; guided reading

 

Thursday

Objectives: 1) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II;

Class Work: Guided note-taking on movie, Atomic Cafe

 

Friday

Objectives: 1) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II; 2) Analyze the role of nuclear weapons in keeping the conflict between the US and USSR "cold"

Class Work: Guided note-taking on movie; Analyze political cartoon

 

Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 6

 

Description

This lesson is designed to examine the formal amendment process for the U.S. Constitution

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 2: The student will describe the historic and philosophical foundations of the United States republican system of government.

            6. Analyze the steps of the constitutional amendment process including examples of recent attempts to amend the United States Constitution as exemplified in the issues of the Equal Rights Amendment and flag desecration.  

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Compare the process of ratification of amendments by studying charts.
  2. Identify the four different ways by which the Constitution may be changed.
  3. Understand that while many amendments have been proposed, only a select group has been ratified.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the graphic organizer in the text, p. 79-83.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Introduction of the topic: the students will be informed that today the class will discuss the formal amendment process. The discussion will center around the following discussion questions; A. What has been the most often used method for ratification and why?  B. How many of the amendments were ratified this way? C. What method was used to ratify the 21st Amendment and why?  D. Describe the other two methods for ratification.  
3. Students will read the section.

4.  Class discussion.

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the class discussion.

 

 

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 7

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how basic legislation has added to our understanding of the Constitution over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the executive and legislative branches have interpreted the Constitution.

3. Analyze the role of party practices and custom in interpreting the Constitution.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will read the section, p. 85-88, then complete the cause and effect chart on p. 85.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will identify and discuss the five methods in which change occurs.

4. Students will hand in their cause and effects charts as an assessment. 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their completion of the graphic organizer on p. 85. This is a two column cause and effect chart that must include separate items for each column.

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Thursday, Feb. 08

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how basic legislation has added to our understanding of the Constitution over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the executive and legislative branches have interpreted the Constitution.

3. Analyze the role of party practices and custom in interpreting the Constitution.

 

 

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will re-read the section, p. 85-88, then finish the cause and effect chart on p. 85.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will identify and discuss the five methods in which change occurs.

4. Students will hand in their cause and effects charts as an assessment. 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their completion of the graphic organizer on p. 85. This is a two column cause and effect chart that must include separate items for each column.

 

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 09

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how federal and state governments interact and share powers over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the Federal and State governments use expressed and implied powers.

 

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will read the section, p. 90-95, then engage in discussion.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will discuss the use of implied and expressed powers at the State and Federal levels.

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their response to discussion questions.

World History and Government Lesson Plans 1/22 to 1/26

World History

World War II

Monday-The Home Front

During World War II African Americans found themselves with conflicting feelings about supporting the war effort when their own country did not offer them the freedom America was fighting for overseas.   The Double Victory - Double V - campaign, begun by the Pittsburgh Courier newspaper in 1942, helped to address this issue.  It encouraged African Americans to participate at every level in winning the war abroad, while simultaneously fighting for their civil rights at home.

Tuesday-Nazism and Fascism

Between 1933 and 1945, Nazi Germany and its collaborators pursued a program to systematically persecute and destroy six million Jews. Nazi ideology identified other enemies; they were targeted for racial, ethnic or political reasons.

During this lesson, high school students will understand the German National Socialism (Nazi) extermination campaign against European Jewry and other targeted groups within the context of World War II history; appraise responses to the Holocaust by governments and individuals; reflect on racism and stereotyping; and reflect on responsibility and remembrance

Wednesday-D Day

General Dwight D. Eisenhower wrote his “order of the day” on D-Day, the Allied invasion of France, which spelled the beginning of the end of the Third Reich and Nazi domination of Europe.  These confident words were given to every person involved in the operation.  However, very few, including Eisenhower himself, had absolute confidence in the mission.  In fact, unknown even to Eisenhower’s inner circle, Ike had already written an announcement the invasion had failed, and that he accepted the blame.

In this lesson, students will investigate the complex aspects of Operation Overlord, including the commanders, geography and history, political, and technological challenges that made this one of the most difficult military operations in history

Thursday and Friday The Pacific War

In this lesson, students will review the historic significance of a controversy involving the Chicago Tribune, which published a series of stories inferring that the US had broken a secret Japanese code, which significantly assisted the US Navy in winning one of the biggest battles of the Pacific Theater of World War II, the Battle of Midway.  Did the Tribune go beyond the First Amendment right of freedom of the press in this instance? 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

1-22-18 to 1-26-18

 

Date: Monday, Tuesday Jan. 22-23

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify and define the basic concepts of democracy.

 

Standards

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

   3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.

   4. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the major ways governmental power is distributed, shared, and structured in unitary, federal, and confederal systems in terms of effectiveness, prevention of abuse of power, and responsiveness to the popular will.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Objectives; Students will-

  1. Identify and explain the five basic concepts of democracy.
  2. Identify real world examples of the five concepts of democracy by brainstorming and completing a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History

2. Bellringer: Students will use a Bellringer worksheet which includes a passage on the Internet and Democracy. Students will read the passage and answer the questions.

3. Students will read Ch. 1 Section 3, pp. 20-24. .

4. Students will complete the graphic organizer on p. 20 and the reading comprehension worksheet handout.

5. Students will share and discuss their answers from the bellringer exercise.
 

 

Assessments-Summative

Students will be assessed through the Understanding of Main Ideas worksheet.

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Wednesday-Friday, 1-24-14 to 1-26-1

 

Description

This lesson is designed to gather required benchmarks and reinforces the previous lesson on the basic concepts of democracy through the use of Jigsaw collaborative learning.

 

Objectives; Students will-

  1. Identify and explain the five basic concepts of democracy.
  2. Identify real world examples of the five concepts of democracy by brainstorming and completing a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

            3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.   

 

Procedures

Quote of the Day and Today in History

  1. Students will be given a short multiple choice test to gather required benchmark data.
  2. The class will be divided into groups and each will be assigned a particular concept of democracy.
  3. Each group will become teaching experts and then will in turn teach the other groups on each concept.

 

Assessment-Formative

Students understanding will be assessed based on a guided discussion on the five concepts of democracy.

World History and Government Lesson Plans 1/16 to 1/19

Class: Periods 2-5                                         Topic:  The Rise of Fascism    

  

 

Tuesday

Political Upheaval in the 1920’s

Instructional Objectives:

Knowledge:

The pupils

  • Students know about the World War 1.
  • Students know about the Triple Alliance.
  • Students know about the Treaty of Versailles

Understanding

The pupils

  • To Understand the Rise of Dictatorship in Italy.
  • To understand the common factors in Italy and Germany, which led to the rise of dictatorship in Italy and Germany?  
  • To understand the cause of the rise of the fascist.                

 Critical Thinking:

The pupils

  • Critically evaluate The rise of Fascism and Nazism and the second world war
  • Critically think about the cause for the rise of Fascism in Italy.

Skill:

The pupils

  • Draw the flow chart on the causes of the rise of fascist dictatorship in Italy.
  • Draw the timeline of the rise of Fascism and its causes.

Teaching Points

 

  1. The rise of dictatorships in Italy.
  2. Mussolini, dictator of Italy brought fascism in Italy.
  3. Fascism and its meaning
  4. Rise of Mussolini.

Map of Political Post war Europe, Picture of prominent leaders, Timeline of rise of Fascism, Diagrammatic Representation.

Tuesday and Wednesday

1924 – THE YEAR THAT MADE HITLER

Objective: To have students analyze, evaluate the rise of Hitler through sourcing and annotating complex text reading. 

Vocabulary: Mein Kampf, Anti-Semitic, High Treason, Nationalistic, Antiparliamentarian, The Blood and The Fist, Swastika, Volkisch

Bellringer-Quotation Interpretation:

“How it happened that Hitler came to power is still the most important question of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century German history, if not all of German history.”

                                                               -Heinrich August Winkler, Historian, 2000

 

How did Hitler come to power?

WARM UP:   Above

 

INTRODUCTION:  Adolf Hitler spent 1924 behind bars, convicted of treason after an unsuccessful coup against the unstable postwar German government.  It was a year of deep reading and intensive writing, or passionate courtroom speeches, of proselytizing to his fellow inmates, and of working feverishly on Mein Kampf.  It was, in many ways, the year that made Hitler an explosively powerful political force.  Everything that would come – the rallies and riots, the single-minded deployment of a catastrophically evil idea – crystallized in this one defining year.

 

ACTIVITY

 

Part 1 – Claim, Evidence and Reasoning –

 

Author’s Claim:  1924 was the year that made Hitler

 

 Students will prove or disprove using text. 

 

Part 2 – Share Out Discussion -

 

Critical Thinking Questions –

 

How was media influential in Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How was the judiciary influential Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How did popular opinion influence Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How did imprisonment act as a haven for Hitler’s “hate ideology’?

 

To what do you attribute the recent rise in anti-Semitic fervor in the United States?

 

 

 

 

Summary &

Assessment:

 

 

 

Text Message:  Similar to a sentence summary, students will write a summary of the key learning in text message format.

 

 

Thursday and Friday

 

Lesson and Question:

HOW CAN WE AVOID THE TRAP OF TYRANNY THAT SURVIVES IN THE REALM OF “ISMS”?

   

Concept Terminology:

Tyranny, Fascism, Nazism, Communism, Marxism, Terrorism, Capitalism, Rule-of-Law, Oligarchy, Paramilitary, Great Terror, Einsatzgruppen, The Great Action, Fahrenheit 451, Orwell 1984, Vaclav Havel, Post-Truth, Solidary Labor Movement, Totalitarianism, Authoritarianism, Intellectual Property, Extremism, Perpetual State of Emergency, Reichstag Fire, Historical Generation

   

 

Warm Up:

 

 

VIDEO – On Tyranny:  Lessons From the 20th Century – Author Interview – Timothy Snyder at the Wilson Center  (11:16 mins)

 

https://youtu.be/A7RBWea31e8

 

According to author, what are the “isms” associated with Tyranny?

 

Quotation Interpretation:  “We don’t recognize history until it knocks on our door” – Timothy Snyder

 

Do you agree/disagree?  Be specific with your response.

 

Lesson Procedure:

 

 

 

WARM UP:   Above

 

INTRODUCTION:  Timothy Snyder gives us a new translation and interpretation to historical experiences, including Nazism, Fascism, Communism and Terrorism as precursors to Tyranny focusing on our need to recognize the structures of disaster as they unfold, as well as society stopping and thinking before we accept a new reality or ideology.  Tyrants are known to crafting alternative realities that people have readily adopted rather than questioned.

 

ACTIVITY

 

Students will analyze, evaluate, annotate and synthesize excerpted secondary source based on Timothy Snyder’s book entitled On Tyranny:  Lessons From the 20th Century using Silent Sustainable Reading Strategy.  Students will formulate a THESIS and support with evidence from the text.  Upon completion they will engage in a Conversation With Yourself  before Turn and Talk to discuss the following

Critical Thinking Questions in a Share Out format:

 

According to the author:

 

  1. How did tyrannical behavior unfold during Nazi Germany and during the Russian Revolution?  Cite evidence from the text.
  2. How can media or collective memory craft alternative realities?
  3. Should people “stop and think” and question new ideologies before blindly accepting them as truth?
  4. If we are to formulate a historical generation, how do we recognize the signs of impending tyranny as vigilant citizens?

 

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Periods-4, Monday-Friday, 1-16-18 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Monday

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify, compare, and contrast differing forms of government in the world today.

 

Standards

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

           

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Preparations

Prepare information using examples of different governments throughout the world for comparisons. MacGruder's American Government by Prentice Hall. Have students read Chapter 1 Section 2,pp. 12-18, followed by a formmative assessment (Forms of government and concepts of democracy).

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History

2. Bellringer: Students will copy a list from the Smart Board; direct democracy, indirect democracy, dictatorship, unitary government, federal government, confederation, presidential government, and parliamentary government. They will then circle each term that describes the U.S. government, then define each circled term.

3. Students will share and discuss their classifications that define The U.S. government.

4. Students will read pp. 12-14 on Participation and participate in Guided Discussion
5. FORMS OF GOVERNMENT-- Guided Discussion-(Where is the Power?)--UNITARY- a centralized government where all powers held by the government belong to a single, central agency. (Most gov'ts are unitary in form) Federal government-one in which the powers of government are divided between a central government and several local governments. CONFEDERATE GOV'T-an alliance of independent states. Most power is held by independent states leaving the central government weak. Explain the relationship between legislative & executive agencies--Presidential: separation of powers between the legislative and executive branches of government. Parliamentary: Executive is made up of the prime minister or premier and that of officials’ cabinet. They themselves are members of the legislative branch, the parliament. Dictatorship exists where those who rule cannot be held responsible to the will of the people.-dictatorship is probably the oldest & most common form of government known..

6. Discuss dictatorships based on the following; Why do dictatorships tend to endure for decades?  Why do dictatorships tend to go hand in hand with military power? What circumstances are likely to create a dictatorship?

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be based on a class discussion on why Dictatorships adopt some form of democratic governments, such as popular election and elected legislative bodies?

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Periods-4, Monday-Friday, 1-1618 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Tuesday and Wednesday

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify, compare, and contrast differing forms of government in the world today.

 

Objectives

  1. Students will compare and contrast democracies and dictatorships by predicting their responses in different situations.
  2. Classify governments according to three sets of characteristics.

3. Define governments based on who can participate

 

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

CS 1.2. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics

 

Preparations

Prepare information using examples of different governments throughout the world for comparisons. MacGruder's American Government by Prentice Hall. Have students read Chapter 1 Section 2,pp. 12-18, followed by a formative assessment (Forms of government and concepts of democracy).

 

 

Procedures

Students will be given a reading comprehension worksheet to complete. The students will read Ch. 1 Section 2, pp. 12-18. Students will complete the worksheet and then as a separate assignment answer the Section 2 Assessment questions #2, #3, and #5.

 

Assessment-Summative

Students understanding will be assessed based on the Reading Comprehension Worksheet and the Section assessment questions on p. 18.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 1-18-18 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Thursday and Friday

 

Description

This lesson will identify and explain the five concepts of democracy by using a graphic organizer and teach students to identify real-world examples of the five concepts.

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

CS 1.2. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics.        

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Identify and explain the five concepts of democracy by completing a graphic organizer.
  2. Identify real world examples by brainstorming and filling out a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Preparation

Assign Chapter 1 Section 3, pp. 20-24 and the graphic organizer in the text.

 

 

Procedure

Today in History and Quote of the Day

  1. Following the reading and completion of the students’ graphic organizers have volunteers provide definitions and express what each concept means to them.
  2. Ask the students what the term Free Enterprise means to them.
  3. Extend the discussion by asking the students the following questions; Why might going to school be a duty instead of a responsibility? Should volunteering be a duty rather than a responsibility? What would be the benefits of making voting a duty? What might happen if serving on a jury was a responsibility rather than a duty?

 

Assessment-Summative and Formative

Students graphic organizers 

Sectionalism and Civil War

World History Lesson Plans

Monday-Thursday 11/13 to 11/17

 

Lesson Plans 10/23 to 10/27

World History

Monday-Wednesday

Inventors of the Industrial Revolution

Interactive Powerepoint presentation

Have students complete the Inventor Chart and also require that they write questions they would like to know more about---one for each invention category. Do NOT have them take the quiz right away. Reconvene the class to share these questions for discussion and clarification purposes. Then have students return to the laptops for the quiz.

As a class discussion and lesson, have each student hypothesize what would have happened without a certain inventor by “subtracting” from the classroom, describing of things we use today traced back to the Industrial Revolution. For example, Betty says, “I subtract everything woven. We would all be wearing handwoven or hand-knit clothing if it weren’t for the Power Loom. If the class is split into two teams, they can earn points and compete by coming up with valid ideas.

  • Since the activities will take more than one class day- possibly as many as 3 or 4- have students recall something about each invention group from the day before to “earn” the right to be Vanna… or let the class play “stump Vanna” with invention questions from the previous days to remove the board operator and replace him/her. It is sometimes very helpful to have your most active and disruptive student operate the board because it keeps him/her on task and focused.
  •  
World History Lesson Plans 8/28 to 9/1

  Monday and Tuesday

 

Islamic Contributions to the World

 

 

Drinking industry and Distilled liquids

It was Muslim chemists who first invented pure distillation processes, which could fully purify chemical substances.
Purified distilled alcohol by Jabir ibn Hayyan in the 8th century

 

Hygiene industries

True soap made of vegetable oils (such as olive oil) or with

aromatics (such as thyme oil)were invented by al-Razi Rhazes.  Perfumed and colored soaps and liquid and solid soaps were also invented by Muslim chemists as well.

 

Islamic Astronomy: Astronomical instruments

Muslim astronomers developed a number of astronomical instruments, These instruments were used by Muslims for a variety of purposes related to astronomy, astrology, horoscopes, navigation, surveying, and timekeeping.

 

Analog Machines (or Computers)

The Plate of Conjunctions, a computing instrument used to determine the time of day invented by al-Kashi in the 15th century. A mechanical planetary computer called the Plate of Zones could predict the true positions in longitude of the Sun and Moon, and the planets in terms of elliptical orbits.

 

Parachute

In 9th century Islamic Spain, Abbas Ibn Firnas (Armen Firnas) invented a primitive version of the parachute and the hand glider.

 

Camera

Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen), the "father of optics" and pioneer of the modern scientific method, invented the camera obscura and pinhole camera.He was the first person to realize that rays of light enters the eye, rather than leaving it, The word "camera" comes from the Arabic word qamara for a dark or private room. Ibn al-Haytham first described pinhole camera after noticing the way light came through a hole in window shutters.

 

Chemical technology

Jabir ibn Hayyan (Geber), the father of chemistry, invented the alembic still and many chemicals, including distilled alcohol, and established the perfume industry.

 

Street lighting and litter collection facilities

The first street lamps were built in the Arab Empire, especially in Cordoba, which also had the first facilities and waste containers for litter collection.

 

Clock technology



Astronomical clocks
Muslim astronomers and engineers constructed a variety of highly accurate astronomical clocks for use in their observatories.

 

Mechanical clocks

The first mechanical clocks driven by weights, and gears and were invented by Muslim engineers. The first geared mechanical clocks were invented by the 11th century Arab engineer Ibn Khalaf al-Muradi from Islamic Spain.

 

Paper mill

Paper was introduced to the Muslim world by Chinese prisoners after the Battle of Talas. Muslims made several improvements to papermaking and built the first paper mills in Baghdad, Iraq, as early as 794.

 

Sugar refinery

The first sugar refineries were built by Muslim engineers. They were first driven by water mills, and then windmills from the 9th and 10th centuries in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iran.

 

Fountain pen

The earliest historical record of a reservoir fountain pen dates back to the 10th century. In 953, Ma'ad al-Mu'izz, the caliph of Egypt, demanded a pen, which would not stain his hands or clothes, and was provided with a pen, which held ink in a reservoir.

 

On/off switch

The on and off switch was invented by Muslim engineers between the 9th and 12th centuries. It was employed in a variety of automatic and water clocks. The mechanism later had an influence on the development of the electric on/off switch, which appeared in the 1950s

 

Medical Technology

Muslim physicians pioneered a number of medical treatments, including: Tracheotomy by Ibn Zuhr in the 12th century. Muslim anesthesiologist invented inoculations, modern oral and inhalant anesthesia as well as the first smallpox vaccine in the form of cowpox. At least 2,000 medicinal substances were invented by Muslim technology.

 

Medical university and public hospital

The Islamic hospital-universities were the first free public hospitals, the first medical schools, and the first universities to issue diplomas. The first of these institutions was opened in Baghdad. They then appeared in Egypt from 872 and then in Islamic Spain, Persia and the Maghreb thereafter. Physicians and surgeons at Islamic hospital-universities gave lectures to medical students and a diploma would be issued to any student who completed his/her education and was qualified to be a doctor of Medicine.

 

Military technology

After the spread of early gunpowder from China to the Muslim world, Muslim chemists and engineers developed compositions for explosive gunpowder and their own weapons for use in gunpowder warfare.

 

Hand cannon, handgun, portable firearms

The first portable hand cannons (midfa) loaded with explosive gunpowder, the first example of a handgun and portable firearms were used by the Egyptians to repel the Mongols at the Battle of Ain Jalut in 1260, and again in 1304. 

 

Wednesday and Thursday

THE ENLIGHTENMENT  

Until the late 1700’s, people of France accepted the fact that their king ruled by divine right, that Church teachings were correct, and that well-to-do nobles had privileges not enjoyed by the poor. But by the end of the century, Frenchmen no longer accepted these beliefs. This change in attitude came about as the result of writings by a group know as the ‘philisophes’. The philisophes were intelligent, reasonable men who felt there was much about life in Europe that was unfair and unjust. Since most philosophes were from France and since France was ruled by an absolute monarchy surrounded by a privileged nobility, the French way of life came under particular attack. The chart which follows lists four leading thinkers of the 1700’s. They published writings during a perid called the Age of Reason, or Enlightenment. Many ideas from the Enlightenment were eventually adopted by countries in Europe and around the world. Ideas even spread to the United States and are today a part of our way of life. Read each statement by the philisophes given on the chart and decide whether the statement is a true description of present American life. If it is true of the United States today, fill in the space with yes. If the ideas or attitude is not true of present life in the U.S., put no in the space. 

The philisophes were intelligent, reasonable men who felt there was much about life in Europe that was unfair and unjust. Since most philosophes were from France and since France was ruled by an absolute monarchy surrounded by a privileged nobility, the French way of life came under particular attack. The chart which follows lists four leading thinkers of the 1700’s. They published writings during a perid called the Age of Reason, or Enlightenment. Many ideas from the Enlightenment were eventually adopted by countries in Europe and around the world. Ideas even spread to the United States and are today a part of our way of life. Read each statement by the philisophes given on the chart and decide whether the statement is a true description of present American life. If it is true of the United States today, fill in the space with yes. If the ideas or attitude is not true of present life in the U.S., put no in the space. 

John Locke 1. All men are free and equal at birth. 2. Everyone has the right to life liberty, & property. 3. Citizens have the right to overthrow the government when their natural rights are violated. 4. Rulers receive the right to govern from the people and unfair rulers can be forced from power. 5. Man is not born to be a good or evil person – he is made one way or other by his life experiences and society around him. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ Baron de Montesquieu 1. An absolute ruler in an  Baron de Montesquieu 1. An absolute ruler in an undesirable leader because one-man rule limits basic freedoms such as speech, press, and religion. 2. There should be a ‘separation of powers’ in government between legislative, executive and judicial. 3. Slavery, torture, religious persecution, and censorship are all wrong. 4. A man is innocent until proven guilty. 5. When one country increases its military power, so do other countries; therefore all nations should limit their military strength in order to reduce the chances of war. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______   

Voltaire 1. A man should not be persecuted because of his religious beliefs. 2. Religious myths and ceremonies do nothing to make men better and should therefore be ignored. 3. Clergymen are more interested in increasing the power of the Church that they are in making man better. 4. A scientist is a greater person then a conquering general. 5. All men should be treated as equals and should have freedom of the speech and of the press. 6. Democracy is not a good form of government because the common people are not capable of governing themselves; the best government is one headed by a good and fair king. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ 6. _______ 

Rousseau 1. It is unfair that some people are rich while other people are poor. 2. The rich should not enjoy special privileges. 3. Compared to man during the Stone Age, modern man is unhappy, insecure, and greedy. 4. Social and political reforms must be made before man can be a good person. 5. Democracy is a good form of government. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ 

QUESTIONS: 1. In the philosophes were alive today, do you think they would be generally satisfied or dissatisfied with social conditions and the type of government we have today. EXPLAIN! _______________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ 2. Which three statements by the philosophes do you believe are of the greatest importance to mankind? a. ___________________________________________________________________ b. ___________________________________________________________________ c. ___________________________________________________________________

 

  3. Choose one of the statements and tell why you disagree with it. a. Statement: __________________________________________________________ b. Reason for disagreement ________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 4. Not all the philosophes held the same beliefs, but most agreed that: a. Reason should be used at all times b. The search for new knowledge and ideas should continue c. Improvements must be made in the system of justice to end unfair jail sentences, the torture of prisoners, and terrible conditions in prisons. d. Slavery and warfare should be done away with e. Freedom of religion, speech and press must be given to all f. Everyone should enjoy liberty and equality. g. There should be public education for all, not just schools for children of the wealthy.  

Bill Nobles Lesson Plans World History

Lesson Plans 05/07 to 05/11

Objectives

World History Monday and Tuesday       Regional Conflict

Students will

  • research the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and
  • answer questions from textbook on Israeli or a Palestinian issues.

Materials

 

  • Print resources about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
  • Paper, pens

Procedures

  1. Discuss the background of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict featured in the video. These questions will help focus the discussion:
    • Who is involved in this conflict?
    • What region is at the heart of the conflict? Describe the claim that both groups have on this region.
    • What is Israel? When was it founded and by whom?
    • What is the Zionist Movement?
    • Describe the role of the U.S. in the establishment of Israel, a Jewish state.
    • How did the Holocaust affect the formation of a Jewish homeland?
    • What is the PLO? Whom does it represent?
    • Which nations are opposed to a Jewish state? (Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and Egypt)
    • What was the intifada? Who was involved and what caused it?
    • What caused the rise of militant Islam? What is its link to modern terrorism?
    • What is Hamas
  1. After students have completed their research, have them write a personal account, such as a letter or journal entry, from the point of view of an Israeli or Palestinian student. The accounts can be written in the present day or in the past, but they must reflect a major event in the history of the conflict and they should include several details based on research. Challenge students to consider how it must feel to live in the midst of such a conflict.
  2. Have students work in pairs to critique each other's work. Was the account believable? Was it clear when and by whom it was supposed to be written? Did the account include relevant facts based on research? Did it reflect how a young person might feel living in the midst of conflict? Students should revise their writing based on the critique.
  3. Collect the accounts and make copies for everyone in the class. As a homework assignment, have students read the accounts and come prepared to discuss them the next day.

To conclude the lesson, lead a discussion about the accounts. How did students imagine it would feel to be involved in such a conflict? Did they imagine differences between Palestinian and Israeli students? How might their experiences be similar? What was most challenging about writing this assignment? Do students think it is difficult for most Americans to understand the emotions behind the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? Why or why not?

World History Wednesday through Friday

Regional Conflict continued

Background on the Conflict Over KashmiThe Problem: Both India and Pakistan wish to control Kashmir.

Why do both India and Pakistan believe control of Kashmir is so important? The people of Kashmir are still tribal in nature. The geography is mostly rural, with fierce mountains, deserts, and valleys. Industry is undeveloped. If this region has natural resources such as oil or gold or silver in any quantity, this has not yet been discovered. Why the fuss

Background on the Conflict Over KashmirThe Problem: Both India and Pakistan wish to control Kashmir.Why do both India and Pakistan believe control of Kashmir is so important? The people of Kashmir are still tribal in nature. The geography is mostly rural, with fierce mountains, deserts, and valleys. Industry is undeveloped. If this region has natural resources such as oil or gold or silver in any quantity, this has not yet been discovered. Why the fuss?

  1. Control of the Indus River. The headwaters of the Indus River are located in Kashmir. Whomever controls the headwaters, controls the river. The Indus is vital. It brings green fertile life wherever it flows. The Indus begins in Kashmir, then flows through Pakistan, then flows into mainland India. If India chose, since Kashmir is part of India, they could dam the Indus and change the flow of the river. Without fertile land to grow crops, Pakistan would become a desert and its people would starve. Pakistan does not trust India, nor does India trust Pakistan. They will not share control of the Indus. They both want total control.

  2. Religious Sites. Both Pakistan and India have sites in Kashmir that are important to their respective religions.
    * Pakistan is predominately Muslim. Kashmir is predominately Muslim.
    * India is predominately Hindu.

  3. Strategic Location. For India, Kashmir acts as a buffer. For Pakistan, Kashmir offers a fertile roadway into India for possible invasion.

 

Who controls Kashmir today, and why? Approximately sixty years ago, Kashmir was offered a choice by the UN of becoming part of India, part of Pakistan, or becoming independent. To secure Kashmir for Pakistan, in what Muslim forces perceived to be a holy war, Pakistan invaded Kashmir. The ruler of Kashmir fled to India and agreed to place Kashmir under Indian rule if India would protect Kashmir from invasion. If there had been a vote in Kashmir, a vote by the people, the majority probably would have voted to become part of Pakistan for religious reasons. Since there was no vote, Pakistan has never accepted India's control of Kashmir. Pakistan believed then and still believes today that Kashmir should be part of Pakistan. However, for many years now, Kashmir has been part of India, just as Hawaii and California and Alaska are part of the United States.

The people of Kashmir have the same rights as any citizen in India. They have excellent schools. They have television. They have computer access just like the rest of India. Kashmir is predominately Muslim. Muslims only believe in Islamic learnings. Thus, although the people of Kashmir do not always use the benefits available to them, they are available.

 

War & Terrorism: Both India and Pakistan are convinced that they are right and that they will prevail if they continue their fight as they are doing, although this plan has not worked in six decades. In the past 60 years, Pakistan and India have fought three wars over ownership of Kashmir. India won all three. Today, the fight continues with acts of terrorism. The people of Kashmir are probably wondering why the UN won't help them and why the US won't help them. Why must they live with war and terror and what can be done?

Why doesn't the US lend a helping hand with the Kashmir conflict? The US wants to be friends with both Pakistan and India. That makes US involvement in this problem very difficult. On one hand, we have a treaty with Pakistan that says if they go to war with anyone, we will help them. We will honor that treaty. Pakistan shares a border with Afganistan. In our fight on terrorism, that border is most important, and Pakistan's help is critical. On the other hand, we don't want India mad at us. We do a great deal of trade with India that is mutually advantageous. But mostly, India is our friend. If Pakistan goes to war with India, we would have a really tough time with that. So, we try very hard not to get involved. We couldn't win.

When your students come up with any or all of the following solutions, here are some roadblocks you can use.

  • Student Suggestion: Maybe Pakistan could buy Kashmir.
    Teacher Response: It's not about money, although perhaps it's about something money could buy - food. India has the 2nd largest population in the world. They are very crowded. Kashmir has fertile valleys that could produce a lot of food. At the moment they're not producing a lot of food, but they could. India's planners see this potential and want it to feed their population. India is not about to sell or to give away Kashmir. They need it.

  • Student Suggestion: Maybe all the Muslims could move to Pakistan or the Hindus and Sikhs could move to mainland India.
    Teacher Response: People don't want to give up the homes they have lived in for thousands of years. Their life is there. If you try to make them move, you'll start a rein of terror instead of ending one.

  • Student Suggestion: How about a shared government?
    Teacher Response: Pakistan, of course, wants to protect their country and their people. But India refuses to share control of the Indus or of Kashmir.

  • Student Suggestion: How about an Independent Kashmir? Or better yet, let the people decide.
    Teacher Response: Great. Let's ask the people of Kashmir what they want. (Teacher represents the people of Kashmir.) You would probably start a civil war, whatever the outcome of the vote. And if the US helped to set up a vote, the US would risk insulting our good friend India and our good friend Pakistan, which is something the US is not eager to do. But it's a mute point. India is not about to give up Kashmir.

At this point, your students will probably be pretty much convinced that the problem is India. India is not willing to share, thus they are the culprit. When your students say so, which they will, then bring up examples of what the US government has and would do in similar situations in the US.

  • Say: The US fought a Civil War (Northern War of Aggression, War Between the States) when the south wanted to set up their own country. The south had the food. The north had the industry. You need both to be strong. The US did not allow the south to leave, just as India will not allow Kashmir to leave.

  • Ask: What if Canada announced that they wanted Alaska to be part of Canada because they wanted to control the oil Alaska produces? Would the US say - look at the geography. That's so sensible. (No way.)

  • Ask: What if the residents of San Diego, a major seaport in California, voted to become part of Mexico by an overwhelming 80% majority? Would the US government say okay? (No way.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Monday

Issues of Our Time

Objectives

l Students will examine the debate on the size of government using the question of the extent of the government’s involvement in education.

Overview/Materials Pacing

Standard

Block

 

Take a Poll

Description

Ask: What level of government should be responsible for the quality of your education?

(a) federal (b) State (c) local (d) none of these

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Summarize the Issue

Description

Have students read the feature and summarize the issue and the views

expressed in the quotes. L2 ELL Differentiate Write these terms and

definitions on the board: accountable ( responsible), curriculum (the course of study in a school), mandate (an order or command), accessible (that can be approached).

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Description

Since the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002, there has been continuing debate on the program’s value. Display Transparency 15H, No Child Left Behind. Supporters claim that it makes schools accountable for the quality of their education, while critics state that it promotes lower achievement goals. The program has also revived the debate on whether the Federal

Government is interfering in a realm that should be a State and local responsibility.

Ask: Should the Federal Government control the quality of our education system?

(yes: because education affects the nation’s competitive edge; no: because federal funding to states should not be tied to students’ test results) Does this program overstep the scope of National Government? (Answers will vary.) Then take another poll using the question at the beginning of the lesson. If students have changed their

stance, ask why.

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

 

Assessments-Formative

Informal assessment through discussion questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Tuesday

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Wednesday

Issues of Our Time

Objectives

l Students will examine the debate on the size of government using the question of the extent of the government’s involvement in education.

Take a Poll

Description

Ask: What level of government should be responsible for the quality of your education?

(a) federal (b) State (c) local (d) none of these

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Summarize the Issue

Description

Have students read the feature and summarize the issue and the views

expressed in the quotes. L2 ELL Differentiate Write these terms and

definitions on the board: accountable ( responsible), curriculum (the course of study in a school), mandate (an order or command), accessible (that can be approached).

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Description

Since the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002, there has been continuing debate on the program’s value. Display Transparency 15H, No Child Left Behind. Supporters claim that it makes schools accountable for the quality of their education, while critics state that it promotes lower achievement goals. The program has also revived the debate on whether the Federal

Government is interfering in a realm that should be a State and local responsibility.

Ask: Should the Federal Government control the quality of our education system?

(yes: because education affects the nation’s competitive edge; no: because federal funding to states should not be tied to students’ test results) Does this program overstep the scope of National Government? (Answers will vary.) Then take another poll using the question at the beginning of the lesson. If students have changed their stance, ask why.

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

 

Assessments-Formative

Informal assessment through discussion questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Thursday

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Friday

Issues of Our Time

Objectives

l Students will examine the debate on the size of government using the question of the extent of the government’s involvement in education

Take a Poll

Description

Ask: What level of government should be responsible for the quality of your education?

(a) federal (b) State (c) local (d) none of these

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Summarize the Issue

Description

Have students read the feature and summarize the issue and the views

expressed in the quotes. L2 ELL Differentiate Write these terms and

definitions on the board: accountable ( responsible), curriculum (the course of study in a school), mandate (an order or command), accessible (that can be approached).

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Description

Since the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002, there has been continuing debate on the program’s value. Display Transparency 15H, No Child Left Behind. Supporters claim that it makes schools accountable for the quality of their education, while critics state that it promotes lower achievement goals. The program has also revived the debate on whether the Federal

Government is interfering in a realm that should be a State and local responsibility.

Ask: Should the Federal Government control the quality of our education system?

(yes: because education affects the nation’s competitive edge; no: because federal funding to states should not be tied to students’ test results) Does this program overstep the scope of National Government? (Answers will vary.) Then take another poll using the question at the beginning of the lesson. If students have changed their

stance, ask why.

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Assessments-Formative

Informal assessment through discussion questions.

 

 

 

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plans W. Hist and Gov't 4/30 to 5/04

Lesson Plans W. History

Monday

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Tuesday

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Wednesday-Friday

\Defining The term Poor in  a global context

  • entrepreneurship
  • rule of law
  • incentives
  • property rights
  • limited government

NATIONAL VOLUNTARY CONTENT STANDARDS IN ECONOMICSThe background materials and student activities in lesson 1, part 2 address parts of the following national voluntary content standards and benchmarks in economics. Students will learn that:

Standard 4: People respond predictably to positive and negative incentives.

  • Acting as consumers, producers, workers, savers, investors, and citizens, people respond to incentives in order to allocate their scarce resources in ways that provide the highest possible returns to them.

Standard 10: Institutions evolve in market economies to help individuals and groups accomplish their goals. Banks, labor unions, corporations, legal systems, and not-for-profit organizations are examples of important institutions. A different kind of institution, clearly defined and well-enforced property rights, is essential to a market economy.

  • Property rights, contract enforcement, standards for weights and measures, and liability rules affect incentives for people to produce and exchange goods and services.

INTRODUCTION AND LESSON THEME

The prevailing image of a “capitalist” may be an American businessman, but a survey of the world’s economies reveals that, like poverty, capitalism has many faces. “Capitalist” is used, in either praise or condemnation, to label many nations, and the label is claimed –whether deservedly or not – by many more. To begin a systematic analysis of whether capitalism is good for the poor requires a working agreement on just exactly what capitalism is.

In the last half of the 20th century, courses in “comparative systems” were found in many universities, and high school textbooks routinely had chapters bearing that title. The content typically consisted of comparing and contrasting capitalism, communism, socialism, and, occasionally, fascism, each of which was conceived of as a discrete entity or “system.” Unfortunately, the usefulness of the paradigm decayed in the face of the persistence with which actual economies crossed the lines between systems.

For example, the standard textbook definition of capitalism as “a market economy in which the means of production are privately owned,” raises more questions than it answers:

  • Must ALL production be private?
  • Is the United States truly a capitalist economy when mass transit services in most cities are publicly funded, and 1st-class mail is delivered by the federal government?
  • How could the Soviet Union have been considered truly “communist,” when peasant farmers were allowed to sell their garden produce in open markets?

Additionally, the traditional conception of “systems” was unwieldy because it incorporated the political and governmental characteristics of nations, often without specifically addressing how those characteristics altered economic institutions.

Using an institutional definition of capitalism allows us to avoid the problems of a one-size-fits-all definition. Using the framework of institutional economics, developed by Nobel laureate and economic historian, Douglass North, allows us to identify specific institutional components of capitalism and to analyze their characteristics in particular times and places.

We begin, therefore, by asserting that capitalist economies share an identifying set of institutions, whose different manifestations in practice have a similar foundation. While it may take some careful looking to see the similarities underneath the striking differences between such places as China and the Netherlands, the United States and Uganda, or India and Argentina, these similarities do exist.

The hallmark of capitalism is the existence of a particular set of institutions governing the production and exchange of goods and services. Elements of capitalism are found in almost all nations, but the forms and degrees of capitalism vary widely.

As in part 1, the purpose of this background outline is to set the stage for the investigation by creating a common vocabulary to facilitate future discussion of poverty and capitalism.

KEY POINTS

  1. Overview: In addition to U.S. capitalism, other current and recent forms include:
    • Chinese (communist) capitalism
    • western European capitalism
    • former-Soviet republics capitalism
    • African (dictator-based) capitalism
    • The different forms share similarities and manifest significant differences.
      • Capitalist economies share a set of key institutions. However, the characteristics of the shared institutions vary greatly from one capitalist country to the next
      • In their differences lies the explanation for their differing levels of success in reducing poverty.
  2. Key terms and concepts:
    • Institutions are the established behavior practices and patterns upon which the life of a community is built. Nobel laureate and economic historian Douglass North calls them “the rules of the game.” They are fixtures of people’s interactions with one another.
      • Formal institutions, like constitutions and statutory law, codify the rules under which the members of the economy interact.
      • Informal institutions and expectations of behavior are at least as important as formal institutions.
        • Doug North argues, in fact, that informal institutions may exert even more influence over behavior than formal laws. Laws may have little ability to shape behavior if they do not match up with informal but ingrained cultural and social norms.
        • Additionally, while formal laws may be changed at any time, informal institutional arrangements tend to be persistent and change very slowly.
    • Institutions influence behavior by shaping incentives.
    • Incentives are rewards and punishments for behavior.
    • Economists have long recognized that people react to incentives in predictable ways. Incentives, rather than nebulous forces like “national character,” explain observable patterns of economic decision-making.
      • North argued, by way of illustration, that if a nation’s institutions rewarded piracy, for example, then its people would face incentives to become pirates – and would do so in greater numbers than in nations without such incentives, regardless of their cultural background.
      • He also argued that institutions are not neutral: that different institutional forms may give advantages to different groups. Because that is the case, the “players” in the economy realize that changing the rules can give them an advantage, and thus they will devote resources to effect those changes.
        • Organizations such as political parties, companies, trade unions, and bureaucracies want to survive and benefit in a given institutional setting, so they will invest in trying to change the rules to increase the benefits they receive from the system. (Grossman)
        • In this sense, we must recognize that economic institutions are not immune to politics. Although Is Capitalism Good for the Poor?concentrates on the functioning of economic institutions, it is important to remember that economic institutions do not operate independently and that they are always constrained, to a greater or lesser degree, by political and governmental institutions.
  3. The common set of institutions shared by capitalist economies is:
    1. markets – institutions governing voluntary exchange;
    2. entrepreneurship – institutions governing risks and rewards of organizing resources for production;
    3. property rights – institutions governing the ownership, use and transfer of private property; and
    4. the rule of law – the extent and limits of authority and privilege.
    • The characteristics of these institutions vary greatly from country to country.
      • The result is a broad spectrum of “capitalist” practices, some empowering the poor, and some holding them back.
  4. Analogy: Institutions are the threads in a nation’s “social fabric.”
    • Like cloth fabrics, a social fabric is constructed of interwoven threads. Cloth threads are cotton, linen, wool, or synthetics; the threads from which a “social fabric” is woven are institutions.
    • This analogy also helps us to explain the variety in capitalist economies. Consider that even cloth fabrics made from only one type of thread may look and feel different. Cotton thread may be spun in different ways – bulky, thin, smooth, or rough – and the resulting cloth has a distinctive look and feel.
      • Similarly, any single capitalist institution (markets, private property, rule of law, or entrepreneurship) may take on various forms, depending on factors such as the culture, government, and history of the nation.
        • Markets, for example, differ in the extent of regulation and openness.
          • At one end of the spectrum are Hong Kong’s virtually unregulated markets, which provide almost all goods and services.
          • In Western Europe, markets provide most products, but the government provides health care, and many forms of communication and transportation.
          • At the other end of the spectrum, China’s markets provide few products; they are restricted to agriculture and a few government-selected manufactured goods.
  5. The historical record shows that the success with which a capitalist economy deals with poverty depends on the institutional forms it adopts. Some forms of capitalism have successfully generated the economic progress that alleviates poverty. Others have failed to do so.
    • In successful capitalist nations, the institutional threads have the following distinctive characteristics:
      1. Property rights are clearly defined and secured.
        • The definition of property rights includes individuals’ rights to self (labor) and possessions
      2. The rule of law prevails within a framework of limited government
        • Note that just having democratic political institutions is notsufficient to satisfy this requirement.
      3. Markets are open and competitive.
        • Competitive interaction creates an ethic in which individuals’ choices have consequences.
      4. Entrepreneurship is fostered by incentives to invent, innovate and produce.

CONCLUSION

The student activity “Will the Real Capitalism Please Stand Up?” is a small-group discussion exercise to familiarize students with the range of capitalist economies, and to give them practice in identifying the institutions – markets, entrepreneurship, property rights, and rule of law – that form the foundation of capitalism.

The next 4 lessons in Is Capitalism Good for the Poor? investigate the operation of the distinctive capitalist institutions found in nations experiencing economic growth:

  • Lesson 2: Property Rights and the Rule of Law
  • Lesson 3: Beneficiaries of Competition
  • Lesson 4: How Incentives Affect Innovation
  • Lesson 5: Character Values and Capitalism.

Together, the lessons teach students to use the tools of economic reasoning to evaluate the relationship between capitalism and poverty. The lessons address the prevailing belief that capitalism oppresses the poor and reserves its benefits for the rich. They provide the data and analytical tools for students and teachers to draw their own conclusions and to answer for themselves the question, Is Capitalism Good for the Poor?

 

 

Lesson Plans    Government

Economic Systems

traditional, market, command, and mixed economies

 

 

Grade Level and Course:

10th Grade  Government – 48 minute class periods

 

District Standards:

Analyze and compare traditional, market, command, and mixed economies as organizing systems for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. (OK 4.1.1)

 

NCSS and/or Common Core Standards:

NCSS VII. PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND CONSUMPTION

Have learners compare basic economic systems according to how they deal with demand, supply, prices, the role of government, banks, labor and labor unions, savings and investments, and capital;

 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.

 

Essential Question:

What are the different kinds of economic systems?

 

Learning Objectives:

            Substantive: Students will/will be able to…

  •  Identify aspects of market systems and categorize elements of each system

 

            Disciplinary & Language-focused: Students will/will be able to…

  •   Define traditional, market, command, and mixed economies

           

Informal & Formal Assessment:

Substantive – Formal – Descriptions of Economic Systems worksheet

Informal – Verbal check for understanding.  Students should be able to properly categorize the type of economy presented in the “Cave-o-nomics” short film.

 

Language focused – Informal – verbal check for appropriate use of vocabulary terms

 

Resources & Materials:  

 

Instructional Activities/Learning Tasks:

 

Warm-Up

  • Students will be asked to guess what the relationship between the following words: traditional, market, command, and mixed (2 min)

Main Instructional Activities/Learning Tasks

  • Students will view and take notes on PowerPoint lecture describing different kinds of economies and their elements. (20 min)
  • Students will read descriptions of different fictional country’s economies and will sort each economy by category. (15 min)

 

Closure

  • Students will view a short film “Cave-o-nomics” and will be asked to identify what type of economy is being portrayed in the film. (7 min)

 

Modifications/Differentiation:

  • Students in inclusion classrooms will have the teacher read aloud the country’s description and will work together as a large group to identify what kind of economy the country belongs to.
  • Students with IEPs will be provided with a partially completed note-taker and will fill in the blanks as we go through lecture.
Lesson Plans Govt and W. Hist. 4/23 to 4/27

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Haskell High School

4-23-18 to 4-27-18

 

Date: Monday and Tuesday

 

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

     

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Haskell High School

4-23-18 to 4-27-18

 

Date: Wednesday-Friday

 

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

     

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.

 

World History

Bill Nobles

Haskell High School

4-23-18 to 4-27-18

Monday

Students will read the following handout

The War is Finished

This chapter tells the story of the collapse of the South Vietnamese army and government. It raises

the question whether the U.S. deserted its ally at the end of a noble, if unsuccessful, effort or if it

simply had made a serious mistake from the beginning.

Readers will remember that the final peace agreement signed on January 27, 1973, allowed

President Thieu and his government to remain in power during the U.S. withdrawal. The treaty also

allowed the North Vietnamese to stay in South Vietnam, and called for an election to unite North and

South Vietnam. The election would be supervised by a 'National Council of Reconciliation', and not the

present government of South Vietnam. This Council was to be set up 'immediately after the cease-fire.'

North Vietnamese government officials were prepared to use the election to take control of South

Vietnam. They gave orders for their followers in the south to prepare for a political campaign. If they did

not win, of course, North Vietnam still had a 145,000-man army in South Vietnam.

President Thieu, however, never planned to allow a communist take over of South Vietnam by way

of an election. "If we allow the communists to operate," he said, "we will lose control of the country." That

explains his order to his police the day after he signed the Paris Peace Accord, to kill Vietnamese "who

suddenly begin taking a communist tone."

Violations of the Cease Fire

As it turned out, both sides cheated on the peace agreement before it even went into effect. Shortly

after he accepted the in-place cease-fire, Henry Kissinger telegraphed Thieu to take more territory from

the Vietcong. The day before the agreement was signed, the Vietcong took over some 300 villages

controlled by South Vietnam. On the first day of the peace agreement the South Vietnamese government

started attacking these villages to drive the Vietcong out.

From the winter of 1973 to the spring of 1975, the South Vietnamese government more or less

followed the orders given by President Thieu. Communists were arrested and put in jail. No steps were

taken to form the National Council of Reconciliation that was supposed to prepare for an election. And no

elections were held.

Corruption in South Vietnam

According to an old Vietnamese expression, 'a house leaks from the top.' President Thieu promoted

military officers based on their loyalty to him, and not their ability and performance as soldiers. He did

nothing to stop the corruption in his government. Thieu' s wife and her friends made millions of US

dollars buying and selling real estate in Saigon. They made their purchases based on what they knew the

government wanted to buy. Generals kept the money that was supposed to pay their soldiers. Army

officers sold weapons and ammunition to the Vietcong. Soldiers who were supposed to deliver military

supplies to the ARVN sold them on the black market. People who criticized the government were

arrested and thrown in jail. At the very bottom of this chain of corruption, the South Vietnamese soldier

did not have enough money to feed his family. Poorly motivated, led, trained, and fed, when the time

came, he was not prepared to fight.

Stage 3 of Guerrilla War

The South Vietnamese had failed to take the first steps that were supposed to lead to the Council of

National Reconciliation that would run free and democratic elections. The North Vietnamese

subsequently prepared for their final military campaign. After years of guerrilla warfare, North Vietnam

was prepared for Stage 3 — large unit attacks. The famous Ho Chi Minh trail, that for years had been

used to infiltrate men and supplies into South Vietnam, was a narrow jungle trail under protective

covering of trees. North Vietnam converted the trail into an all-weather highway. It stretched from North

Vietnam, through Laos and Cambodia and into the Mekong delta, south of Saigon. With its various

feeder roads, it covered 12,000 miles. A 3,000-mile long pipeline was built to supply needed gas for the

North Vietnamese army. The road even had rest, service and repair stations. Anti-aircraft guns guarded

the roadway. Trucks, tanks and armed cars drove south down these roads. The Vietnamese had come a

long way from their guerrilla war days, and when the time came, they would be ready to strike.

Stage 3 of guerrilla warfare, full army attacks, began on March 10, 1975. First the South Vietnamese

Air Force was chased off by Russian anti-aircraft guns. Then North Vietnamese tanks poured in to their

first targeted town, Banmethout. Suddenly confronted by Russian tanks and a well-armed enemy, South

Vietnamese troops panicked and fled.

President Thieu decided to give up all of his positions near the North Vietnam border to

concentrate his troops in the southern region around Saigon. Then he changed his mind and ordered a

defense of the North. But the army general defending Pleiku fled by plane, leaving his soldiers and their

families to escape on their own. Before long some 200,000 leaderless men, women, and children were

fleeing toward Danang on the coast. But Danang itself was under attack. Soon, the South Vietnamese

army had turned into a terrorized mob of fleeing men. They used their weapons, if at all, to shoot

civilians in their path. Reaching the water's edge:

the soldiers went down to the beach, where some threw away their weapons and their uniforms

and dived into the sea to swim out to waiting American ships, while others commandeered boats

and then began firing at one another on the open water. Soon the scenes in Danang were repeated

in cities through most of South Vietnam. In one city, the soldiers were shooting at the owners of

the restaurants where they ate. Something deeper than the collapse of an army's discipline was

taking place. It was the disintegration of a society that had been pulverized by war and corrupted

by foreign invaders for thirty years. A society that had lost all sense of self-respect and that

despised itself for its subservience to one foreign master after another — a society that had been

turned into a literal brothel for millions of soldiers from foreign countries — was tearing itself

apart in a fury of self-destruction.23

Similar scenes were taking place in other cities. Thieu's million-man army equipped with excellent

American weapons simply self-destructed seeking some kind of safety, somewhere other than in

Vietnam.

The Last Days of Saigon

This spreading panic threatened Saigon as that city prepared to defend itself. Gerald Ford, formerly

Nixon’s vice-President, became commander in chief in 1974 after Richard Nixon resigned because of his

23 The New Yorker, (April 14, 1975), pp. 27-28.

involvement in the cover up of a break-in of the Democratic Party headquarters in Watergate. President

Ford and his Secretary of State, Henry Kissinger, asked Congress for another $700 million to defend the

rest of South Vietnam. But Congress, by this time tired of the long war, refused. Kissinger, Thieu and

others later blamed the U.S. Congress for the defeat, which followed.

One month after the fall of

Danang the North Vietnamese army

marched into Saigon. As the enemy army

approached the capital, the ARVN

collapsed completely and surrendered

with hardly a fight. With it, billions of

dollars of U.S. equipment fell into the

hands of North Vietnam. Meanwhile

men, women and children tried

desperately to escape the enemy. Fifty

thousand people fled Saigon the week

before the communist forces arrived.

Seven thousand were air lifted by

helicopter to waiting U.S. ships off shore

in the last 18 hours. The million

Vietnamese who had depended on the

U.S. had good reason to fear living under

control of the victorious communist army

after 29 years of brutal warfare.

Although the outcome certainly could not please the U.S., at least the long war was finally over.

Assessment/Formal and Summative

Start discussion centered around topics outlined below. Students will then begin formal assessment.

 Student Exercises:

1. Describe and try to account for the failure of the 1973 peace agreement and the subsequent collapse of

the South Vietnamese government in the Spring of 1975.

2. Do you think that Congress made the right decision not to vote for an additional $700 million to defend

Saigon? Why or why not?

3. Given the final outcome of the war, evaluate U.S. policy in Vietnam - a mistake from the beginning or a

noble, but unsuccessful effort. Explain. (Note: last chapter focuses totally on this question).

 

World History

Bill Nobles

4-16-18 to 4-20-18

Tuesday and Wednesday

Students will review unit exam on the 1960’s and the Vietnam War and then take the examon the following day.

World History

Bill Nobles

Thursday and Friday

 Journey through the United States Domestic and Foreign Policy from 1970 to 199

Performance Expectations:

V. Individuals, Groups, and Institutions

c. describe the various forms institutions take, and explain how they develop and change over time

VI. Power Authority, & Governance

i. evaluate the extent to which governments achieve their stated ideals and policies at home and abroad;

What is the student going to learn and why?

The student will learn about domestic and foreign policy in the United States throughout the 1970s until the fall of the Soviet Union. They will be addressing the challenges and opportunities that exist for the United States as we enter the 21st century as well. These two initiatives address two standards and give the students the opportunity to create an understanding of domestic and foreign policy. The student will be focusing their energy on researching the United States domestic policy as it relates to the ever-changing stance that our government takes on Environmentalism. Their research will begin in the 1970's while they look at the birth of Environmentalism, and it will move chronologically through the next three decades as they look at how different Presidents and different Congresses change our policies concerning the Environment. This is important because it will help to show the students how while we might value the environment during one decade, after a Presidential change, the nation may turn their domestic concerns to other topics. The students will complete this learning objective by creating an interactive timeline and completing a shortened essay in order to tie the information together. From this point, the students will look into the foreign policy and its evolution since the 1970s. Students will be using the information regarding the evolution of foreign policy to then diagnose challenges that the United States may experience, as the 21st century gets under way, and recognize opportunity that exists for the United States as well.

How does this project affect life outside of school?

The student researches the nation's past, recent, and future policy decisions. The student will begin to recognize patterns in policy and notice that much of their life today is influenced by the

decisions made regarding domestic or foreign US policy. As the students are listening to the news after completing this project, it may result in a better understanding of current events. By this point, many high school students have also formulated opinions regarding the environment, and the United States' foreign involvement. Upon completion of this project, students are granted the opportunity to formulate more authoritative, educated opinions regarding the two topics.

What makes this project important to the community or the world around the student?

When individuals are more aware of the political world around them, they are more active citizens and participants in their community. If we as educators are working to develop global citizens and participants, we must provide an opportunity for the student to understand the United States position of policy both historically and currently as well as domestic and foreign.

Questions that the student will be able to answer by doing this project:

- How did domestic policy evolved through the 20 years in question?

- How did foreign policy evolved throughout the 20 years in question?

- In the future, what challenges does United States policy face?

- In the future, what opportunities does the United States policy have for positive change?

Tasks and activities:

Part A: PowerPoint Presentation

- The history of domestic policy slide show:

The PowerPoint will guide the students through the past 40 years and the domestic policy regarding the environment. They will need to create 1-2 slides per decade and explain important policy changes that occurred during that time period. (see student handout attached for further details)

o Time necessary to complete: 120 minutes

Part B: Essay

- Domestic policy essay

The essay will consist of an introduction paragraph, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph. The essay will be spiraling through the slideshow information. They will need to explain how the domestic policy regarding the environment has evolved throughout the last 40 years to begin the essay. They will then

continue to outline the challenges that the United States faces with its environmental policies in the near future. To complete the essay they will synthesize what they believe are opportunities for betterment that the United States has in their near future.(see student handout for further details)

o Time necessary to complete: 45 minutes

Part C: Essay

- Foreign policy essay

This final essay will be three sections. The first section will be explaining foreign policy in each decade. The second section will begin by explaining the evolution of foreign policy through the four decades and end discussing the current foreign policies that the United States is working with. The third section is similar to the essay on domestic policy and they will once again be using three challenges and three opportunities. To conclude the essay, they will choose one of the selected quotes and explain what they believe is better plan for future United States foreign policy. (see student handout for further details)

o Time necessary to complete: 120 minutes

Assessment-Formative

Essay

Lesson Plans 3/12 to 3/15

World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 3/12 to Thursday 3/15

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page.World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 2/20 to Friday 2/23

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page.

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Monday, Mar. 12

 

Description

This lesson will analyze how the two party system has affected American history.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Understand the origins of political parties in the United States.
  2. Identify and describe the three periods of single party domination and describe the current era of divided government.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the Venn graphic organizer in the text, p. 94-102.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

 

2. Bellringer: Students will view the two party symbols in a Thomas Nast Political cartoon and write down the qualities associated with these animals. Discussion will be based on these and what students believe Nast’s purpose was using these two principals.

3. Introduce topic: Analyzing political parties through political cartoons.

4. Students will read Ch. 5 Section 2 and complete the political cartoon worksheet.

5. Students will discuss the last question on the worksheet on the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 might affect party balance and how events such as new technology, major historical events and cultural change can affect attitudes about political parties.

 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the political party worksheet.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Tuesday, Mar. 13

 

Description

This lesson is designed to suffrage rights, voting requirements, and the historical relationship between voting and Civil Rights.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

            7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under

the law.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Examine the reasons for expansion of voting rights.

2. Analyze how voting qualification have changed over time.

3. Identify historical barriers and voter discrimination trends that have affected African-Americans historically.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Organize the class into three groups and assign each group a section from the chapter.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students groups will create a presentation detailing the main points of the section.

3. As the groups give their presentations they will create a study guide on the Smart Board outlining each section’s main points.

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on class presentations

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Wednesday, Mar. 14

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Thursday, Mar.. 15

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 16

 

Description

This lesson the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will complete required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the exam

World History and Government Lesson Plans 2/20 to 2/23

World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 2/20 to Friday 2/23

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page. 

 

 

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 20

 

Description

This lesson will analyze how the two party system has affected American history.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Understand the origins of political parties in the United States.
  2. Identify and describe the three periods of single party domination and describe the current era of divided government.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the Venn graphic organizer in the text, p. 94-102.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

 

2. Bellringer: Students will view the two party symbols in a Thomas Nast Political cartoon and write down the qualities associated with these animals. Discussion will be based on these and what students believe Nast’s purpose was using these two principals.

3. Introduce topic: Analyzing political parties through political cartoons.

4. Students will read Ch. 5 Section 2 and complete the political cartoon worksheet.

5. Students will discuss the last question on the worksheet on the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 might affect party balance and how events such as new technology, major historical events and cultural change can affect attitudes about political parties.

 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the political party worksheet.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 21

 

Description

This lesson is designed to suffrage rights, voting requirements, and the historical relationship between voting and Civil Rights.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

            7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under

the law.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Examine the reasons for expansion of voting rights.

2. Analyze how voting qualification have changed over time.

3. Identify historical barriers and voter discrimination trends that have affected African-Americans historically.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Organize the class into three groups and assign each group a section from the chapter.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students groups will create a presentation detailing the main points of the section.

3. As the groups give their presentations they will create a study guide on the Smart Board outlining each section’s main points.

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on class presentations

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Noble

Thursday, Feb. 23

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 23

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 16

 

Description

This lesson the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will complete required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the exam

World History and Government Lesson Plans 2/06 to 2/09

ThLesson Plans 4/12-4/15

World History The Cold War
Origins

After working together to defeat the Axis Powers in Europe and in the Pacific, relations between the Soviet Union and its western Allies quickly soured. The first cracks in the relationship appeared before the war ended at the Potsdam Conference, where Allied leaders found common ground on the future of Germany but clashed over Soviet demands for friendly "buffer" states between it and its enemy in two devastating world wars. This hairline fracture soon became a gaping chasm as East and West sought to shore up allies, first in Europe and then in Asia, Africa and Latin America. It was, in fact, in the Third World, which was emerging from centuries of European domination, that the Cold War became "hot." Unwilling to risk the nuclear Armageddon that a direct conflict would surely bring, the superpowers instead focused their military efforts on establishing friendly states around the globe. So while the poles of the Cold War were centered in the US and Soviet Union, the magnetic field of the conflict encompassed the entire world. It is this global nature of the conflict that provides the context for the unit's essential question: How did Cold War tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union impact the economic, social and political development of former European colonies in the Third World?

 

 

 

Tuesday and Wednesday

Objectives: 1) Compare and contrast the causes and courses of World Wars I and II; 2) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II; 3) Explain the United States' policy of containment

Class Work: Document-Based Question; paragraph writing; guided reading

 

Thursday

Objectives: 1) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II;

Class Work: Guided note-taking on movie, Atomic Cafe

 

Friday

Objectives: 1) Explain how mutual distrust developed into open hostility between the US and USSR after World War II; 2) Analyze the role of nuclear weapons in keeping the conflict between the US and USSR "cold"

Class Work: Guided note-taking on movie; Analyze political cartoon

 

Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 6

 

Description

This lesson is designed to examine the formal amendment process for the U.S. Constitution

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 2: The student will describe the historic and philosophical foundations of the United States republican system of government.

            6. Analyze the steps of the constitutional amendment process including examples of recent attempts to amend the United States Constitution as exemplified in the issues of the Equal Rights Amendment and flag desecration.  

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Compare the process of ratification of amendments by studying charts.
  2. Identify the four different ways by which the Constitution may be changed.
  3. Understand that while many amendments have been proposed, only a select group has been ratified.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the graphic organizer in the text, p. 79-83.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Introduction of the topic: the students will be informed that today the class will discuss the formal amendment process. The discussion will center around the following discussion questions; A. What has been the most often used method for ratification and why?  B. How many of the amendments were ratified this way? C. What method was used to ratify the 21st Amendment and why?  D. Describe the other two methods for ratification.  
3. Students will read the section.

4.  Class discussion.

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the class discussion.

 

 

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 7

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how basic legislation has added to our understanding of the Constitution over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the executive and legislative branches have interpreted the Constitution.

3. Analyze the role of party practices and custom in interpreting the Constitution.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will read the section, p. 85-88, then complete the cause and effect chart on p. 85.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will identify and discuss the five methods in which change occurs.

4. Students will hand in their cause and effects charts as an assessment. 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their completion of the graphic organizer on p. 85. This is a two column cause and effect chart that must include separate items for each column.

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Thursday, Feb. 08

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how basic legislation has added to our understanding of the Constitution over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the executive and legislative branches have interpreted the Constitution.

3. Analyze the role of party practices and custom in interpreting the Constitution.

 

 

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will re-read the section, p. 85-88, then finish the cause and effect chart on p. 85.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will identify and discuss the five methods in which change occurs.

4. Students will hand in their cause and effects charts as an assessment. 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their completion of the graphic organizer on p. 85. This is a two column cause and effect chart that must include separate items for each column.

 

 

 

American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 09

 

Description

This lesson is designed to analyze the cause and effects of the day to day workings of the government the interpretation of the Constitution.

 

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

 

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Identify how federal and state governments interact and share powers over time.

2. Describe the ways in which the Federal and State governments use expressed and implied powers.

 

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Prior to instruction the students will read the section, p. 90-95, then engage in discussion.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will read the section.

3. Students will discuss the use of implied and expressed powers at the State and Federal levels.

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be evaluated on their response to discussion questions.

World History and Government Lesson Plans 1/22 to 1/26

World History

World War II

Monday-The Home Front

During World War II African Americans found themselves with conflicting feelings about supporting the war effort when their own country did not offer them the freedom America was fighting for overseas.   The Double Victory - Double V - campaign, begun by the Pittsburgh Courier newspaper in 1942, helped to address this issue.  It encouraged African Americans to participate at every level in winning the war abroad, while simultaneously fighting for their civil rights at home.

Tuesday-Nazism and Fascism

Between 1933 and 1945, Nazi Germany and its collaborators pursued a program to systematically persecute and destroy six million Jews. Nazi ideology identified other enemies; they were targeted for racial, ethnic or political reasons.

During this lesson, high school students will understand the German National Socialism (Nazi) extermination campaign against European Jewry and other targeted groups within the context of World War II history; appraise responses to the Holocaust by governments and individuals; reflect on racism and stereotyping; and reflect on responsibility and remembrance

Wednesday-D Day

General Dwight D. Eisenhower wrote his “order of the day” on D-Day, the Allied invasion of France, which spelled the beginning of the end of the Third Reich and Nazi domination of Europe.  These confident words were given to every person involved in the operation.  However, very few, including Eisenhower himself, had absolute confidence in the mission.  In fact, unknown even to Eisenhower’s inner circle, Ike had already written an announcement the invasion had failed, and that he accepted the blame.

In this lesson, students will investigate the complex aspects of Operation Overlord, including the commanders, geography and history, political, and technological challenges that made this one of the most difficult military operations in history

Thursday and Friday The Pacific War

In this lesson, students will review the historic significance of a controversy involving the Chicago Tribune, which published a series of stories inferring that the US had broken a secret Japanese code, which significantly assisted the US Navy in winning one of the biggest battles of the Pacific Theater of World War II, the Battle of Midway.  Did the Tribune go beyond the First Amendment right of freedom of the press in this instance? 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

1-22-18 to 1-26-18

 

Date: Monday, Tuesday Jan. 22-23

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify and define the basic concepts of democracy.

 

Standards

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

   3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.

   4. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the major ways governmental power is distributed, shared, and structured in unitary, federal, and confederal systems in terms of effectiveness, prevention of abuse of power, and responsiveness to the popular will.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Objectives; Students will-

  1. Identify and explain the five basic concepts of democracy.
  2. Identify real world examples of the five concepts of democracy by brainstorming and completing a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History

2. Bellringer: Students will use a Bellringer worksheet which includes a passage on the Internet and Democracy. Students will read the passage and answer the questions.

3. Students will read Ch. 1 Section 3, pp. 20-24. .

4. Students will complete the graphic organizer on p. 20 and the reading comprehension worksheet handout.

5. Students will share and discuss their answers from the bellringer exercise.
 

 

Assessments-Summative

Students will be assessed through the Understanding of Main Ideas worksheet.

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Wednesday-Friday, 1-24-14 to 1-26-1

 

Description

This lesson is designed to gather required benchmarks and reinforces the previous lesson on the basic concepts of democracy through the use of Jigsaw collaborative learning.

 

Objectives; Students will-

  1. Identify and explain the five basic concepts of democracy.
  2. Identify real world examples of the five concepts of democracy by brainstorming and completing a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

            3. Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.   

 

Procedures

Quote of the Day and Today in History

  1. Students will be given a short multiple choice test to gather required benchmark data.
  2. The class will be divided into groups and each will be assigned a particular concept of democracy.
  3. Each group will become teaching experts and then will in turn teach the other groups on each concept.

 

Assessment-Formative

Students understanding will be assessed based on a guided discussion on the five concepts of democracy.

World History and Government Lesson Plans 1/16 to 1/19

Class: Periods 2-5                                         Topic:  The Rise of Fascism    

  

 

Tuesday

Political Upheaval in the 1920’s

Instructional Objectives:

Knowledge:

The pupils

  • Students know about the World War 1.
  • Students know about the Triple Alliance.
  • Students know about the Treaty of Versailles

Understanding

The pupils

  • To Understand the Rise of Dictatorship in Italy.
  • To understand the common factors in Italy and Germany, which led to the rise of dictatorship in Italy and Germany?  
  • To understand the cause of the rise of the fascist.                

 Critical Thinking:

The pupils

  • Critically evaluate The rise of Fascism and Nazism and the second world war
  • Critically think about the cause for the rise of Fascism in Italy.

Skill:

The pupils

  • Draw the flow chart on the causes of the rise of fascist dictatorship in Italy.
  • Draw the timeline of the rise of Fascism and its causes.

Teaching Points

 

  1. The rise of dictatorships in Italy.
  2. Mussolini, dictator of Italy brought fascism in Italy.
  3. Fascism and its meaning
  4. Rise of Mussolini.

Map of Political Post war Europe, Picture of prominent leaders, Timeline of rise of Fascism, Diagrammatic Representation.

Tuesday and Wednesday

1924 – THE YEAR THAT MADE HITLER

Objective: To have students analyze, evaluate the rise of Hitler through sourcing and annotating complex text reading. 

Vocabulary: Mein Kampf, Anti-Semitic, High Treason, Nationalistic, Antiparliamentarian, The Blood and The Fist, Swastika, Volkisch

Bellringer-Quotation Interpretation:

“How it happened that Hitler came to power is still the most important question of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century German history, if not all of German history.”

                                                               -Heinrich August Winkler, Historian, 2000

 

How did Hitler come to power?

WARM UP:   Above

 

INTRODUCTION:  Adolf Hitler spent 1924 behind bars, convicted of treason after an unsuccessful coup against the unstable postwar German government.  It was a year of deep reading and intensive writing, or passionate courtroom speeches, of proselytizing to his fellow inmates, and of working feverishly on Mein Kampf.  It was, in many ways, the year that made Hitler an explosively powerful political force.  Everything that would come – the rallies and riots, the single-minded deployment of a catastrophically evil idea – crystallized in this one defining year.

 

ACTIVITY

 

Part 1 – Claim, Evidence and Reasoning –

 

Author’s Claim:  1924 was the year that made Hitler

 

 Students will prove or disprove using text. 

 

Part 2 – Share Out Discussion -

 

Critical Thinking Questions –

 

How was media influential in Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How was the judiciary influential Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How did popular opinion influence Hitler’s rise to power?

 

How did imprisonment act as a haven for Hitler’s “hate ideology’?

 

To what do you attribute the recent rise in anti-Semitic fervor in the United States?

 

 

 

 

Summary &

Assessment:

 

 

 

Text Message:  Similar to a sentence summary, students will write a summary of the key learning in text message format.

 

 

Thursday and Friday

 

Lesson and Question:

HOW CAN WE AVOID THE TRAP OF TYRANNY THAT SURVIVES IN THE REALM OF “ISMS”?

   

Concept Terminology:

Tyranny, Fascism, Nazism, Communism, Marxism, Terrorism, Capitalism, Rule-of-Law, Oligarchy, Paramilitary, Great Terror, Einsatzgruppen, The Great Action, Fahrenheit 451, Orwell 1984, Vaclav Havel, Post-Truth, Solidary Labor Movement, Totalitarianism, Authoritarianism, Intellectual Property, Extremism, Perpetual State of Emergency, Reichstag Fire, Historical Generation

   

 

Warm Up:

 

 

VIDEO – On Tyranny:  Lessons From the 20th Century – Author Interview – Timothy Snyder at the Wilson Center  (11:16 mins)

 

https://youtu.be/A7RBWea31e8

 

According to author, what are the “isms” associated with Tyranny?

 

Quotation Interpretation:  “We don’t recognize history until it knocks on our door” – Timothy Snyder

 

Do you agree/disagree?  Be specific with your response.

 

Lesson Procedure:

 

 

 

WARM UP:   Above

 

INTRODUCTION:  Timothy Snyder gives us a new translation and interpretation to historical experiences, including Nazism, Fascism, Communism and Terrorism as precursors to Tyranny focusing on our need to recognize the structures of disaster as they unfold, as well as society stopping and thinking before we accept a new reality or ideology.  Tyrants are known to crafting alternative realities that people have readily adopted rather than questioned.

 

ACTIVITY

 

Students will analyze, evaluate, annotate and synthesize excerpted secondary source based on Timothy Snyder’s book entitled On Tyranny:  Lessons From the 20th Century using Silent Sustainable Reading Strategy.  Students will formulate a THESIS and support with evidence from the text.  Upon completion they will engage in a Conversation With Yourself  before Turn and Talk to discuss the following

Critical Thinking Questions in a Share Out format:

 

According to the author:

 

  1. How did tyrannical behavior unfold during Nazi Germany and during the Russian Revolution?  Cite evidence from the text.
  2. How can media or collective memory craft alternative realities?
  3. Should people “stop and think” and question new ideologies before blindly accepting them as truth?
  4. If we are to formulate a historical generation, how do we recognize the signs of impending tyranny as vigilant citizens?

 

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Periods-4, Monday-Friday, 1-16-18 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Monday

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify, compare, and contrast differing forms of government in the world today.

 

Standards

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

           

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Preparations

Prepare information using examples of different governments throughout the world for comparisons. MacGruder's American Government by Prentice Hall. Have students read Chapter 1 Section 2,pp. 12-18, followed by a formmative assessment (Forms of government and concepts of democracy).

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History

2. Bellringer: Students will copy a list from the Smart Board; direct democracy, indirect democracy, dictatorship, unitary government, federal government, confederation, presidential government, and parliamentary government. They will then circle each term that describes the U.S. government, then define each circled term.

3. Students will share and discuss their classifications that define The U.S. government.

4. Students will read pp. 12-14 on Participation and participate in Guided Discussion
5. FORMS OF GOVERNMENT-- Guided Discussion-(Where is the Power?)--UNITARY- a centralized government where all powers held by the government belong to a single, central agency. (Most gov'ts are unitary in form) Federal government-one in which the powers of government are divided between a central government and several local governments. CONFEDERATE GOV'T-an alliance of independent states. Most power is held by independent states leaving the central government weak. Explain the relationship between legislative & executive agencies--Presidential: separation of powers between the legislative and executive branches of government. Parliamentary: Executive is made up of the prime minister or premier and that of officials’ cabinet. They themselves are members of the legislative branch, the parliament. Dictatorship exists where those who rule cannot be held responsible to the will of the people.-dictatorship is probably the oldest & most common form of government known..

6. Discuss dictatorships based on the following; Why do dictatorships tend to endure for decades?  Why do dictatorships tend to go hand in hand with military power? What circumstances are likely to create a dictatorship?

 

Assessments-Formative

Student understanding will be based on a class discussion on why Dictatorships adopt some form of democratic governments, such as popular election and elected legislative bodies?

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Periods-4, Monday-Friday, 1-1618 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Tuesday and Wednesday

 

Description

This lesson is designed to identify, compare, and contrast differing forms of government in the world today.

 

Objectives

  1. Students will compare and contrast democracies and dictatorships by predicting their responses in different situations.
  2. Classify governments according to three sets of characteristics.

3. Define governments based on who can participate

 

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

CS 1.2. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics

 

Preparations

Prepare information using examples of different governments throughout the world for comparisons. MacGruder's American Government by Prentice Hall. Have students read Chapter 1 Section 2,pp. 12-18, followed by a formative assessment (Forms of government and concepts of democracy).

 

 

Procedures

Students will be given a reading comprehension worksheet to complete. The students will read Ch. 1 Section 2, pp. 12-18. Students will complete the worksheet and then as a separate assignment answer the Section 2 Assessment questions #2, #3, and #5.

 

Assessment-Summative

Students understanding will be assessed based on the Reading Comprehension Worksheet and the Section assessment questions on p. 18.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

American Government

Bill Nobles

Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 1-18-18 to 1-19-18

 

Date: Thursday and Friday

 

Description

This lesson will identify and explain the five concepts of democracy by using a graphic organizer and teach students to identify real-world examples of the five concepts.

 

Standards Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.

CS 1.2. Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics.        

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Identify and explain the five concepts of democracy by completing a graphic organizer.
  2. Identify real world examples by brainstorming and filling out a table.
  3. Discuss the responsibilities and duties of citizenship.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

 

Preparation

Assign Chapter 1 Section 3, pp. 20-24 and the graphic organizer in the text.

 

 

Procedure

Today in History and Quote of the Day

  1. Following the reading and completion of the students’ graphic organizers have volunteers provide definitions and express what each concept means to them.
  2. Ask the students what the term Free Enterprise means to them.
  3. Extend the discussion by asking the students the following questions; Why might going to school be a duty instead of a responsibility? Should volunteering be a duty rather than a responsibility? What would be the benefits of making voting a duty? What might happen if serving on a jury was a responsibility rather than a duty?

 

Assessment-Summative and Formative

Students graphic organizers 

Sectionalism and Civil War

World History Lesson Plans

Monday-Thursday 11/13 to 11/17

 

Lesson Plans 10/23 to 10/27

World History

Monday-Wednesday

Inventors of the Industrial Revolution

Interactive Powerepoint presentation

Have students complete the Inventor Chart and also require that they write questions they would like to know more about---one for each invention category. Do NOT have them take the quiz right away. Reconvene the class to share these questions for discussion and clarification purposes. Then have students return to the laptops for the quiz.

As a class discussion and lesson, have each student hypothesize what would have happened without a certain inventor by “subtracting” from the classroom, describing of things we use today traced back to the Industrial Revolution. For example, Betty says, “I subtract everything woven. We would all be wearing handwoven or hand-knit clothing if it weren’t for the Power Loom. If the class is split into two teams, they can earn points and compete by coming up with valid ideas.

  • Since the activities will take more than one class day- possibly as many as 3 or 4- have students recall something about each invention group from the day before to “earn” the right to be Vanna… or let the class play “stump Vanna” with invention questions from the previous days to remove the board operator and replace him/her. It is sometimes very helpful to have your most active and disruptive student operate the board because it keeps him/her on task and focused.
  •  
World History Lesson Plans 8/28 to 9/1

  Monday and Tuesday

 

Islamic Contributions to the World

 

 

Drinking industry and Distilled liquids

It was Muslim chemists who first invented pure distillation processes, which could fully purify chemical substances.
Purified distilled alcohol by Jabir ibn Hayyan in the 8th century

 

Hygiene industries

True soap made of vegetable oils (such as olive oil) or with

aromatics (such as thyme oil)were invented by al-Razi Rhazes.  Perfumed and colored soaps and liquid and solid soaps were also invented by Muslim chemists as well.

 

Islamic Astronomy: Astronomical instruments

Muslim astronomers developed a number of astronomical instruments, These instruments were used by Muslims for a variety of purposes related to astronomy, astrology, horoscopes, navigation, surveying, and timekeeping.

 

Analog Machines (or Computers)

The Plate of Conjunctions, a computing instrument used to determine the time of day invented by al-Kashi in the 15th century. A mechanical planetary computer called the Plate of Zones could predict the true positions in longitude of the Sun and Moon, and the planets in terms of elliptical orbits.

 

Parachute

In 9th century Islamic Spain, Abbas Ibn Firnas (Armen Firnas) invented a primitive version of the parachute and the hand glider.

 

Camera

Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen), the "father of optics" and pioneer of the modern scientific method, invented the camera obscura and pinhole camera.He was the first person to realize that rays of light enters the eye, rather than leaving it, The word "camera" comes from the Arabic word qamara for a dark or private room. Ibn al-Haytham first described pinhole camera after noticing the way light came through a hole in window shutters.

 

Chemical technology

Jabir ibn Hayyan (Geber), the father of chemistry, invented the alembic still and many chemicals, including distilled alcohol, and established the perfume industry.

 

Street lighting and litter collection facilities

The first street lamps were built in the Arab Empire, especially in Cordoba, which also had the first facilities and waste containers for litter collection.

 

Clock technology



Astronomical clocks
Muslim astronomers and engineers constructed a variety of highly accurate astronomical clocks for use in their observatories.

 

Mechanical clocks

The first mechanical clocks driven by weights, and gears and were invented by Muslim engineers. The first geared mechanical clocks were invented by the 11th century Arab engineer Ibn Khalaf al-Muradi from Islamic Spain.

 

Paper mill

Paper was introduced to the Muslim world by Chinese prisoners after the Battle of Talas. Muslims made several improvements to papermaking and built the first paper mills in Baghdad, Iraq, as early as 794.

 

Sugar refinery

The first sugar refineries were built by Muslim engineers. They were first driven by water mills, and then windmills from the 9th and 10th centuries in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iran.

 

Fountain pen

The earliest historical record of a reservoir fountain pen dates back to the 10th century. In 953, Ma'ad al-Mu'izz, the caliph of Egypt, demanded a pen, which would not stain his hands or clothes, and was provided with a pen, which held ink in a reservoir.

 

On/off switch

The on and off switch was invented by Muslim engineers between the 9th and 12th centuries. It was employed in a variety of automatic and water clocks. The mechanism later had an influence on the development of the electric on/off switch, which appeared in the 1950s

 

Medical Technology

Muslim physicians pioneered a number of medical treatments, including: Tracheotomy by Ibn Zuhr in the 12th century. Muslim anesthesiologist invented inoculations, modern oral and inhalant anesthesia as well as the first smallpox vaccine in the form of cowpox. At least 2,000 medicinal substances were invented by Muslim technology.

 

Medical university and public hospital

The Islamic hospital-universities were the first free public hospitals, the first medical schools, and the first universities to issue diplomas. The first of these institutions was opened in Baghdad. They then appeared in Egypt from 872 and then in Islamic Spain, Persia and the Maghreb thereafter. Physicians and surgeons at Islamic hospital-universities gave lectures to medical students and a diploma would be issued to any student who completed his/her education and was qualified to be a doctor of Medicine.

 

Military technology

After the spread of early gunpowder from China to the Muslim world, Muslim chemists and engineers developed compositions for explosive gunpowder and their own weapons for use in gunpowder warfare.

 

Hand cannon, handgun, portable firearms

The first portable hand cannons (midfa) loaded with explosive gunpowder, the first example of a handgun and portable firearms were used by the Egyptians to repel the Mongols at the Battle of Ain Jalut in 1260, and again in 1304. 

 

Wednesday and Thursday

THE ENLIGHTENMENT  

Until the late 1700’s, people of France accepted the fact that their king ruled by divine right, that Church teachings were correct, and that well-to-do nobles had privileges not enjoyed by the poor. But by the end of the century, Frenchmen no longer accepted these beliefs. This change in attitude came about as the result of writings by a group know as the ‘philisophes’. The philisophes were intelligent, reasonable men who felt there was much about life in Europe that was unfair and unjust. Since most philosophes were from France and since France was ruled by an absolute monarchy surrounded by a privileged nobility, the French way of life came under particular attack. The chart which follows lists four leading thinkers of the 1700’s. They published writings during a perid called the Age of Reason, or Enlightenment. Many ideas from the Enlightenment were eventually adopted by countries in Europe and around the world. Ideas even spread to the United States and are today a part of our way of life. Read each statement by the philisophes given on the chart and decide whether the statement is a true description of present American life. If it is true of the United States today, fill in the space with yes. If the ideas or attitude is not true of present life in the U.S., put no in the space. 

The philisophes were intelligent, reasonable men who felt there was much about life in Europe that was unfair and unjust. Since most philosophes were from France and since France was ruled by an absolute monarchy surrounded by a privileged nobility, the French way of life came under particular attack. The chart which follows lists four leading thinkers of the 1700’s. They published writings during a perid called the Age of Reason, or Enlightenment. Many ideas from the Enlightenment were eventually adopted by countries in Europe and around the world. Ideas even spread to the United States and are today a part of our way of life. Read each statement by the philisophes given on the chart and decide whether the statement is a true description of present American life. If it is true of the United States today, fill in the space with yes. If the ideas or attitude is not true of present life in the U.S., put no in the space. 

John Locke 1. All men are free and equal at birth. 2. Everyone has the right to life liberty, & property. 3. Citizens have the right to overthrow the government when their natural rights are violated. 4. Rulers receive the right to govern from the people and unfair rulers can be forced from power. 5. Man is not born to be a good or evil person – he is made one way or other by his life experiences and society around him. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ Baron de Montesquieu 1. An absolute ruler in an  Baron de Montesquieu 1. An absolute ruler in an undesirable leader because one-man rule limits basic freedoms such as speech, press, and religion. 2. There should be a ‘separation of powers’ in government between legislative, executive and judicial. 3. Slavery, torture, religious persecution, and censorship are all wrong. 4. A man is innocent until proven guilty. 5. When one country increases its military power, so do other countries; therefore all nations should limit their military strength in order to reduce the chances of war. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______   

Voltaire 1. A man should not be persecuted because of his religious beliefs. 2. Religious myths and ceremonies do nothing to make men better and should therefore be ignored. 3. Clergymen are more interested in increasing the power of the Church that they are in making man better. 4. A scientist is a greater person then a conquering general. 5. All men should be treated as equals and should have freedom of the speech and of the press. 6. Democracy is not a good form of government because the common people are not capable of governing themselves; the best government is one headed by a good and fair king. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ 6. _______ 

Rousseau 1. It is unfair that some people are rich while other people are poor. 2. The rich should not enjoy special privileges. 3. Compared to man during the Stone Age, modern man is unhappy, insecure, and greedy. 4. Social and political reforms must be made before man can be a good person. 5. Democracy is a good form of government. 1. _______ 2. _______ 3. _______ 4. _______ 5. _______ 

QUESTIONS: 1. In the philosophes were alive today, do you think they would be generally satisfied or dissatisfied with social conditions and the type of government we have today. EXPLAIN! _______________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ 2. Which three statements by the philosophes do you believe are of the greatest importance to mankind? a. ___________________________________________________________________ b. ___________________________________________________________________ c. ___________________________________________________________________

 

  3. Choose one of the statements and tell why you disagree with it. a. Statement: __________________________________________________________ b. Reason for disagreement ________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 4. Not all the philosophes held the same beliefs, but most agreed that: a. Reason should be used at all times b. The search for new knowledge and ideas should continue c. Improvements must be made in the system of justice to end unfair jail sentences, the torture of prisoners, and terrible conditions in prisons. d. Slavery and warfare should be done away with e. Freedom of religion, speech and press must be given to all f. Everyone should enjoy liberty and equality. g. There should be public education for all, not just schools for children of the wealthy.  

Bill Nobles

Upcoming Events

Bill Nobles Lesson Plans World History

Lesson Plans 05/07 to 05/11

Objectives

World History Monday and Tuesday       Regional Conflict

Students will

  • research the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and
  • answer questions from textbook on Israeli or a Palestinian issues.

Materials

 

  • Print resources about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
  • Paper, pens

Procedures

  1. Discuss the background of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict featured in the video. These questions will help focus the discussion:
    • Who is involved in this conflict?
    • What region is at the heart of the conflict? Describe the claim that both groups have on this region.
    • What is Israel? When was it founded and by whom?
    • What is the Zionist Movement?
    • Describe the role of the U.S. in the establishment of Israel, a Jewish state.
    • How did the Holocaust affect the formation of a Jewish homeland?
    • What is the PLO? Whom does it represent?
    • Which nations are opposed to a Jewish state? (Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and Egypt)
    • What was the intifada? Who was involved and what caused it?
    • What caused the rise of militant Islam? What is its link to modern terrorism?
    • What is Hamas
  1. After students have completed their research, have them write a personal account, such as a letter or journal entry, from the point of view of an Israeli or Palestinian student. The accounts can be written in the present day or in the past, but they must reflect a major event in the history of the conflict and they should include several details based on research. Challenge students to consider how it must feel to live in the midst of such a conflict.
  2. Have students work in pairs to critique each other's work. Was the account believable? Was it clear when and by whom it was supposed to be written? Did the account include relevant facts based on research? Did it reflect how a young person might feel living in the midst of conflict? Students should revise their writing based on the critique.
  3. Collect the accounts and make copies for everyone in the class. As a homework assignment, have students read the accounts and come prepared to discuss them the next day.

To conclude the lesson, lead a discussion about the accounts. How did students imagine it would feel to be involved in such a conflict? Did they imagine differences between Palestinian and Israeli students? How might their experiences be similar? What was most challenging about writing this assignment? Do students think it is difficult for most Americans to understand the emotions behind the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? Why or why not?

World History Wednesday through Friday

Regional Conflict continued

Background on the Conflict Over KashmiThe Problem: Both India and Pakistan wish to control Kashmir.

Why do both India and Pakistan believe control of Kashmir is so important? The people of Kashmir are still tribal in nature. The geography is mostly rural, with fierce mountains, deserts, and valleys. Industry is undeveloped. If this region has natural resources such as oil or gold or silver in any quantity, this has not yet been discovered. Why the fuss

Background on the Conflict Over KashmirThe Problem: Both India and Pakistan wish to control Kashmir.Why do both India and Pakistan believe control of Kashmir is so important? The people of Kashmir are still tribal in nature. The geography is mostly rural, with fierce mountains, deserts, and valleys. Industry is undeveloped. If this region has natural resources such as oil or gold or silver in any quantity, this has not yet been discovered. Why the fuss?

  1. Control of the Indus River. The headwaters of the Indus River are located in Kashmir. Whomever controls the headwaters, controls the river. The Indus is vital. It brings green fertile life wherever it flows. The Indus begins in Kashmir, then flows through Pakistan, then flows into mainland India. If India chose, since Kashmir is part of India, they could dam the Indus and change the flow of the river. Without fertile land to grow crops, Pakistan would become a desert and its people would starve. Pakistan does not trust India, nor does India trust Pakistan. They will not share control of the Indus. They both want total control.

  2. Religious Sites. Both Pakistan and India have sites in Kashmir that are important to their respective religions.
    * Pakistan is predominately Muslim. Kashmir is predominately Muslim.
    * India is predominately Hindu.

  3. Strategic Location. For India, Kashmir acts as a buffer. For Pakistan, Kashmir offers a fertile roadway into India for possible invasion.

 

Who controls Kashmir today, and why? Approximately sixty years ago, Kashmir was offered a choice by the UN of becoming part of India, part of Pakistan, or becoming independent. To secure Kashmir for Pakistan, in what Muslim forces perceived to be a holy war, Pakistan invaded Kashmir. The ruler of Kashmir fled to India and agreed to place Kashmir under Indian rule if India would protect Kashmir from invasion. If there had been a vote in Kashmir, a vote by the people, the majority probably would have voted to become part of Pakistan for religious reasons. Since there was no vote, Pakistan has never accepted India's control of Kashmir. Pakistan believed then and still believes today that Kashmir should be part of Pakistan. However, for many years now, Kashmir has been part of India, just as Hawaii and California and Alaska are part of the United States.

The people of Kashmir have the same rights as any citizen in India. They have excellent schools. They have television. They have computer access just like the rest of India. Kashmir is predominately Muslim. Muslims only believe in Islamic learnings. Thus, although the people of Kashmir do not always use the benefits available to them, they are available.

 

War & Terrorism: Both India and Pakistan are convinced that they are right and that they will prevail if they continue their fight as they are doing, although this plan has not worked in six decades. In the past 60 years, Pakistan and India have fought three wars over ownership of Kashmir. India won all three. Today, the fight continues with acts of terrorism. The people of Kashmir are probably wondering why the UN won't help them and why the US won't help them. Why must they live with war and terror and what can be done?

Why doesn't the US lend a helping hand with the Kashmir conflict? The US wants to be friends with both Pakistan and India. That makes US involvement in this problem very difficult. On one hand, we have a treaty with Pakistan that says if they go to war with anyone, we will help them. We will honor that treaty. Pakistan shares a border with Afganistan. In our fight on terrorism, that border is most important, and Pakistan's help is critical. On the other hand, we don't want India mad at us. We do a great deal of trade with India that is mutually advantageous. But mostly, India is our friend. If Pakistan goes to war with India, we would have a really tough time with that. So, we try very hard not to get involved. We couldn't win.

When your students come up with any or all of the following solutions, here are some roadblocks you can use.

  • Student Suggestion: Maybe Pakistan could buy Kashmir.
    Teacher Response: It's not about money, although perhaps it's about something money could buy - food. India has the 2nd largest population in the world. They are very crowded. Kashmir has fertile valleys that could produce a lot of food. At the moment they're not producing a lot of food, but they could. India's planners see this potential and want it to feed their population. India is not about to sell or to give away Kashmir. They need it.

  • Student Suggestion: Maybe all the Muslims could move to Pakistan or the Hindus and Sikhs could move to mainland India.
    Teacher Response: People don't want to give up the homes they have lived in for thousands of years. Their life is there. If you try to make them move, you'll start a rein of terror instead of ending one.

  • Student Suggestion: How about a shared government?
    Teacher Response: Pakistan, of course, wants to protect their country and their people. But India refuses to share control of the Indus or of Kashmir.

  • Student Suggestion: How about an Independent Kashmir? Or better yet, let the people decide.
    Teacher Response: Great. Let's ask the people of Kashmir what they want. (Teacher represents the people of Kashmir.) You would probably start a civil war, whatever the outcome of the vote. And if the US helped to set up a vote, the US would risk insulting our good friend India and our good friend Pakistan, which is something the US is not eager to do. But it's a mute point. India is not about to give up Kashmir.

At this point, your students will probably be pretty much convinced that the problem is India. India is not willing to share, thus they are the culprit. When your students say so, which they will, then bring up examples of what the US government has and would do in similar situations in the US.

  • Say: The US fought a Civil War (Northern War of Aggression, War Between the States) when the south wanted to set up their own country. The south had the food. The north had the industry. You need both to be strong. The US did not allow the south to leave, just as India will not allow Kashmir to leave.

  • Ask: What if Canada announced that they wanted Alaska to be part of Canada because they wanted to control the oil Alaska produces? Would the US say - look at the geography. That's so sensible. (No way.)

  • Ask: What if the residents of San Diego, a major seaport in California, voted to become part of Mexico by an overwhelming 80% majority? Would the US government say okay? (No way.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Monday

Issues of Our Time

Objectives

l Students will examine the debate on the size of government using the question of the extent of the government’s involvement in education.

Overview/Materials Pacing

Standard

Block

 

Take a Poll

Description

Ask: What level of government should be responsible for the quality of your education?

(a) federal (b) State (c) local (d) none of these

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Summarize the Issue

Description

Have students read the feature and summarize the issue and the views

expressed in the quotes. L2 ELL Differentiate Write these terms and

definitions on the board: accountable ( responsible), curriculum (the course of study in a school), mandate (an order or command), accessible (that can be approached).

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Description

Since the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002, there has been continuing debate on the program’s value. Display Transparency 15H, No Child Left Behind. Supporters claim that it makes schools accountable for the quality of their education, while critics state that it promotes lower achievement goals. The program has also revived the debate on whether the Federal

Government is interfering in a realm that should be a State and local responsibility.

Ask: Should the Federal Government control the quality of our education system?

(yes: because education affects the nation’s competitive edge; no: because federal funding to states should not be tied to students’ test results) Does this program overstep the scope of National Government? (Answers will vary.) Then take another poll using the question at the beginning of the lesson. If students have changed their

stance, ask why.

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

 

Assessments-Formative

Informal assessment through discussion questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Tuesday

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Wednesday

Issues of Our Time

Objectives

l Students will examine the debate on the size of government using the question of the extent of the government’s involvement in education.

Take a Poll

Description

Ask: What level of government should be responsible for the quality of your education?

(a) federal (b) State (c) local (d) none of these

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Summarize the Issue

Description

Have students read the feature and summarize the issue and the views

expressed in the quotes. L2 ELL Differentiate Write these terms and

definitions on the board: accountable ( responsible), curriculum (the course of study in a school), mandate (an order or command), accessible (that can be approached).

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Description

Since the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002, there has been continuing debate on the program’s value. Display Transparency 15H, No Child Left Behind. Supporters claim that it makes schools accountable for the quality of their education, while critics state that it promotes lower achievement goals. The program has also revived the debate on whether the Federal

Government is interfering in a realm that should be a State and local responsibility.

Ask: Should the Federal Government control the quality of our education system?

(yes: because education affects the nation’s competitive edge; no: because federal funding to states should not be tied to students’ test results) Does this program overstep the scope of National Government? (Answers will vary.) Then take another poll using the question at the beginning of the lesson. If students have changed their stance, ask why.

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

 

Assessments-Formative

Informal assessment through discussion questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Thursday

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Friday

Issues of Our Time

Objectives

l Students will examine the debate on the size of government using the question of the extent of the government’s involvement in education

Take a Poll

Description

Ask: What level of government should be responsible for the quality of your education?

(a) federal (b) State (c) local (d) none of these

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Summarize the Issue

Description

Have students read the feature and summarize the issue and the views

expressed in the quotes. L2 ELL Differentiate Write these terms and

definitions on the board: accountable ( responsible), curriculum (the course of study in a school), mandate (an order or command), accessible (that can be approached).

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Edition: p. 450

Description

Since the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002, there has been continuing debate on the program’s value. Display Transparency 15H, No Child Left Behind. Supporters claim that it makes schools accountable for the quality of their education, while critics state that it promotes lower achievement goals. The program has also revived the debate on whether the Federal

Government is interfering in a realm that should be a State and local responsibility.

Ask: Should the Federal Government control the quality of our education system?

(yes: because education affects the nation’s competitive edge; no: because federal funding to states should not be tied to students’ test results) Does this program overstep the scope of National Government? (Answers will vary.) Then take another poll using the question at the beginning of the lesson. If students have changed their

stance, ask why.

Resources

Text Student Edition/Teacher

Assessments-Formative

Informal assessment through discussion questions.

 

 

 

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plans W. Hist and Gov't 4/30 to 5/04

Lesson Plans W. History

Monday

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Tuesday

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Globalization?

Globalization is an umbrella term for a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural and political changes across the globe. It is a process of increasing interdependence and interaction among people, companies, and governments of different nations, driven by international trade and made possible by innovations in information technology.

Some argue that globalization allows poor countries and their citizens the opportunity to raise their standards of living, encourage democracy and embrace multiculturalism. Others claim that globalization has simply allowed Western corporations to overwhelm world markets at the expense of small businesses, local cultures, traditions and values. The promotion and resistance of globalization has therefore taken shape at both a popular and governmental level, however, such efforts can only hope to steer globalization, not alter it. The convergence of economics, culture and politics is happening around the globe. While thoughtful, deliberate, and innovative leadership is necessary to help shape globalization, the process itself is inevitable.

Globalization has effects on the environment, culture, political systems, economic development and prosperity, and on human physical well-being in societies around the world. To truly comprehend the interconnected nature of a globalized world; to truly understand the consequences of our foreign policy choices; to truly understand the new face of the world -- citizens of all nations need to understand how globalization works and the policy choices we are facing.

On this website we have compiled a collection of lesson plans from multiple partner organizations to help you educate the next generation about globalization. You can connect to appropriate resources for the age groups you work with by clicking on the subheadings to the left. Lesson plans are then broken down into topics. The information is included within lesson plans in these topic areas is explained below.

Lesson Plan Topics

Culture: Globalization is having a significant impact on local cultures and overall global diversity -- issues that are often fraught with intense emotion and controversy. These lesson plans focus on identifying the unique characteristics that individuate the world's people, clans, and ethnicities, and evaluating the impact of cultural integration on the world.

Economics: These lesson plans cover basic economic concepts and topics that relate specifically to economics. How is one to understand globalization without understanding economics?

Economic Development: Economic development includes not only economic growth, but also development of health, education, and infrastructure that improves the lives of people in developing nations. These lesson plans cover development issues, but also development structures such as IMF and World Bank.

Environmental Resources: These lesson plans focus on the use, deterioration, desecration and/or alteration of particular resources (other than the climate). Some lesson plans at the younger levels concentrate on the impact of geographical features as well.

Foreign Policy: These lesson plans investigate the impacts of policies, politics, and politicians on global affairs.

Global Climate: Climatic challenges are increasingly the subject of international efforts because of their cross-border effects and the impossibility that just one or a few nations can solve climate related problems on their own. These lesson plans attempt to help students realize and understand the impacts of climate change on different regions and people around the world.

Global Health: Globalization increases the frequency and ease with which diseases can move around the world. It can also improve access to the medicines, medical information, and training that can help treat or cure these diseases. These lesson plans focus on health issues that impact large sections of the globe.

International Conflict: These lesson plans study conflict areas, particularly conflicts that are rooted in cultural, religious, or ethnic disparity. Some lesson plans also discuss the nature of conflict itself and potential alternatives.

International Law: International law has become a vehicle for states to cooperate regarding new areas of international relations (such as the environment and human rights), often forcing individual nation states to cede power and sovereignty to international organizations. These lesson plans discuss the increasing role of institutions such as the World Bank and the United Nations on international law.

Migration: People may migrate in order to improve their economic situation, or in order to escape civil strife, persecution or environmental disasters. Spurred by globalization, the free flow of information, improved global communication and changes in transportation have manifested in increasing migration across the globe. These lesson plans address the issue of migration and its impact on cultures, economies, and politics.

Religion: These lesson plans build an understanding of different religions, and the impact of religious practice and ritual on everyday lives.

Trade: The growth of international trade over the past several decades has been the foundation of globalization. This section deals with issues of trade including free trade agreements, barriers to trade, currency, and specific case studies of interactions in the global economy.

Wildlife and Globalization: These lesson plans, pertaining to the impact of development, climate change, conflict, and cultural practices on the animal kingdom offer a great opportunity to engage students from a fresh perspective.

Women and Globalization:These lesson plans focus on how the role of women has been altered by globalization through increased economic, cultural and political opportunity.

Wednesday-Friday

\Defining The term Poor in  a global context

  • entrepreneurship
  • rule of law
  • incentives
  • property rights
  • limited government

NATIONAL VOLUNTARY CONTENT STANDARDS IN ECONOMICSThe background materials and student activities in lesson 1, part 2 address parts of the following national voluntary content standards and benchmarks in economics. Students will learn that:

Standard 4: People respond predictably to positive and negative incentives.

  • Acting as consumers, producers, workers, savers, investors, and citizens, people respond to incentives in order to allocate their scarce resources in ways that provide the highest possible returns to them.

Standard 10: Institutions evolve in market economies to help individuals and groups accomplish their goals. Banks, labor unions, corporations, legal systems, and not-for-profit organizations are examples of important institutions. A different kind of institution, clearly defined and well-enforced property rights, is essential to a market economy.

  • Property rights, contract enforcement, standards for weights and measures, and liability rules affect incentives for people to produce and exchange goods and services.

INTRODUCTION AND LESSON THEME

The prevailing image of a “capitalist” may be an American businessman, but a survey of the world’s economies reveals that, like poverty, capitalism has many faces. “Capitalist” is used, in either praise or condemnation, to label many nations, and the label is claimed –whether deservedly or not – by many more. To begin a systematic analysis of whether capitalism is good for the poor requires a working agreement on just exactly what capitalism is.

In the last half of the 20th century, courses in “comparative systems” were found in many universities, and high school textbooks routinely had chapters bearing that title. The content typically consisted of comparing and contrasting capitalism, communism, socialism, and, occasionally, fascism, each of which was conceived of as a discrete entity or “system.” Unfortunately, the usefulness of the paradigm decayed in the face of the persistence with which actual economies crossed the lines between systems.

For example, the standard textbook definition of capitalism as “a market economy in which the means of production are privately owned,” raises more questions than it answers:

  • Must ALL production be private?
  • Is the United States truly a capitalist economy when mass transit services in most cities are publicly funded, and 1st-class mail is delivered by the federal government?
  • How could the Soviet Union have been considered truly “communist,” when peasant farmers were allowed to sell their garden produce in open markets?

Additionally, the traditional conception of “systems” was unwieldy because it incorporated the political and governmental characteristics of nations, often without specifically addressing how those characteristics altered economic institutions.

Using an institutional definition of capitalism allows us to avoid the problems of a one-size-fits-all definition. Using the framework of institutional economics, developed by Nobel laureate and economic historian, Douglass North, allows us to identify specific institutional components of capitalism and to analyze their characteristics in particular times and places.

We begin, therefore, by asserting that capitalist economies share an identifying set of institutions, whose different manifestations in practice have a similar foundation. While it may take some careful looking to see the similarities underneath the striking differences between such places as China and the Netherlands, the United States and Uganda, or India and Argentina, these similarities do exist.

The hallmark of capitalism is the existence of a particular set of institutions governing the production and exchange of goods and services. Elements of capitalism are found in almost all nations, but the forms and degrees of capitalism vary widely.

As in part 1, the purpose of this background outline is to set the stage for the investigation by creating a common vocabulary to facilitate future discussion of poverty and capitalism.

KEY POINTS

  1. Overview: In addition to U.S. capitalism, other current and recent forms include:
    • Chinese (communist) capitalism
    • western European capitalism
    • former-Soviet republics capitalism
    • African (dictator-based) capitalism
    • The different forms share similarities and manifest significant differences.
      • Capitalist economies share a set of key institutions. However, the characteristics of the shared institutions vary greatly from one capitalist country to the next
      • In their differences lies the explanation for their differing levels of success in reducing poverty.
  2. Key terms and concepts:
    • Institutions are the established behavior practices and patterns upon which the life of a community is built. Nobel laureate and economic historian Douglass North calls them “the rules of the game.” They are fixtures of people’s interactions with one another.
      • Formal institutions, like constitutions and statutory law, codify the rules under which the members of the economy interact.
      • Informal institutions and expectations of behavior are at least as important as formal institutions.
        • Doug North argues, in fact, that informal institutions may exert even more influence over behavior than formal laws. Laws may have little ability to shape behavior if they do not match up with informal but ingrained cultural and social norms.
        • Additionally, while formal laws may be changed at any time, informal institutional arrangements tend to be persistent and change very slowly.
    • Institutions influence behavior by shaping incentives.
    • Incentives are rewards and punishments for behavior.
    • Economists have long recognized that people react to incentives in predictable ways. Incentives, rather than nebulous forces like “national character,” explain observable patterns of economic decision-making.
      • North argued, by way of illustration, that if a nation’s institutions rewarded piracy, for example, then its people would face incentives to become pirates – and would do so in greater numbers than in nations without such incentives, regardless of their cultural background.
      • He also argued that institutions are not neutral: that different institutional forms may give advantages to different groups. Because that is the case, the “players” in the economy realize that changing the rules can give them an advantage, and thus they will devote resources to effect those changes.
        • Organizations such as political parties, companies, trade unions, and bureaucracies want to survive and benefit in a given institutional setting, so they will invest in trying to change the rules to increase the benefits they receive from the system. (Grossman)
        • In this sense, we must recognize that economic institutions are not immune to politics. Although Is Capitalism Good for the Poor?concentrates on the functioning of economic institutions, it is important to remember that economic institutions do not operate independently and that they are always constrained, to a greater or lesser degree, by political and governmental institutions.
  3. The common set of institutions shared by capitalist economies is:
    1. markets – institutions governing voluntary exchange;
    2. entrepreneurship – institutions governing risks and rewards of organizing resources for production;
    3. property rights – institutions governing the ownership, use and transfer of private property; and
    4. the rule of law – the extent and limits of authority and privilege.
    • The characteristics of these institutions vary greatly from country to country.
      • The result is a broad spectrum of “capitalist” practices, some empowering the poor, and some holding them back.
  4. Analogy: Institutions are the threads in a nation’s “social fabric.”
    • Like cloth fabrics, a social fabric is constructed of interwoven threads. Cloth threads are cotton, linen, wool, or synthetics; the threads from which a “social fabric” is woven are institutions.
    • This analogy also helps us to explain the variety in capitalist economies. Consider that even cloth fabrics made from only one type of thread may look and feel different. Cotton thread may be spun in different ways – bulky, thin, smooth, or rough – and the resulting cloth has a distinctive look and feel.
      • Similarly, any single capitalist institution (markets, private property, rule of law, or entrepreneurship) may take on various forms, depending on factors such as the culture, government, and history of the nation.
        • Markets, for example, differ in the extent of regulation and openness.
          • At one end of the spectrum are Hong Kong’s virtually unregulated markets, which provide almost all goods and services.
          • In Western Europe, markets provide most products, but the government provides health care, and many forms of communication and transportation.
          • At the other end of the spectrum, China’s markets provide few products; they are restricted to agriculture and a few government-selected manufactured goods.
  5. The historical record shows that the success with which a capitalist economy deals with poverty depends on the institutional forms it adopts. Some forms of capitalism have successfully generated the economic progress that alleviates poverty. Others have failed to do so.
    • In successful capitalist nations, the institutional threads have the following distinctive characteristics:
      1. Property rights are clearly defined and secured.
        • The definition of property rights includes individuals’ rights to self (labor) and possessions
      2. The rule of law prevails within a framework of limited government
        • Note that just having democratic political institutions is notsufficient to satisfy this requirement.
      3. Markets are open and competitive.
        • Competitive interaction creates an ethic in which individuals’ choices have consequences.
      4. Entrepreneurship is fostered by incentives to invent, innovate and produce.

CONCLUSION

The student activity “Will the Real Capitalism Please Stand Up?” is a small-group discussion exercise to familiarize students with the range of capitalist economies, and to give them practice in identifying the institutions – markets, entrepreneurship, property rights, and rule of law – that form the foundation of capitalism.

The next 4 lessons in Is Capitalism Good for the Poor? investigate the operation of the distinctive capitalist institutions found in nations experiencing economic growth:

  • Lesson 2: Property Rights and the Rule of Law
  • Lesson 3: Beneficiaries of Competition
  • Lesson 4: How Incentives Affect Innovation
  • Lesson 5: Character Values and Capitalism.

Together, the lessons teach students to use the tools of economic reasoning to evaluate the relationship between capitalism and poverty. The lessons address the prevailing belief that capitalism oppresses the poor and reserves its benefits for the rich. They provide the data and analytical tools for students and teachers to draw their own conclusions and to answer for themselves the question, Is Capitalism Good for the Poor?

 

 

Lesson Plans    Government

Economic Systems

traditional, market, command, and mixed economies

 

 

Grade Level and Course:

10th Grade  Government – 48 minute class periods

 

District Standards:

Analyze and compare traditional, market, command, and mixed economies as organizing systems for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. (OK 4.1.1)

 

NCSS and/or Common Core Standards:

NCSS VII. PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND CONSUMPTION

Have learners compare basic economic systems according to how they deal with demand, supply, prices, the role of government, banks, labor and labor unions, savings and investments, and capital;

 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.

 

Essential Question:

What are the different kinds of economic systems?

 

Learning Objectives:

            Substantive: Students will/will be able to…

  •  Identify aspects of market systems and categorize elements of each system

 

            Disciplinary & Language-focused: Students will/will be able to…

  •   Define traditional, market, command, and mixed economies

           

Informal & Formal Assessment:

Substantive – Formal – Descriptions of Economic Systems worksheet

Informal – Verbal check for understanding.  Students should be able to properly categorize the type of economy presented in the “Cave-o-nomics” short film.

 

Language focused – Informal – verbal check for appropriate use of vocabulary terms

 

Resources & Materials:  

 

Instructional Activities/Learning Tasks:

 

Warm-Up

  • Students will be asked to guess what the relationship between the following words: traditional, market, command, and mixed (2 min)

Main Instructional Activities/Learning Tasks

  • Students will view and take notes on PowerPoint lecture describing different kinds of economies and their elements. (20 min)
  • Students will read descriptions of different fictional country’s economies and will sort each economy by category. (15 min)

 

Closure

  • Students will view a short film “Cave-o-nomics” and will be asked to identify what type of economy is being portrayed in the film. (7 min)

 

Modifications/Differentiation:

  • Students in inclusion classrooms will have the teacher read aloud the country’s description and will work together as a large group to identify what kind of economy the country belongs to.
  • Students with IEPs will be provided with a partially completed note-taker and will fill in the blanks as we go through lecture.
Lesson Plans Govt and W. Hist. 4/23 to 4/27

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Haskell High School

4-23-18 to 4-27-18

 

Date: Monday and Tuesday

 

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

     

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Haskell High School

4-23-18 to 4-27-18

 

Date: Wednesday-Friday

 

Description

This lesson will identify how much power should the President have?

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.

            2. Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

A. Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.

B. Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.

 

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Evaluate the controversy over the growth of presidential power by analyzing a historic political cartoon.
  2. Examine Article II, Sections 2 and 3, of the Constitution to determine the powers granted to the President.
  3. Determine whether a President’s action in selected scenarios reflects the Framers’ intent in Article II.

     

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Assign the section, the graphic organizer in the text, and the Reading Comprehension Worksheet before class. L2 Differentiate Reading Comprehension Worksheet.

3. Write the following on the board: Examine the two political cartoons on page 402 of your textbook. Answer the questions in the feature in your notebook.

4. Have students discuss their responses to the Bellringer activity. Possible answers: (left cartoon: strong presidential powers are shown controlling the smaller, weaker Congress; right cartoon: a perceived weak and meek President subtly uses his authority to gain power over a willing Congress) Write common aspects of students’ analyses on the board. Have students look at the section’s "The Means of Gaining Power." Ask: Should the President’s power have limits? List students’ opinions on the board under "Reasons For" and "Reasons Against."

 

Assessments-Summative

Have students complete the Core Worksheet by identifying the power granted by the Constitution to the President as it applies to each scenario. Then, have students determine whether the situation described is within or beyond the prescribed powers and explain their reasoning in their charts.

 

World History

Bill Nobles

Haskell High School

4-23-18 to 4-27-18

Monday

Students will read the following handout

The War is Finished

This chapter tells the story of the collapse of the South Vietnamese army and government. It raises

the question whether the U.S. deserted its ally at the end of a noble, if unsuccessful, effort or if it

simply had made a serious mistake from the beginning.

Readers will remember that the final peace agreement signed on January 27, 1973, allowed

President Thieu and his government to remain in power during the U.S. withdrawal. The treaty also

allowed the North Vietnamese to stay in South Vietnam, and called for an election to unite North and

South Vietnam. The election would be supervised by a 'National Council of Reconciliation', and not the

present government of South Vietnam. This Council was to be set up 'immediately after the cease-fire.'

North Vietnamese government officials were prepared to use the election to take control of South

Vietnam. They gave orders for their followers in the south to prepare for a political campaign. If they did

not win, of course, North Vietnam still had a 145,000-man army in South Vietnam.

President Thieu, however, never planned to allow a communist take over of South Vietnam by way

of an election. "If we allow the communists to operate," he said, "we will lose control of the country." That

explains his order to his police the day after he signed the Paris Peace Accord, to kill Vietnamese "who

suddenly begin taking a communist tone."

Violations of the Cease Fire

As it turned out, both sides cheated on the peace agreement before it even went into effect. Shortly

after he accepted the in-place cease-fire, Henry Kissinger telegraphed Thieu to take more territory from

the Vietcong. The day before the agreement was signed, the Vietcong took over some 300 villages

controlled by South Vietnam. On the first day of the peace agreement the South Vietnamese government

started attacking these villages to drive the Vietcong out.

From the winter of 1973 to the spring of 1975, the South Vietnamese government more or less

followed the orders given by President Thieu. Communists were arrested and put in jail. No steps were

taken to form the National Council of Reconciliation that was supposed to prepare for an election. And no

elections were held.

Corruption in South Vietnam

According to an old Vietnamese expression, 'a house leaks from the top.' President Thieu promoted

military officers based on their loyalty to him, and not their ability and performance as soldiers. He did

nothing to stop the corruption in his government. Thieu' s wife and her friends made millions of US

dollars buying and selling real estate in Saigon. They made their purchases based on what they knew the

government wanted to buy. Generals kept the money that was supposed to pay their soldiers. Army

officers sold weapons and ammunition to the Vietcong. Soldiers who were supposed to deliver military

supplies to the ARVN sold them on the black market. People who criticized the government were

arrested and thrown in jail. At the very bottom of this chain of corruption, the South Vietnamese soldier

did not have enough money to feed his family. Poorly motivated, led, trained, and fed, when the time

came, he was not prepared to fight.

Stage 3 of Guerrilla War

The South Vietnamese had failed to take the first steps that were supposed to lead to the Council of

National Reconciliation that would run free and democratic elections. The North Vietnamese

subsequently prepared for their final military campaign. After years of guerrilla warfare, North Vietnam

was prepared for Stage 3 — large unit attacks. The famous Ho Chi Minh trail, that for years had been

used to infiltrate men and supplies into South Vietnam, was a narrow jungle trail under protective

covering of trees. North Vietnam converted the trail into an all-weather highway. It stretched from North

Vietnam, through Laos and Cambodia and into the Mekong delta, south of Saigon. With its various

feeder roads, it covered 12,000 miles. A 3,000-mile long pipeline was built to supply needed gas for the

North Vietnamese army. The road even had rest, service and repair stations. Anti-aircraft guns guarded

the roadway. Trucks, tanks and armed cars drove south down these roads. The Vietnamese had come a

long way from their guerrilla war days, and when the time came, they would be ready to strike.

Stage 3 of guerrilla warfare, full army attacks, began on March 10, 1975. First the South Vietnamese

Air Force was chased off by Russian anti-aircraft guns. Then North Vietnamese tanks poured in to their

first targeted town, Banmethout. Suddenly confronted by Russian tanks and a well-armed enemy, South

Vietnamese troops panicked and fled.

President Thieu decided to give up all of his positions near the North Vietnam border to

concentrate his troops in the southern region around Saigon. Then he changed his mind and ordered a

defense of the North. But the army general defending Pleiku fled by plane, leaving his soldiers and their

families to escape on their own. Before long some 200,000 leaderless men, women, and children were

fleeing toward Danang on the coast. But Danang itself was under attack. Soon, the South Vietnamese

army had turned into a terrorized mob of fleeing men. They used their weapons, if at all, to shoot

civilians in their path. Reaching the water's edge:

the soldiers went down to the beach, where some threw away their weapons and their uniforms

and dived into the sea to swim out to waiting American ships, while others commandeered boats

and then began firing at one another on the open water. Soon the scenes in Danang were repeated

in cities through most of South Vietnam. In one city, the soldiers were shooting at the owners of

the restaurants where they ate. Something deeper than the collapse of an army's discipline was

taking place. It was the disintegration of a society that had been pulverized by war and corrupted

by foreign invaders for thirty years. A society that had lost all sense of self-respect and that

despised itself for its subservience to one foreign master after another — a society that had been

turned into a literal brothel for millions of soldiers from foreign countries — was tearing itself

apart in a fury of self-destruction.23

Similar scenes were taking place in other cities. Thieu's million-man army equipped with excellent

American weapons simply self-destructed seeking some kind of safety, somewhere other than in

Vietnam.

The Last Days of Saigon

This spreading panic threatened Saigon as that city prepared to defend itself. Gerald Ford, formerly

Nixon’s vice-President, became commander in chief in 1974 after Richard Nixon resigned because of his

23 The New Yorker, (April 14, 1975), pp. 27-28.

involvement in the cover up of a break-in of the Democratic Party headquarters in Watergate. President

Ford and his Secretary of State, Henry Kissinger, asked Congress for another $700 million to defend the

rest of South Vietnam. But Congress, by this time tired of the long war, refused. Kissinger, Thieu and

others later blamed the U.S. Congress for the defeat, which followed.

One month after the fall of

Danang the North Vietnamese army

marched into Saigon. As the enemy army

approached the capital, the ARVN

collapsed completely and surrendered

with hardly a fight. With it, billions of

dollars of U.S. equipment fell into the

hands of North Vietnam. Meanwhile

men, women and children tried

desperately to escape the enemy. Fifty

thousand people fled Saigon the week

before the communist forces arrived.

Seven thousand were air lifted by

helicopter to waiting U.S. ships off shore

in the last 18 hours. The million

Vietnamese who had depended on the

U.S. had good reason to fear living under

control of the victorious communist army

after 29 years of brutal warfare.

Although the outcome certainly could not please the U.S., at least the long war was finally over.

Assessment/Formal and Summative

Start discussion centered around topics outlined below. Students will then begin formal assessment.

 Student Exercises:

1. Describe and try to account for the failure of the 1973 peace agreement and the subsequent collapse of

the South Vietnamese government in the Spring of 1975.

2. Do you think that Congress made the right decision not to vote for an additional $700 million to defend

Saigon? Why or why not?

3. Given the final outcome of the war, evaluate U.S. policy in Vietnam - a mistake from the beginning or a

noble, but unsuccessful effort. Explain. (Note: last chapter focuses totally on this question).

 

World History

Bill Nobles

4-16-18 to 4-20-18

Tuesday and Wednesday

Students will review unit exam on the 1960’s and the Vietnam War and then take the examon the following day.

World History

Bill Nobles

Thursday and Friday

 Journey through the United States Domestic and Foreign Policy from 1970 to 199

Performance Expectations:

V. Individuals, Groups, and Institutions

c. describe the various forms institutions take, and explain how they develop and change over time

VI. Power Authority, & Governance

i. evaluate the extent to which governments achieve their stated ideals and policies at home and abroad;

What is the student going to learn and why?

The student will learn about domestic and foreign policy in the United States throughout the 1970s until the fall of the Soviet Union. They will be addressing the challenges and opportunities that exist for the United States as we enter the 21st century as well. These two initiatives address two standards and give the students the opportunity to create an understanding of domestic and foreign policy. The student will be focusing their energy on researching the United States domestic policy as it relates to the ever-changing stance that our government takes on Environmentalism. Their research will begin in the 1970's while they look at the birth of Environmentalism, and it will move chronologically through the next three decades as they look at how different Presidents and different Congresses change our policies concerning the Environment. This is important because it will help to show the students how while we might value the environment during one decade, after a Presidential change, the nation may turn their domestic concerns to other topics. The students will complete this learning objective by creating an interactive timeline and completing a shortened essay in order to tie the information together. From this point, the students will look into the foreign policy and its evolution since the 1970s. Students will be using the information regarding the evolution of foreign policy to then diagnose challenges that the United States may experience, as the 21st century gets under way, and recognize opportunity that exists for the United States as well.

How does this project affect life outside of school?

The student researches the nation's past, recent, and future policy decisions. The student will begin to recognize patterns in policy and notice that much of their life today is influenced by the

decisions made regarding domestic or foreign US policy. As the students are listening to the news after completing this project, it may result in a better understanding of current events. By this point, many high school students have also formulated opinions regarding the environment, and the United States' foreign involvement. Upon completion of this project, students are granted the opportunity to formulate more authoritative, educated opinions regarding the two topics.

What makes this project important to the community or the world around the student?

When individuals are more aware of the political world around them, they are more active citizens and participants in their community. If we as educators are working to develop global citizens and participants, we must provide an opportunity for the student to understand the United States position of policy both historically and currently as well as domestic and foreign.

Questions that the student will be able to answer by doing this project:

- How did domestic policy evolved through the 20 years in question?

- How did foreign policy evolved throughout the 20 years in question?

- In the future, what challenges does United States policy face?

- In the future, what opportunities does the United States policy have for positive change?

Tasks and activities:

Part A: PowerPoint Presentation

- The history of domestic policy slide show:

The PowerPoint will guide the students through the past 40 years and the domestic policy regarding the environment. They will need to create 1-2 slides per decade and explain important policy changes that occurred during that time period. (see student handout attached for further details)

o Time necessary to complete: 120 minutes

Part B: Essay

- Domestic policy essay

The essay will consist of an introduction paragraph, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph. The essay will be spiraling through the slideshow information. They will need to explain how the domestic policy regarding the environment has evolved throughout the last 40 years to begin the essay. They will then

continue to outline the challenges that the United States faces with its environmental policies in the near future. To complete the essay they will synthesize what they believe are opportunities for betterment that the United States has in their near future.(see student handout for further details)

o Time necessary to complete: 45 minutes

Part C: Essay

- Foreign policy essay

This final essay will be three sections. The first section will be explaining foreign policy in each decade. The second section will begin by explaining the evolution of foreign policy through the four decades and end discussing the current foreign policies that the United States is working with. The third section is similar to the essay on domestic policy and they will once again be using three challenges and three opportunities. To conclude the essay, they will choose one of the selected quotes and explain what they believe is better plan for future United States foreign policy. (see student handout for further details)

o Time necessary to complete: 120 minutes

Assessment-Formative

Essay

Lesson Plans 3/12 to 3/15

World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 3/12 to Thursday 3/15

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page.World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 2/20 to Friday 2/23

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page.

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Monday, Mar. 12

 

Description

This lesson will analyze how the two party system has affected American history.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Understand the origins of political parties in the United States.
  2. Identify and describe the three periods of single party domination and describe the current era of divided government.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the Venn graphic organizer in the text, p. 94-102.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

 

2. Bellringer: Students will view the two party symbols in a Thomas Nast Political cartoon and write down the qualities associated with these animals. Discussion will be based on these and what students believe Nast’s purpose was using these two principals.

3. Introduce topic: Analyzing political parties through political cartoons.

4. Students will read Ch. 5 Section 2 and complete the political cartoon worksheet.

5. Students will discuss the last question on the worksheet on the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 might affect party balance and how events such as new technology, major historical events and cultural change can affect attitudes about political parties.

 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the political party worksheet.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Tuesday, Mar. 13

 

Description

This lesson is designed to suffrage rights, voting requirements, and the historical relationship between voting and Civil Rights.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

            7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under

the law.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Examine the reasons for expansion of voting rights.

2. Analyze how voting qualification have changed over time.

3. Identify historical barriers and voter discrimination trends that have affected African-Americans historically.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Organize the class into three groups and assign each group a section from the chapter.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students groups will create a presentation detailing the main points of the section.

3. As the groups give their presentations they will create a study guide on the Smart Board outlining each section’s main points.

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on class presentations

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Wednesday, Mar. 14

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Thursday, Mar.. 15

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will review the required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the oral review questions.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Friday, Feb. 16

 

Description

This lesson the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

 

 

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students will complete required test items

 

Assessment-Formative

Students answers to the exam

World History and Government Lesson Plans 2/20 to 2/23

World History Lesson Plans 

Monday 2/20 to Friday 2/23

Cold War America: The Vietnam War (1945 – 1975)

Major Topics:

• Origins of the Vietnam War

• Tonkin Gulf & Escalation

• A War of Attrition

• The War’s Legacies

• Anti-War Movement

• End of the War

What did the United States lose in Vietnam?

This lesson teaches students that American involvement in Vietnam must be understood in the context of the Cold War. Students will draw from their earlier explorations of how Containment was implemented abroad and at home and use this knowledge to understand the roots and consequences of American intervention in Vietnam. The lesson spans several decades that cover the colonial history of Vietnam, the independence movement during World War II, the French-Vietnamese War, the country’s division at the 17th parallel, the escalation of the war following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, specific strategies and battles in fighting the war, the divisions that the war caused abroad and at home, the American loss and its consequences for the nation. Along the way, a range of perspectives teaches students that America’s longest war (up until that point) went through a number of transformations on the battlefield and in public support. Students will study the agency of ordinary Americans that both participated in and protested the war, diplomatic leaders across the world, and the important role played by the media in turning the tide of opinion in the war.

Step 1: Introduction to the Vietnam War (Class Time: 20 minutes)

Begin this lesson by immersing students in the sights and sounds of the Vietnam War. Project the Vietnam War Powerpoint presentation, accompanied by appropriate music from the period, such as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son,” Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?”, or “Blowin’ in the Wind” by Bob Dylan. (Alternatively, clips from films like Letters Home from Vietnam can provide an engaging introduction for students).

Step 2: Origins of the Vietnam War (Class Time: 55 minutes)

Begin this lesson by briefly asking students if they know how long the Vietnam War lasted. When did it begin and end? Tell students that the answers to these questions are not as simple as it would seem. Explain to students that although direct American involvement in what was to become the Vietnam War began in 1964 and lasted until 1975, the roots of the War were varied and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when the region became a colony of France. Introduce the focus question for the unit: What did the United States lose in Vietnam? Explain to the class that in order to really understand the conflict and the role it played in the larger Cold War, they’ll need to develop multiple explanations to answer the question. In this first part of the lesson, however, tell students that they will learn first about the origins of the Vietnam War by considering the following question from a variety of perspectives: Why did we fight the Vietnam War? Distribute Origins of the Vietnam War (CWA 4.1), a secondary source that provides historical context for the events leading up to U.S. military intervention in Vietnam. This document teaches students about the history of colonization and anti-colonialism in Vietnam and America’s containment policies post-World War II. The text can be read aloud as a class or in small groups. Note that this secondary source includes a number of time markers which detail a chronology of events leading to war. In order to help students understand and track the chronology, have them annotate and complete the text questions row by row together (or in small groups), carefully underlining dates and other time markers in order to build their own timeline of events. Project and distribute Southeast Asia Map (CWA 4.2) to reinforce the sequence of key events and to learn more about the region.

Distribute Why Fight the Vietnam War? (CWA 4.3) and tell students that they will now hear from four participants in the conflict: Ho Chi Minh, Ngo Dinh Diem, John Foster Dulles, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Using the source analysis tool (CWA 4.3), have students work in groups to first source each document and then summarize briefly how each historical actor would explain their answer to the focus question: Why fight the Vietnam War?

Step 3: Escalation - The Gulf of Tonkin (Class Time: 100 minutes) Origins of the War Review: In groups of two or three, have students quickly jot down their answers to the following two questions: Why did the United States fight the Vietnam War? Ask for volunteers to share their answers, which will likely vary, but should include mention of the U.S. commitment to its containment policies and the Vietnamese struggle, both North and South, for independence and self-determination.

Next, divide the class into groups of three or four. Distribute two copies of CWA 4.5 – The Tonkin Gulf Resolution to each group (students can share to save paper). Following the directions on the student handout, have the class first read and discuss the first historical context paragraph, and then listen to the audiotaped recordings of phone conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara (transcripts are included for each conversation in CWA 4.5). Finally, have students discuss with their group the questions listed on page 22. Repeat this process with the second conversation, starting on page 26, and Johnson’s Tonkin Gulf Speech, which starts on page 29. As students discuss, circulate around the room to make sure they understand what happened on both August 2 and 4, and how the president’s team responded to those events.

Next, distribute or project CWA 4.6 – Vietnam Troop Escalation. Ask students what they notice from this chart to make sure they understand that after 1964, troop levels increased dramatically. Make sure students take note of the term “escalation” and understand what it means in the Vietnam context. Finally, distribute CWA 4.7 – Who Was Responsible? In groups, have students decide who they believed to be most responsible for the US’ military intervention in Vietnam, using the directions and rubric included in the student handout.

Step 4: A War of Attrition (Homework or Class Time: 30 minutes)

Inform students the warfare in Vietnam, both ground and air, is the focus today. They will study how the war was fought, from the military strategies employed to the impact of the fighting. Tell the class they will analyze for themselves why some historians, politicians, and veterans alike have called the Vietnam War a war of attrition, one in which traditional methods of fighting would not work. Distribute A War of Attrition (CWA 4.8) and have students either read it for homework or as a full class. This reading provides the class an overview of the ground and air war in Vietnam. As students read, have them circle in the text or images examples of non-traditional fighting methods that made the war difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Review as a class.

Step 6: What Happened at My Lai? (Class Time: 50 minutes)

Another key turning point during the Vietnam War was the My Lai massacre. The mass killing of Vietnamese civilians by U.S. soldiers took place on March 16, 1968, but did not become public until late 1969, when Seymour Hersh, journalist, reported the story. At the same time, the military tried Lieutenant William Calley with murder. Tell students that they will study the varying responses to the killing of over 300 unarmed women, men, and children. In particular, they will view the massacre at My Lai from five different perspectives: (1) Army Photographer William Haeberle and LIFE magazine journalists, (2) Lieutenant William Calley; (3) Lewis B. Puller Jr, a Vietnam veteran who wrote about the massacre in his autobiography; (4) Nguyen Hieu, an eye-witness, at My Lai; and (5) the Peers Commission report, the Army’s official investigation of the My Lai massacre and cover up. At the end of class, they will discuss the focus questions, What happened at My Lai? and Why is My Lai important? 

First, distribute What Happened at My Lai (CWA 4.10). Each student should have one copy of the source analysis chart (pages 41- 42) and each group should have one copy of each primary source (pages 43 – 46). Depending on how much time you want to spend on the activity, you can either have each student review one or two sources and then share their findings with the group as a jigsaw activity, or have each student review each source and complete their charts independently, following the directions on the source analysis chart. Debrief the activity as a full class, asking students for their answers to the two focus questions: What happened at My Lai? Why was My Lai Important? Make sure all students have evidence to support their interpretations and that they consider the historical significance of the event to both the course of the Vietnam conflict and the larger Cold War battle, such as the following: • Many Americans believed that Lt. Calley was a scapegoat during the trial: the brutality of combat and war in general led American soldiers (the average age was 19) to commit atrocities otherwise unthinkable. The stress of war and the pain from losing friends inevitably led to the massacre. • Moreover, many believed low ranking soldiers took the blame even though they were just following orders from their superiors. • Others agreed with Lewis Puller, who took offense to the argument that war, rather than an individual, was to blame for the massacre. Puller, who also experienced vicious combat, took pride in his ability to control his emotions.

Step 7: Who Fought in Vietnam? (Class Time: 15 minutes)

Previously, students learned that My Lai massacre and cover-up, the Tet Offensive, and Walter Cronkite’s reaction to the Tet Offensive led many Americans to be skeptical about the war. Further inflaming the public, but most especially students, was the draft. The purpose of this lesson is 1) for students to understand how the draft worked, 2) to think about what they would have done if they were drafted, and 3) to analyze the significance of the draft. Students will investigate the following questions: Who fought in Vietnam? How were those men selected? Was the draft equitable? Distribute CWA 4.11 – Who Fought in Vietnam? Review the background information detailed on the first page. Next, project the Draft Lottery Chart on the second page of the handout. In groups, have students first determine if they would have been selected in that 1969 draft and then, what they would do if they were or weren’t selected, following the discussion questions listed on the first page. 

 

 

 

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 20

 

Description

This lesson will analyze how the two party system has affected American history.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

           

Objectives-Students will:

  1. Understand the origins of political parties in the United States.
  2. Identify and describe the three periods of single party domination and describe the current era of divided government.

 

Materials

-Pen
-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Assign the section and the Venn graphic organizer in the text, p. 94-102.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

 

2. Bellringer: Students will view the two party symbols in a Thomas Nast Political cartoon and write down the qualities associated with these animals. Discussion will be based on these and what students believe Nast’s purpose was using these two principals.

3. Introduce topic: Analyzing political parties through political cartoons.

4. Students will read Ch. 5 Section 2 and complete the political cartoon worksheet.

5. Students will discuss the last question on the worksheet on the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 might affect party balance and how events such as new technology, major historical events and cultural change can affect attitudes about political parties.

 

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on the political party worksheet.

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Nobles

 

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 21

 

Description

This lesson is designed to suffrage rights, voting requirements, and the historical relationship between voting and Civil Rights.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

            7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under

the law.

            8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Examine the reasons for expansion of voting rights.

2. Analyze how voting qualification have changed over time.

3. Identify historical barriers and voter discrimination trends that have affected African-Americans historically.

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

Preparations

Organize the class into three groups and assign each group a section from the chapter.

 

Procedures

1. Quote of the Day and Today in History.

2. Students groups will create a presentation detailing the main points of the section.

3. As the groups give their presentations they will create a study guide on the Smart Board outlining each section’s main points.

 

Assessments-Summative

Student understanding will be evaluated on class presentations

 

 

Foundations of American Government

Bill Noble

Thursday, Feb. 23

 

Description

This lesson is a review of the Unit 2 exam covering Chapters 4, 5, and 6.

 

Standards

Process and Literacy Standard 1: Reading Skills. The student will develop and demonstrate social studies Common Core reading literacy skills.

Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.

            1. Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.

2. Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.

3. Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.

4. Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments, tribal and local governments.

7. Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.

8. Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address,

Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.

 

Objectives-Students will:

1. Review the test items from the required chapters

 

Materials

-Pen

-Class Notebooks

-Smart Board and Internet Access

-Textbook

 

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